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UPDATE 1:

I'm wondering if it has anything to do with the button being within the element which is being deleted, so it would end up deleting the button which does the deleting too? That might not be the problem, I was just typing that I'm thinking.

I've just tried:

$( "input.btnX" ).click(function(event) {
    alert("test");
});

and I don't get an alert... Should I be using live or is it on now because the buttons along with the table are dynamically generated.

ORIGINAL QUESTION:

I have a table (dynamically generated, so I won't know how many tr's it has in tbody which looks something like this:

<table>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>col1</td>
            <td>col2</td>
            <td><input type="button" class="btnX" name="x" value="x" /></td>
        </tr>
        <tr>
            <td>col1</td>
            <td>col2</td>
            <td><input type="button" class="btnX" name="x" value="x" /></td>
        </tr>
    </tbody>
</table>

How do I delete the parent tr if an x button is clicked? So in this example, if the bottom x is clicked, it should remove the bottom tr.

I've tried this:

$( "input.btnX" ).click(function(event) {
    $(this).parent('tr').remove();
});

But nothing happens.

share|improve this question
    
check this stackoverflow link [Link][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/5589420/select-tr-by-id-with-jquery –  Parag Aug 1 '12 at 9:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Just use

    $( "input.btnX" ).click(function(event) {
    $(this).parent().parent().remove();
});

Or

  $( "input.btnX" ).click(function(event) {
        $(this).closest("tr").remove();
    });

As what you are doing is going to the parent which is the tr and then looking for a tr

See an example here http://jsfiddle.net/gYDUF/

If your table is beeing rendered by javascript you may also have to change your click on

$("input.btnX" ).live(click, function(){

     $(this).closest("tr").remove();
}); 
share|improve this answer
    
check allready edited ;) –  Dominic Green Aug 1 '12 at 9:23
    
Doesn't seem to work. Please see update 1 above. –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 9:45
    
Work fine for me see the added jsfiddle are you running your code in document ready –  Dominic Green Aug 1 '12 at 9:50
    
You're got a hard coded table in your jsfiddle example, will this work with tables created on the fly dynamically? –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 9:53
    
See last part off the new update try changing your click to .live() or use $(document).delegate(selector, events, data, handler); –  Dominic Green Aug 1 '12 at 9:54

Not sure if it's better, but I use parents()...

$('input.btnX').click(function() {
    $(this).parents('tr').remove();
});
share|improve this answer
1  
This will delete all parents which are <tr> elements, anywhere up the DOM tree -- so in a nested table you would remove the entire sub-table. .closest() gets the nearest parent and targets only that (it also doesn't have to traverse the full DOM tree) –  nbrooks Aug 1 '12 at 9:36
    
+1 for being so damn right –  neokio Aug 1 '12 at 9:39
    
Doesn't seem to work. Please see update 1 above. –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 9:46

Try this:

$( "input.btnX" ).click(function(event) {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});

As the tr is not a direct parent to the input element.

EDIT: If the Table is built dynamically, try using

$( "input.btnX" ).live("click", function(event) {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem to work. Please see update 1 above. –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 9:46

First of all change the id="btnX" to class="btnX", since id should be unique.

then you can do this:

$( "input.btnX" ).live(function(event) {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't seem to work. Please see update 1 above. –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 9:46
    
You wrote that the table is built dynamically, does that mean by Javascript? –  Lixus Aug 1 '12 at 9:48
    
Edited my answer, yes you should use live since it is dynamic –  fatman Aug 1 '12 at 9:51
$( "input.btnX" ).on("click", function(event) {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});

This should do the job and avoids deprecated ".live()" (as already mentioned).

Also see this jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
See jQuery .on() and jQuery .live() (.live() is deprecated as of jQuery 1.7) –  tfeiner Aug 1 '12 at 10:17
    
I am using jquery 1.7.2 via https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js and on doesn't work for me, but live does. Any idea why? –  oshirowanen Aug 1 '12 at 10:30
    
Take a look at the link you posted. This isn't the syntax for using .on() for delegated events; you need to do $(document).on('click','input.btnX', function() { ... }) where document can also be replaced by any static element that exists at the time the handler is bound. –  nbrooks Aug 1 '12 at 10:31
    
@nbrooks ok, i overlooked that table is dynamically generated. –  tfeiner Aug 1 '12 at 11:22

The jQuery .live() method has been deprecated, and delegated event handlers should now use .delegate() (for older versions) or .on().

The syntax for using .on() for delegated events is:

$(document).on('click','input.btnX', function() {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});

Note that document here can also be replaced by any static parent element (of the future buttons) that exists at the time the handler is bound.

share|improve this answer
$("input.btnX").live("click", function(event) {
    $(this).closest('tr').remove();
});​

This fixes your problem, see this jsFiddle which shows it working.

Here is an update that shows it working with dynamic tables

share|improve this answer
1  
.live() is deprecated –  nbrooks Aug 1 '12 at 10:04

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