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Example:

public static string BoolToYesOrNo(this bool text, out string outAsHtmlName)
{
    string[] choices = { "Yes", "No", "N/A" };
    switch (text)
    {
        case true: outAsHtmlName = choices[0]; return choices[0];
        case false: outAsHtmlName = choices[1]; return choices[1];
        default: outAsHtmlName = choices[2]; return choices[2];
    }
}

throws an exception that no overload ... takes 1 argument, altough i am using 2 arguments.

myBool.BoolToYesOrNo(out htmlClassName);

this is the exact exception: CS1501: No overload for method 'BoolToYesOrNo' takes 1 arguments.

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Yes, its possible - the error is likely due to something else. Show us more of your calling code and the exact compiler error. –  logicnp Aug 1 '12 at 7:56
1  
Leave alone out thing. Why have a switch case for bool value. Use Ternary operator for this. With switch case you have to provide a default case apart from true and false cases which is illogical. –  Nikhil Agrawal Aug 1 '12 at 7:58
    
because i want to use an extension method so i will write it in as a readable manner as possible. –  Freeman Aug 1 '12 at 8:00
    
Nikhil is right. The switch makes no sense, there's no default option for a boolean value... –  digEmAll Aug 1 '12 at 8:02
    
you can write it as if (text) { outAsHtmlName = choices[0]; return choices[0]; } else { outAsHtmlName = choices[1]; return choices[1]; }; bool will have true or false. if you want to return "N/A" use bool? If you use bool, you can never return "N/A" –  Nikhil Agrawal Aug 1 '12 at 8:03

5 Answers 5

This works fine for me with your code:

static void Main()
{
    bool x = true;
    string html;
    string s = x.BoolToYesOrNo(out html);
}

Most likely, you are missing using directive to the namespace of the type that declares BoolToYesOrNo, so add:

using The.Correct.Namespace;

to the top of your code file, where:

namespace The.Correct.Namespace {
    public static class SomeType {
        public static string BoolToYesOrNo(this ...) {...}
    }
}
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nope it sees the code perfectly and the compiler does not complain at all. I must mention that i am using visual studio 2012 RC. its just when loading the razor page it displays the error in the browser page –  Freeman Aug 1 '12 at 8:01
    
@Freeman does it work if you use SomeType.BoolToYesOrNo(...) directly ? –  Marc Gravell Aug 1 '12 at 8:03
    
@Freeman: are you sure that your extension method is inside a static class ? –  digEmAll Aug 1 '12 at 8:03
    
100 % sure, if i remove the uot parameter it works excellent. –  Freeman Aug 1 '12 at 8:05
    
@Marc, same error, tried it. –  Freeman Aug 1 '12 at 8:06

I tried your code this way and it works without any exceptions, the only thing I would point out if you are giving a parameter with out then you don't need the method to do any return of string

    bool b = true;
    string htmlName;
    string boolToYesOrNo = b.BoolToYesOrNo(out htmlName);
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This is what I did to test this out:

  1. I created a new C# Console Application (framework 4.5) in Visual Studio 2012 RC
  2. Changed program.cs to look like this

(omitting usings)

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    public static class testClass
    {
        public static string BoolToYesOrNo(this bool text, out string outAsHtmlName)
        {
            string[] choices = { "Yes", "No", "N/A" };
            switch (text)
            {
                case true: outAsHtmlName = choices[0]; return choices[0];
                case false: outAsHtmlName = choices[1]; return choices[1];
                default: outAsHtmlName = choices[2]; return choices[2];
            }
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool b = true;
            string result = string.Empty;
            string retval = b.BoolToYesOrNo(out result);
            Console.WriteLine(retval + ", " + result); //output: "Yes, Yes";
        }
    }
}
  1. I hit F5 to run the program. The code ran perfectly. So, your method is in fact correct, and there is something wrong ... well, somewhere else. Double check the braces, sometimes if you miss one you get odd errors.
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I simply paste your code and it works fine. I tried both .net 3.5 and 4.0 and no compile error is shown and the results are correct.

Why this is an overload method?

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Found the answer on a MS forum, was a vs 2012 bug, and after installing the july 2012 update, everything worked fine. Thank you.

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