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How can I add data/functions to all instances of a javascript object created by a constructor so that all instances have the same reference and not a copy of it?

Basically implementing the equivalent of a static method in C#.

For example, given the following code which creates a Widget class.

(function() {

    var Widget = function() {
    };

    Widget.prototype.init = function(data) {
        this.data = data;
    };

    this.Widget = Widget;
}).call(this);
var instance1 = new Widget();
instance1.init('inst1');
var instance2 = new Widget();
instance2.init('inst2');

alert(instance1.data); // inst1
alert(instance2.data); // inst2

In the above case each instance has it's own copy of the data property. However I want to add a function that sets data for all current and future instances.

My current solution is to add a function to the constructor function object, not to it's prototype. See below for example. Is there any pitfalls to this and is there a better way?

(function() {

    var Widget = function() {
    };

    Widget.prototype.init = function(data) {
        this.data = data;
    };

    Widget.addStaticData = function(data) {
        this.staticData = data;
    };

    Widget.prototype.getStaticData = function() {
        return Widget.staticData;
    };

    this.Widget = Widget;
}).call(this);
var instance1 = new Widget();
instance1.init('inst1');

Widget.addStaticData('static');

var instance2 = new Widget();
instance2.init('inst2');

alert(instance1.data); // inst1
alert(instance2.data); // inst2
alert(instance1.getStaticData()); // static
alert(instance2.getStaticData()); // static
share|improve this question
    
Is appears as if you forgot to declare the Widget variable. –  Šime Vidas Aug 1 '12 at 13:50
    
Btw, are you defining Widget as a global property? (Is this the global object?) –  Šime Vidas Aug 1 '12 at 13:58
    
Yes Widget is set as a global property. call(this) is executing the anon function passing the global namespace (window) to the function. I did however forget the var in front of Widgets (I usually have a namespace there so am used to leaving it out). –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:06
    
The use of global variables should be minimized, since each global variable introduces a risk of a name collision. I recommend that you create a namespace (e.g. window.MYAPP = {};), and add your variables to that namespace instead of defining them as globals (e.g. MYAPP.Widget = ...;). –  Šime Vidas Aug 1 '12 at 14:10
    
Usually I would use a namespace however this will be a Javascript widget (e.g. CodeMirror) so I intend to have one global variable (which is no more or less than namespacing really). –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:14
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Three pitfalls that I can think of:

  • methodological: the prototype is the place for shared, reused, inherited functionality/properties - utilise it as such

  • performance: it is quicker to inherit than to set each time on an instance. John Resig (jQuery creator) did some benchmarking on this in a blog post that I appear unable to find at present.

  • losing the split between inherited and own properties. If you apply everything to an instance via the constructor, everything is an instance property.

Everything via constructor:

function Dog() { this.legs = 4; }
var fido = new Dog();
fido.name = 'Fido';
for (var i in fido) if (fido.hasOwnProperty(i)) alert(i+' = '+fido[i]);

...alerts both properties as they are deemed the instance's own.

Via prototype and constructor

function Dog2() { }
Dog2.prototype.legs = 4;
var fido = new Dog2();
fido.name = 'Fido';
for (var i in fido) if (fido.hasOwnProperty(i)) alert(i+' = '+fido[i]);

...alerts just name because that is the only instance property. (Nonetheless, fido.legs is retrievable - but it comes from the prototype).

[EDIT - in response to the OP's commet below]

If you want a static method, then that should be added to the function after its declaration.

function Dog() {}
Dog.static = function() {}
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, don't think I explained the question clearly. I've updated it. I'm try to implement what is the equivalent to a static method in c#. –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:05
    
See edit - any better? –  Utkanos Aug 1 '12 at 14:07
    
Yeah that's better. Exactly what I have: Widget.addStaticData. I haven't really seen this pattern used elsewhere and since I came up with myself I'm a bit worried about any side effects I haven't thought of that will haunt me later. Have you seen this done elsewhere? –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:11
    
You mean this way of adding static members? Absolutely - it's the standard way. –  Utkanos Aug 1 '12 at 14:13
    
Thanks, I guess I was just looking for confirmation and couldn't find a similar question when I searched. –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:15
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Consider a local variable staticData instead of the Widget.staticData property. That way, an external command won't be able to write the data directly, so the only way to write it will be through the addStaticData function:

(function () {
    var Widget = function () {};
    var staticData;

    Widget.addStaticData = function ( obj ) {
        staticData = obj.data;
    };

    Widget.prototype.init = function () {
        var data = staticData;
        // use data
        // or just use the staticData variable directly
    };

    this.Widget = Widget;
}).call( this );

With your code, one could just execute this:

Widget.staticData = { data: 'COMPROMISED!' };

to change the static data. Since you have a dedicated function for setting the static data, you probably don't want it to be possible to change the static data in other ways.

With my code, the above statement has no effect, and the static data can only be changed via the addStaticData function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I don't think I was clear enough in my original question. I've updated it. –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:17
    
@ChrisHerring Your question is "Are there any pitfalls to this?". I laid out one pitfall in my answer. If you have a Widget.setData() function, then it should not be possible to set the data in any other way. If you can just do Widget.data = ...;, then that's bad design. My answer shows how to correct that bad design. –  Šime Vidas Aug 1 '12 at 14:19
    
You're right, I misread your answer. Same idea as the module pattern. Thanks. –  Chris Herring Aug 1 '12 at 14:31
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