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right now I'm trying to make the battleship board game as practice, and I've been using classes for the most part with a few misc standalone functions. Everything below is a standalone. I can't wrap my mind around it, this works if I attack ships in order from last to first in the list, but if you go in any other order it breaks saying the list index doesn't exist. Please help.

Basically my system is whenever a ship is "hit" (the move is in the same position as one in the shipList) then it adds a hitList. What these functions is check if any of the items in the hitList against the known positions of the ships...created in a separate list when ship object is made. i been trying to make this work for 2 days

def checkForSunk(shipList, hitList):

    #Lists is something like this [[0,1],[0,2],[0,3]]
    #ShipList[0] is list, [1] is name of ship
    #ShipList is ALL ships.

    print 'SHIPLIST : %s' % (shipList)
    #[[[[0,1],[0,2],[0,3],[0,4],[0,5],[],[]], 'Destroyer'], [[[0,1],[0,2],[0,3],[0,4],[0,5],[],[]], 'Destroyer'], [[[0,1],[0,2],[0,3],[0,4],[0,5],[],[]], 'Destroyer']]

    #[[[0,1],[0,2],[0,3],[0,4],[0,5],[],[]], 'Destroyer']
    #   0                                       1
    print 'HITLIST : %s ' % (hitList)
    for j in range(len(shipList)):
        for i in shipList[j][0]:
            if i in hitList:
                print 'True in ship # %s' % (shipList[j][1])
                del shipList[j][0][shipList[j][0].index(i)] #Delete that part of the ship from the list.
    #Check if there's any empty ships, and delete the ship if there are.
    for j in range(len(shipList)):
        print shipList[j] #Problem around here!!!!!!!!!!!!
        if listIsEmpty(shipList[j][0]):
            print '%s has been sunk!' % (shipList[j][1])
            del shipList[j]


def isGameOver(shiplist):
    if shiplist == []:
        return True
    else:
        return False

def listIsEmpty(list):
    for i in range(len(list)):
        if list[i] != []: #If it finds anything thats not empty, return False. Else true
            return False
        else:
            return True

Am I going about it all wrong? Should I be physically deleting lists?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Have a look to this issue: stackoverflow.com/questions/2057419/… –  gecco Aug 1 '12 at 11:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The answer is the same as for issue Python: delete item in a list using a for-loop :

Iterate backwards:

for j in range(len(shipList) - 1, -1, -1):
share|improve this answer
    
cant it be done by for j in reversed(shipList): ? –  Inbar Rose Aug 1 '12 at 11:56
    
yes, but this creates a new list instead of looping through the existent (performance) -- EDIT: You are correct: reverse returns an iterator, not a new list. BUT notice that in his case j is an index, not the ship-object itself ... so the reversed method is not really helping here- –  gecco Aug 1 '12 at 12:02
    
I think you have the same case as before if you then sink ships from first to last... –  Emmanuel Aug 1 '12 at 12:12

im sorry i can not provide you with solution code, as you have not provided enough information or code for me to fix for you. but i have provided code examples that might help you understand the lists.

#a list with 10 object
mylist = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10]
print mylist
>>> 
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]
#if i print the 6th object:
print mylist[5]
>>> 
6
#if i delete an object from the end:
del mylist[9]
print mylist
>>>
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
#as you can see, the item is gone, and the list only has 9 objects.

#if i print the 6th object:
print mylist[5]
>>> 
6

#but if i delete an item from the middle
del mylist[4]
print mylist
>>>
[1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9]
#i now have 8 objects as expected, but the objects location in the list has changed.

#if i print the 6th object:
print mylist[5]
>>> 
7

i hope this helps

share|improve this answer

If I understand well, your hitlist contains all hits (meaning, you don't check at each move): if so, gecco is right with the symptom: you cannot remove elements in a list while iterating on it (that invalidates indexes). But reversing the list would not fix this though, as you would have the same problem if you sink ships from first to last.

If you don't want to change your code too much, replacing del shipList[j] by shipList[j][0] = None (you don't delete list elements, so iteration remains valid) and then just redefine function isGameOver:

def isGameOver(shiplist):
    ret = True
    for ship in shiplist:
        if shiplist[0] is not None:
            ret = False
            break
    return ret
share|improve this answer

The bug you met has been explained in @gecco answer.

Avoid using nested loop can make the code easy to understand.

for example, the following function is wrong, since it will only check the first element in the list.

def listIsEmpty(list):
    for i in range(len(list)):
        if list[i] != []: #If it finds anything thats not empty, return False. Else true
            return False
        else:
            return True

it can be written as

def listIsEmpty(alist):
    return not any(alist)

and the checkForSunk function

#Check if there's any empty ships, and delete the ship if there are.
for j in range(len(shipList)):
    print shipList[j] #Problem around here!!!!!!!!!!!!
    if listIsEmpty(shipList[j][0]):
        print '%s has been sunk!' % (shipList[j][1])
        del shipList[j]

could be written as

# sometimes use filter can make thing easier.
shipList = [k for k in shipList if not listIsEmpty(k[0])]
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