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I have an area in which I want to add two buttons inside in. The code is pretty straight:

<div id="switcher"> 
 <div class="button" id="Sunday">Sunday</div>
 <div class="button" id="mic">mic</div>
 </div>

The demo is at http://jsfiddle.net/zhshqzyc/vBbeQ/

If we use the same CSS, but rewrite the code of the two elements in one line:

<div id="switcher"> 
<div class="button" id="Sunday">Sunday</div><div class="button" id="mic">mic</div>
</div>

The demo is at http://jsfiddle.net/zhshqzyc/vBbeQ/1/ It seems that there is a line break in the first case but jsfiddle can't recongize it.

Is it the bug of jsfiddle?

Thanks.

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's happening because of the width of the switcher DIV.

When you write your code with a line break it will be printed a little 'whitespace' between the DIVs. And the width of the 2 button DIVs plus the 'whitespace', is bigger than the width of the switcher div.

See here

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cool.. i learnt something today. –  CraftyFella Aug 1 '12 at 12:38
    
So a line break equals how many whitespace? –  Love Aug 1 '12 at 12:38
1  
I believe it counts as 1 space. You can tell by drag-selecting in the browser - you should see a space between the elements. –  Olly Hodgson Aug 1 '12 at 12:40
    
No matter how many "line breaks" between 2 DIVs, it will print just 1 whitespace. You can find some ways to prevent the whitespace between the inline-block elements here: css-tricks.com/fighting-the-space-between-inline-block-elements –  void Aug 1 '12 at 12:52
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No, this is just how display: inline-block; works. It's sensitive to whitespace around the elements (just like display: inline;), so this:

<div id="switcher">
    <div class="button" id="Sunday">Sunday</div>
<div class="button" id="mic">mic</div>
</div>

Is different to this:

<div id="switcher">
    <div class="button" id="Sunday">Sunday</div><div class="button" id="mic">mic</div>
</div>

This effects rendering because browsers will render a space between the two .button elements. As a result they no longer fit on the same line.

There's loads more about inline-block at http://designshack.net/articles/css/whats-the-deal-with-display-inline-block/

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It's not because they're on the same line, but because you have no whitespace between the two DIVs. Change the second one to:

<div class="button" id="Sunday">Sunday</div> <div class="button" id="mic">mic</div>

and it behaves just like the first one. This has nothing to do with jsfiddle, it's just the way HTML works: if there's no separator, it won't break the line.

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