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I encountred this function without any comment. I wonder what is this function doing? Any help?

int flr(int n, char a[])
{
    #define A(i) a[((i) + k) % n]
    int l[n], ls = n, z[n], min = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        l[i] = i;
        z[i] = 1;
    }

    for (int k = 0; ls >= 2; k++)
    {
        min = l[0];
        for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) min = A(l[i])<A(min) ? l[i] : min;
        for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) z[A(l[i])!=A(min) ? l[i] : (l[i]+k+1)%n] = 0;
        for (int ls_=ls, i=ls=0; i<ls_; i++) if (z[l[i]]) l[ls++] = l[i];
    }

    return ls == 1 ? l[0] : min;
}
share|improve this question
4  
The awkward moment, when you realize that flr, l, z are sensible names only when you write the code:D – Petar Minchev Aug 1 '12 at 9:08
    
Just a wild guess - flr is maybe floor and finding some minimums are involved too. Try to debug the code line by line. – Petar Minchev Aug 1 '12 at 9:09
2  
beeing a lazy person I would first check the code which is calling this.. maybe there's some clue there – Karoly Horvath Aug 1 '12 at 9:12
1  
Wow, this is a beauty: z[A(l[i])!=A(min) ? l[i] : (l[i]+k+1)%n] = 0;. Something is zeroed, but nobody knows where. I would print this out, hang it on the wall, and then start over writing a new function. – Bo Persson Aug 1 '12 at 9:43
1  
@acraig5075 There is VLA in c99. – Aftnix Aug 1 '12 at 9:51
up vote 8 down vote accepted

What a fun problem!

Other posters are correct that it returns the index of a minimum, but it's actually more interesting than that.

If you treat the array as being circular (i.e. when you get past the end, go back to the beginning), the function returns the starting index of the minimum lexicographic subsequence.

If only one element is minimal, that element is returned. If multiple elements are minimal, we compare the next element along from each minimal element.

E.g. with an input of 10 and {0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 1, 0, 0, 1, 0}:

  • There are four minimal elements of 0, at indices 0, 6, 7 and 9
  • Of these two are followed by a 1 (the 0 and 7 elements), and two are followed by a 0 (the 6 and 9 elements). Remember that the array is circular.
  • 0 is smaller than 1, so we only consider the 0s at 6 and 9.
  • Of these the sequence of 3 elements starting at 6 is '001' and the sequence from 9 is also '001', so they're still both equally minimal
  • Looking at the sequence of 4 elements, we have '0010' from element 6 onwards and '0012' from element 9 onwards. The sequence from 6 onwards is therefore smaller and 6 is returned. (I've checked that this is the case).

Refactored and commented code follows:

int findStartOfMinimumSubsequence(int length, char circular_array[])
{
    #define AccessWithOffset(index) circular_array[(index + offset) % length]
    int indicesStillConsidered[length], count_left = length, indicator[length], minIndex = 0;

    for (int index = 0; index < length; index++)
    {
        indicesStillConsidered[index] = index;
        indicator[index] = 1;
    }

    // Keep increasing the offset between pairs of minima, until we have eliminated all of
    // them or only have one left.
    for (int offset = 0; count_left >= 2; offset++)
    {
        // Find the index of the minimal value for the next term in the sequence,
        // starting at each of the starting indicesStillConsidered
        minIndex = indicesStillConsidered[0];
        for (int i=0; i<count_left; i++) 
            minIndex = AccessWithOffset(indicesStillConsidered[i])<AccessWithOffset(minIndex) ? 
                indicesStillConsidered[i] : 
                minIndex;

        // Ensure that indicator is 0 for indices that have a non-minimal next in sequence
        // For minimal indicesStillConsidered[i], we make indicator 0 1+offset away from the index.
        // This prevents a subsequence of the current sequence being considered, which is just an efficiency saving.
        for (int i=0; i<count_left; i++){
            offsetIndexToSet = AccessWithOffset(indicesStillConsidered[i])!=AccessWithOffset(minIndex) ? 
                indicesStillConsidered[i] : 
                (indicesStillConsidered[i]+offset+1)%length;
            indicator[offsetIndexToSet] = 0;
        }

        // Copy the indices where indicator is true down to the start of the l array.
        // Indicator being true means the index is a minimum and hasn't yet been eliminated.
        for (int count_before=count_left, i=count_left=0; i<count_before; i++) 
            if (indicator[indicesStillConsidered[i]]) 
                indicesStillConsidered[count_left++] = indicesStillConsidered[i];
    }

    return count_left == 1 ? indicesStillConsidered[0] : minIndex;
}

Sample uses

Hard to say, really. Contrived example: from a circular list of letters, this would return the index of the shortest subsequence that appears earlier in a dictionary than any other subsequence of the same length (assuming all the letters are lower case).

share|improve this answer
    
whats it for? please show examples of use :D – Shark Aug 1 '12 at 11:11
    
Good question! Let's say your array was temperature readings for the last 365 days, and you can remember there was one weird day in the middle of summer when it was as cold as winter. This function would give you the date. – Hbcdev Aug 1 '12 at 11:17
1  
That's a pretty contrived example, I admit. You could also use it if you had a faulty server which, as well as having planned downtime, kept dropping out. If you passed an array of, say, response times to the server, this function would tell you a time when it had randomly dropped out (but not for an extended period of planned downtime). – Hbcdev Aug 1 '12 at 11:19
    
