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I was surprised to see in a objective-c project, the following line codes

- (void)methodName
{
    ... some code...

    {
        ... some code
    }

    {
        ... some code
    }

}

What does the inner brackets stand for ? They seems not be preceded by any statement. thanks

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The brackets create a new scope. Variables defined within the scope will not persist after the end of the scope. I personally use this to separate out bits of logic to make things easier to read.

Example 1

This example demonstrates the lack of access to variables instantiated inside of a more narrowly defined scope.

-(void)blockTestA {
    int j = 25;

    {
        int k = 5;

        // You can access both variables 'j' and 'k' inside this block.
    }

    // You can only access the variable 'j' here.
}

Example 2

This example demonstrates how creating a new block scope allows us to have different variables with the same name. You can read more about scope here.

-(void)blockTestB {
    int j = 25;

    {
        int j = 5;
        NSLog(@"j inside block is: %i", j); // Prints '5'
    }

    NSLog(@"j outside of block is: %i", j); // Prints '25'
}
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Good to know, since i've wondered at such code - but what is the convention for using these - is there any case in which they'd really be needed, and are they common in objective-c or a throwback to C? –  Rhubarb Oct 2 '12 at 18:25
    
There isn't a convention for using these. It's kind of like the switch ... case and if ... else statements. They both work fairly similarly, so it's usually just a matter of personal preference. They are necessary in several very normal instances, you just may not think of them in this way. (Examples: defining the implementation of a new selector, defining blocks, try ... catch blocks) Almost all other uses are semi-optional (i.e. you could implement a for loop with or without, but only if the immediately contained logic is a single line.) Creating a new block scope is supported by C. –  FreeAsInBeer Oct 2 '12 at 19:38

The inner brackets limit the scope of variables declared inside of them.

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They create a block scope. Declared variables inside those blocks will not be available outside the blocks.

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- (void)methodName
{
    ... some code...

    {
      int i;//the scope of i is within this block only
        ... some code
    }

    {
       int i;//the scope of i is within this block only
       ... some code
    }

}

I think it will be helpful to you.

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