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In my iOS application,I have one xml file with thousands of locations data. I need to convert it to kml format to show heat maps on my map view. How can I convert it? Please give me guidelines for this conversion...

<?xml version="1.0"?>
    <row id="1">
        <id>101</id>
            <name>Sharon Appartments</name>
            <longitude>115.23412</longitude>
            <latitude>34.734121</latitude>
            <city>Dallas</city>
            <state>California</state>
            <country>USA</country>
     </row>
     <row id="2">
     .
     .
     .
     .
     <row id="20000">
     .
     .
     </row>
</xml>
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any convertors to convert it? –  smily Aug 1 '12 at 13:22

1 Answer 1

Since you asked for guidelines, an example kml document looks like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
<Document>
<Placemark>
  <name>New York City</name>
  <description>New York City</description>
  <Point>
    <coordinates>-74.006393,40.714172,0</coordinates>
  </Point>
</Placemark>
</Document>
</kml>

It seems you can keep the <name> field the same, you can combine the items in xml fields <city,<state>,<country> to klm field <address>city,state,country</address> or use it as a kml <description> tag (User-supplied content that appears in the description balloon ) as kml will use long and lat to determine a point if it is provided instead of using an address. Transform the xml <longitute>,<latitudite> need to be turned into a kml <point><cordinates>longitute,latatude</cordinates></point>

So you need to transform your klm document into something like this:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<kml xmlns="http://www.opengis.net/kml/2.2">
<Document>
<Placemark>
  <name>Sharon Appartments</name>
  <description>Dallas, California, USA</description>
  <Point>
    <coordinates>115.23412,34.734121</coordinates>
  </Point>
</Placemark>
<Placement>
Put item 2 details here
</Placement>
.
.
.
<Placement>
Put item 20000 details here
</Placement>
</Document>
</kml>

I got this from the https://developers.google.com/kml/documentation/kmlreference ,

Now for the heat map part, if you can transform your file into a list of lat and longs, you can put it into the python program on this webpage: http://jjguy.com/heatmap/ and it will produce a kml overlay for google maps based on that data, you need to combine that overlay with your kml file for your city data to get a complete map.

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Do I manually convert the entire data because i have thousands of records? I tried to look for convertors but I didn't find any... –  smily Aug 1 '12 at 13:48
    
Programmaticly, you could use a small python script that reads a few tags and then saves it in the new format, or you could write an en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XML_transformation_language file that would transform it. If you want to do it manually, which wouldn't be hard, use a text editor like Geany and use find an replace and checkbox the "use escape sequences". Find <longitude> and replace with <point><coordinates>, find </longitude>\r\n<latitude> and replace with a comma, with \r\n being your line return for your OS(could be \r, \n, ect depending on what the file is using", ect. –  gmlime Aug 1 '12 at 14:05
    
The problem would come from the <row id="2"> fields and you would need to use a regexp for that in geany. Of course this is just a guildline, I personally would just modify the heatmap.py file from that website jiguy.com/heatmap to read my xml file and spit out the correct kml. –  gmlime Aug 1 '12 at 14:06
    
I think the regexp would be similar <row id=(.?)> and replace would be ", but I don't use regexp enough to ever remember it. I hope this gives you some things to think about and helps guide you towards an answer which is exactly what you asked for. –  gmlime Aug 1 '12 at 14:12
    
Thanks for your suggestion.. hope it will help to solve it.. –  smily Aug 1 '12 at 14:13

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