@Hbcdev: To clarify, by "next minimum index", are you referring to the index of the smallest value greater than the minimum value and located after the minimum value in circular order? – Michael Aug 1 '12 at 11:30
1  
You nailed it. I just figured this out independently, and extensive tests haven't found a counter example. A simpler way to write this code would be int min = 0; for (int i = 1; i < n; ++i) if (cstrncmp(&(a[i]), &(a[min]), n) < 0) min = i; where cstrncmp is a circular version of strncmp (obviously requiring null termination of the original string). +1 – Sander De Dycker Aug 1 '12 at 13:28

It returns the position of the smallest element within the substring of a ranging from element 0..n-1.

share|improve this answer
    
Since n can be greater than size of a, i suspect that it is not true. – ushik Aug 1 '12 at 9:56
    
@ushik: That depends on what is stored in the memory outside the buffer. – Michael Aug 1 '12 at 10:05
    
There's more to it than that : when the smallest element is in the array more than once, the behavior deviates from what you'd expect from a normal min function. It doesn't always pick the first, nor the last. – Sander De Dycker Aug 1 '12 at 10:12

Test code

#include <stdio.h>

int flr(int n, char a[])
{
    #define A(i) a[((i) + k) % n]
    int l[n], ls = n, z[n], min = 0;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
    {
        l[i] = i;
        z[i] = 1;
    }

    for (int k = 0; ls >= 2; k++)
    {
        min = l[0];
        for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) min = A(l[i])<A(min) ? l[i] : min;
        for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) z[A(l[i])!=A(min) ? l[i] : (l[i]+k+1)%n] = 0;
        for (int ls_=ls, i=ls=0; i<ls_; i++) if (z[l[i]]) l[ls++] = l[i];
    }

    return ls == 1 ? l[0] : min;
}


int main() {
    printf("   test 1: %d\n", flr(4, "abcd"));
    printf("   test 3: %d\n", flr(6, "10e-10"));
    printf("   test 3: %d\n", flr(3, "zxyghab");
    printf("   test 4: %d\n", flr(5, "bcaaa"));
    printf("   test 5: %d\n", flr(7, "abcd"));
    return 0;
}

This code gives following output:

[root@s1 sf]# ./a.out 
   test 1: 0
   test 2: 3
   test 3: 1
   test 4: 2
   test 5: 4




1. 0 is the position of `a` in the first case
2. 3 is the position of `-` in second case.
3. 1 is the position of `x` in third case. 
4. 2 is the position of the second `a`.
5. 4 is the position of the `\0`

So the function returns the position of smallest element of a character pointer pointed by a and it will consider n elements. (Thats why it returned the position of x in the third case).

But when multiple smallest element available, it does not seems to be work in a predictable way, as it does not return the first occurrence, nor the last.

It should do a error checking for out of bound cases. Which may lead to problem in future.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand wh x is returned in the third case. Are you saying you're making sense of this output? :) or are you saying that in third case it returned the lexicographically smallest element in the first n elements? – Shark Aug 1 '12 at 12:14
    
It returns lexicographically smallest element in the first n elements. – Aftnix Aug 1 '12 at 12:16
    
Hey @Aftnix, my answer above explains why your fourth test returns 2 rather than 3 or 4. It's not because it's the first minimal element, it's because the subsequence 'aaa' < 'aab' and 'aaa' < 'abc'. If you try again with flr(5, "aabca") I think you'll get a result of 4 (the start of the smallest minimal subsequence) rather than 0 (the earliest minimum element). – Hbcdev Aug 1 '12 at 12:36
    
Thanks for pointing this out, i will edit my answer with correct info. – Aftnix Aug 1 '12 at 13:38

so i'm running tests on this.

int flr(int n, char a[])
{
#define A(i) a[((i) + k) % n]
int l[n], ls = n, z[n], min = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    l[i] = i;
    z[i] = 1;
}

for (int k = 0; ls >= 2; k++)
{
    min = l[0];
    for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) min = A(l[i])<A(min) ? l[i] : min;
    for (int i=0; i<ls; i++) z[A(l[i])!=A(min) ? l[i] : (l[i]+k+1)%n] = 0;
    for (int ls_=ls, i=ls=0; i<ls_; i++) if (z[l[i]]) l[ls++] = l[i];
}

return ls == 1 ? l[0] : min;
}

int main()
{
int in = 10;
char array[] = {0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 0, 1, 1, 0}; 

int res = flr(in, array);
printf("expecting res to be 6;\tres = %d\n", res);

system("pause");
return 0;
}

output was res=9;

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you expect 6? Firstly, it's not the same array as in Hbcdev's example, and secondly, since it's assuming the array is circular, starting from position 9 you would have [0, 0, 1], which indeed is the minimum subsequence. – Evert Aug 1 '12 at 13:44

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