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Type-parameterized field of a generic class becomes invisible after upgrading to Java 7

public class Test{

    private String _canYouSeeMe = "yes";

    <T extends Test> void genericMethod(T hey){
        String s = hey._canYouSeeMe;
    }

    void method(Test hey){
        String s = hey._canYouSeeMe;
    }   
}

When building against JDK 1.6 this compiles just fine but against 1.7 there is a compiler error in genericMethod(): The field Test._canYouSeeMe is not visible

The error can be resolved by making _canYouSeeMe protected rather than private, but I'm just wondering what has changed from 1.6 to 1.7

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marked as duplicate by Matt Ball, BalusC, assylias, MicSim, Joachim Sauer Aug 1 '12 at 14:55

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
error or warning? –  Nambari Aug 1 '12 at 14:25
    
why not? this is a method of the same class, isn't it? and non-static, too. –  Qnan Aug 1 '12 at 14:28
1  
@fmucar No, it shouldn't have compiled, you were right with that. It did, however. –  Daniel Fischer Aug 1 '12 at 14:33
2  
@assylias: actually, it doesn't make a lot of sense: If T is a subclass of Test then it's also a Test and we should be able to access Test._canYouSeeMe. Actually: casting hey to Test makes it work in Java 7. –  Joachim Sauer Aug 1 '12 at 14:33
6  
The answer is here: stackoverflow.com/q/7719843 –  MicSim Aug 1 '12 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

Subclasses (T) of a class (Test) never have access to the superclass' private fields. This was likely a bug in the Java 6 compiler that was fixed in Java 7.

Remember: T extends Test means that T is a subclass of Test. It does not mean that T's class is Test.class, which is the necessary condition for having private field & method access.

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this is partly true, but since the code accessing the private field is in the superclass itself, I would say it should have the access –  Qnan Aug 1 '12 at 14:34
1  
@Matt: I don't get it. If that were true, then why does casting hey to Test (which is entirely legitimate and doesn't even produce a warning) let's us access _canYouSeeMe? –  Joachim Sauer Aug 1 '12 at 14:35
    
+1 A number of bugs in Java 6 were not fixed until Java 7 to avoid causing an incompatibility. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 1 '12 at 14:36
    
Matt, so even though it's a static method (that uses generics), the compiler treats that as a generic class itself? –  Martin Snyder Aug 1 '12 at 14:36
1  
@JoachimSauer Because adding a field named _canYouSeeMe to the given subtype of Test would change the field access expression to refer to the new field. In this case, where the given type is a type variable, lowering the upper bound on the type variable could similarly change the meaning. Those bugs would creep up on us in utter silence. I for one welcome that particular door being firmly shut. –  Ben Schulz Aug 1 '12 at 21:11

In reply to @Joachim - too long for a comment.

It is consistent with the fact that this would not compile:

void method(SubTest hey) {
    String s = hey._canYouSeeMe;
}

(where SubTest extends Test) whereas this would compile

void method(SubTest hey) {
    String s = ((Test) hey)._canYouSeeMe;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The second example does not compile (in both Java 6 & 7) when SubTest is a top-level class. –  Matt Ball Aug 1 '12 at 14:46
    
@MattBall: why not? as long as SubTest extends Test. It compiles for me. –  Joachim Sauer Aug 1 '12 at 14:50
    
@MattBall if method is a member of Test, it does compile, even if SubTest is a top level class. –  assylias Aug 1 '12 at 14:56
1  
@assylias yes, it compiles iff method is a member of Test. –  Matt Ball Aug 1 '12 at 15:09
    
@MattBall Yes - you can't access a private member of Test outside of Test (or its top level enclosing class if it is not a top level class itself). –  assylias Aug 1 '12 at 15:10

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