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I'm a huge fan of ES5's Function.prototype.bind and currying arguments (basically creating default arguments for functions).

I was fooling around with that a bit, but I can't for the life of me figure out my own construct anymore. This is my playground:

function hello( arg1, arg2 ) {
    console.log('hello()');
    console.log('"this" is: ', this);
    console.log('arguments: ', arguments);
}

var foo = Function.prototype.call.bind( hello,{what: 'dafuq'}, 2 );
foo( 42 );

The log output for this is as follows:

hello()
"this" is: Object{ what="dafuq" }
arguments: [2,42]

But I don't understand how on earth the {what: 'dafuq'} object makes its way as a reference for the this within foo. As far as I understand it, we are creating a bound call to Function.prototype.call. Lets check the MDN synopsis for .bind() quickly:

fun.bind(thisArg[, arg1[, arg2[, ...]]])

so, thisArg for .call is the hello function, followed by the arguments list. Basically what happens is this

Function.prototype.call.call( hello, {what: 'dafuq'}, 2);

...uuhhh now my brain hurts a little. I think I have an idea now what happens, but please someone find nice solid words to explain it in detail.

  • how {what: 'dafuq'} becomes the this reference
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

But I don't understand how on earth the {what: 'dafuq'} object makes its way as a reference for the this within foo

It's because foo is effectively the call method with the hello function bound as the calling context, and that object bound as the first argument. The first argument of .call sets the calling context of its calling context. Since you've bound it, it means that object always be the calling context.


Put it this way...

You've bound the calling context of .call to hello.

This is effectively the same as doing...

   hello.call();
// or...
// Function.prototype.call.call(hello);

You've also bound the first argument of .call to {what: "dafuq"}, so this is effectively the same as doing...

hello.call({what: "dafuq"});
// or...
// Function.prototype.call.call(hello, {what: "dafuq"});

And finally, you've bound the second argument of .call to 2, so this is effectively the same as doing...

hello.call({what: "dafuq"}, 2);
// or...
// Function.prototype.call.call(hello, {what: "dafuq"}, 2);
share|improve this answer
    
yes foo is the call method, but we never call foo.call( thisArg ) right ? we just call it directly by (). I don't get it :p –  jAndy Aug 1 '12 at 14:16
    
@jAndy: You bound the first argument of .call using .bind to your object. So since this "version" of .call has a bound first argument, it'll always use that as the calling context. –  squint Aug 1 '12 at 14:16
    
the bound "version" of .call() should have hello as thisArg, no ? After that, we execute that bound .call() just passing in formal parameters. Doh, well might be I'm just mentally blocked here, still figuring it. –  jAndy Aug 1 '12 at 14:21
    
@jAndy: You've bound the calling context of .call to hello. This is effectively the same as doing hello.call(). You've bound the first argument of call to {what: "dafuq"}. So this is effectively the same as hello.call({what: "dafuq"}). And finally, you've bound the second argument of .call to 2, so this is effectively the same as hello.call({what: "dafuq"}, 2) –  squint Aug 1 '12 at 14:23
    
@jAndy: You're welcome. I'm updating my answer with this explanation. –  squint Aug 1 '12 at 14:26

You're not calling .bind(thisArg, args), but
Function.prototype.bind.call(thisArgUsedByCall, thisArgUsedByBind, argument).

A different way to show what happens:

// thisArgUsedByCall is a function
Function.prototype.call(thisArgUsedByCall, ...)   // does the same as:
thisArgUsedByCall.bind(thisArgUsedByBind, argument);
share|improve this answer
    
ok, that makes it more obvious. Good answer. –  jAndy Aug 1 '12 at 14:22

The short answer is that bind consumes the first argument and uses it as this, but then call consumes its first argument (which was bind's second argument).

Bind works like this:

fun.bind(thisArg, argArgs...)(x, y, ...)

becomes

fun(argArgs..., x, y, ....) // this = thisArg

So

foo( 42 )

is

Function.prototype.call.bind( hello, { what: 'dafuq' }, 2 ) ( 42 )

which becomes

Function.prototype.call({ what: 'dafuq' }, 2, 42) // this = hello

Call works like this:

fun.call(thisArg, argArgs)

Becomes

fun(argArgs) // this = thisArg

so

call({ what: 'dafuq' }, 2, 42) // this = hello

becomes

hello(2, 42) // this = { what: 'dafuq' }
share|improve this answer
    
"(I don't know where that 5 comes from)" - Which five? –  Rob W Aug 1 '12 at 15:54
    
Looks like it got fixed - it was a typo in the main post. Edited my response in return. –  royh Aug 1 '12 at 15:58

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