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I know that strcmp returns...

A value greater than zero indicates that the first character that does not match has a greater value in str1 than in str2; And a value less than zero indicates the opposite.

But what do those positive or negative numbers mean? for example what does 2 mean?

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If it returns 2, it just might mean that the difference between the character codes is 2. Or something else. –  Bo Persson Aug 1 '12 at 13:53
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4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

In short, nothing. It usually depends on how the function is implemented, but you can't rely on it.

For instance, in the implementation they talk about here (3rd post): http://compsci.ca/v3/viewtopic.php?t=24383 it returns the difference between (the numeric representations of) the first differing characters, i.e. strcmp("ab","ad") would return -2.

Alternately, for this implementation, http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/C_Programming/Strings#The_strcmp_function the same call would return -1.

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A value greater than zero indicates that the first character that does not match has a greater value in str1 than in str2

and

2 > 0

so

2 indicates that the first character that does not match has a greater value in str1 than in str2

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The standard doesn't tell you what specific numbers mean. Each implementation is allowed to return whatever it likes as long as it returns greater, equal, or less than zero as appropriate.

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Only the signum of the returned integer is meaningful. Although it's usually -1, 0 and +1 (respectively) in most implementations, the exact value is never to be relied upon.

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