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I am using Zend_Form with its default decorators to create a form. This outputs the following HTML:

<dl>
<dt><label for="title">Title</label></dt>
<dd>
  <input type="text" name="title" value="some title">
  <ul>
    <li>Some error message for the title</li>
    <li>Some other error message for the title</li>
  </ul>
</dd>
<dt><label for="type">Type</label></dt>
<dd>
  <select name="type">
    <option value="1">Type 1</option>
    <option value="2">Type 2</option>
    <option value="3">Type 3</option>
  </select>
  <ul>
    <li>Some error message for the type</li>
    <li>Some other error message for the type</li>
  </ul>
</dd>
<dt><label for="description">Description</label></dt>
<dd>
  <textarea name="description" rows="40" cols="100">This is a description of the item</textarea>
  <ul>
    <li>Some error message for the description</li>
    <li>Some other error message for the description</li>
  </ul>
</dd>

I need to style this so that the labels appear to the left of the relevant input boxes and any errors in the unordered lists come out to the right of the element that they relate to.

In the good old days (joke) I could have achieved exactly what I want using a table with 3 columns as follows:

<table>
<tr>
  <th><label for="title">Title</label></th>
  <td><input type="text" name="title" value="some title"></td>
  <td>
    <ul>
      <li>Some error message for the title</li>
      <li>Some other error message for the title</li>
    </ul>
  </td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <th><label for="type">Type</label>
  </th>
  <td><select name="type">
    <option value="1">Type 1</option>
    <option value="2">Type 2</option>
    <option value="3">Type 3</option>
  </select></td>
  <td>
    <ul>
      <li>Some error message for the type</li>
      <li>Some other error message for the type</li>
    </ul>
  </td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <th><label for="description">Description</label></th>
  <td><textarea name="description" rows="40" cols="100">This is a description of the item</textarea></td>
  <td>
    <ul>
      <li>Some error message for the description</li>
      <li>Some other error message for the description</li>
    </ul>
  </td>
</tr>
</table>

Obviously this is not really something I want to consider though. Mainly because I do not really want to fix the columns to all be the same width.

I am also trying not to use the zend form decorators approach since awful nested arrays you need to supply are terrible from a code readability perspective. My ideal approach would probably be something along the lines of wrapping a div around each label, input and ul such that then using clear:both on the div. I could then use float:left on each label, input and ul.

I have been testing various other answers to this question here: http://htmledit.squarefree.com/

Nobody else's solution seems to actually work though. Obviously, it needs to work in IE although not anything before IE7. If anyone can come up with something that only works in IE8 that may be ok at a push.

I have tried applying a custom view script to the form elements but that threw up a whole bunch of other issues due to the select.

According to the following article it is perfectly valid to put the ul element in the dd part of a dl, just not in the dt: http://www.maxdesign.com.au/articles/definition/

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2 Answers 2

Use jQuery. I presume the error ul elements have some error class associated with them. Javascript:

$('ul.error').each(function(){
  $(this).appendTo(     //get error <ul>
   $(this)              //start chain from self
   .parent()            //move to parent <td>
   .prev()              //move to previous <td> element
  );                // and append there.
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I was trying to keep Jquery out of this though since I didn't want to introduce a bunch of extra client side code to the page to do something that should have been done server side. In the end I gave up and spent some time getting to grips with zend form decorators and got the layout I needed using them. –  Ash Vince Aug 7 '12 at 15:09
    
Ah, I'm glad you got the decorators to work. I really dislike using them. I feel like they break the MVC pattern, they don't give good enough results for how much work they take, and the designers who care about styling would rather use jquery anyway ( and so would I :) ). –  Seth Battin Aug 7 '12 at 19:37

It seems the answer to this problem is that you HAVE to use decorators in Zend Framework 1.

You might think that viewScripts are a solution but it seems if you go down that route then you are opening a can of worms as you will end up having to create different view scripts for buttons, file elements, text inputs, selects, radios and checkboxes as they all need slightly different things passes to the built in helpers that actually render the element. At least using decorators you can avoid a certain amount of replication of layout in each script buy just adding or removing the decorators.

It looks like they are abandoning the decorator approach in ZF2 though to go with something more fitting with MVC.

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