Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Don't close it as duplicate, since I have a subtle but significant change from the similiar questions:

Is it possible to capture output of an external process (i.e. stdout) in java, when I didn't create the process, and all I know is the process name?

I'm running on windows 7.

EDIT:

If there is a way to do it in other language (C#\C++), then I can write a "CaptureOutput" program that capture the output, write to stdout, and in my java code to launch "CaptureOutput" and read its stdput.

Ugly, but might work.

So answer in other languages is also okay with me.

share|improve this question
    
Are you running it on unix? –  amicngh Aug 1 '12 at 13:25
    
@amicngh I'm running on Windows 7 –  sara Aug 1 '12 at 13:29
    
do you have access to other process to trigger from any where like java –  amicngh Aug 1 '12 at 13:39
    
@amicngh Sorry, I didn't understand your meaning... –  sara Aug 1 '12 at 13:45

4 Answers 4

What you are trying to do is pretty dangerous. It would be very easy to accidentally corrupt the memory of process you're trying to get into. Test, test, test. Then test some more. And good luck - I know I wouldn't want to have to pull this off.

This article - API Hooking - explains how to get started with what you want (using C++). Once you have your code injected into a running process, there are other Windows API calls to replace STDOUT (e.g. SetStdHandle).

share|improve this answer

Do you have any control over when the process starts? If so, you could start the process and have it pipe its stdout to a file which could be read or to another program you write that could log it in a database, event viewer, etc.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I don't have control. As I said: I didn't create the process. –  sara Aug 5 '12 at 7:24
    
Could you compile this other process? –  RichardJohnn Aug 6 '12 at 12:34
    
No :(, I get it compiled.... –  sara Aug 7 '12 at 15:57

First let me say that what you're asking breaks all the rules of process isolation. If your process does not create the process whose output you want to capture, and you also don't have access to modify the calling process (command shell? service manager? you haven't said which). Then your only chance, and it is a slim one at best, is to inject a thread into the process and while all its other threads are suspended, alter the global stdout (and stderr?). This can only be done by a process with full access privileges to the target process. Performing such surgery on a running process is not for the faint of heart.

share|improve this answer
    
Another extreme alternative would be to extract all the runtime information you can about the process, kill the original and start your own copy with the redirection you want. That would probably be frowned upon though... –  dex black Aug 12 '12 at 0:06
    
Further refs await the keen/desperate querant. –  dex black Aug 12 '12 at 0:12
    
A combination of SetStdHandle and Three-Ways-to-Inject-Your-Code-into-Another-Proces on codeproject might get you there. I must stress "might get you there". Sorry but I have to say this is just a bad idea. Find a log file solution or talk to the developers of the program or the sysadmin or something. –  dex black Aug 12 '12 at 0:18
    
Abandon all hope all ye who enter here. Said the sign above the cave entrance... –  dex black Aug 12 '12 at 0:19

Under Linux, check out the operating system's IPC mechanisms such as message queues, pipes, shared memory, and sockets. These mechanisms allow for Inter-process communication. Although, if your particularly interested in a program's output, a work-around could just have the first process output the data out to disk onto a file, and read with a separate process. In this way, you could use multiple languages for the task. A simple example would be to have C++ write some data out to a file, and use JAVA read/use the data, given the same file. Hope I came close to answering, if at all.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.