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Given a string as user input to a python function, I'd like to get a class object out of it if there's a class with that name in the currently defined namespace. Essentially, I want the implementation for a function which will produce this kind of result:

class Foo:
    pass

str_to_class("Foo")
==> <class __main__.Foo at 0x69ba0>

Is this possible?

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1  
There are some useful answers here, but I found the answer to this question particularly useful: stackoverflow.com/questions/452969/… –  Tom Oct 24 '13 at 0:45

7 Answers 7

up vote 31 down vote accepted

This seems simplest.

>>> class Foo(object):
...     pass
... 
>>> eval("Foo")
<class '__main__.Foo'>
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8  
Beaware the ramification of using eval. You better make sure the string you passed in is not from user. –  Overclocked Jul 18 '13 at 13:32
7  
Using eval() leaves the door open for arbitrary code execution, for security's sake it should be avoided. –  m.kocikowski Aug 20 '13 at 19:14
    
I don't like down-voting correct answers so i wont but eval should never be used in any circumstance –  Greg Sep 12 '13 at 18:33
12  
Eval does not leave the door open to anything. If you have malicious, evil users who might maliciously and evilly pass bad values to eval, they can just edit the python source. Since they can just edit the python source, the door is, was, and always will be open. –  S.Lott Sep 19 '13 at 12:18
8  
Unless the program in question is running on a server. –  Vatsu1 Nov 22 '13 at 21:04

This could work:

import sys

def str_to_class(str):
    return getattr(sys.modules[__name__], str)
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What will happen if the class does not exist? –  riza Jul 24 '09 at 7:23
    
It will only work for the class defined in the current module –  luc Jul 24 '09 at 7:24
17  
Sorry to raise this answer from the dead. @luc is right, but we can replace last line with return reduce(getattr, str.split("."), sys.modules[__name__]). This will give the same effect as eval() but won't allow to run arbitrary code. –  jollyroger Nov 25 '11 at 21:55

You could do something like:

globals()[class_name]
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2  
I like this better than the 'eval' solution because (1) it's just as easy, and (2) it doesn't leave you open to arbitrary code execution. –  mjumbewu May 11 '12 at 15:43
    
but you're using globals()... another thing that should be avoided –  Greg Sep 12 '13 at 18:34
    
@Greg Perhaps, but globals() is arguably far less bad than eval, and not really any worse than sys.modules[__name__] AFAIK. –  Laurence Gonsalves Sep 13 '13 at 22:18
    
Yeah I see your point, because you're only grabbing from it not setting anything –  Greg Sep 14 '13 at 7:03

You want the class "Baz", which lives in module "foo.bar". With python 2.7, you want to use importlib.import_module(), as this will make transitioning to python 3 easier:

import importlib

def class_for_name(module_name, class_name):
    # load the module, will raise ImportError if module cannot be loaded
    m = importlib.import_module(module_name)
    # get the class, will raise AttributeError if class cannot be found
    c = getattr(m, class_name)
    return c

With python < 2.7:

def class_for_name(module_name, class_name):
    # load the module, will raise ImportError if module cannot be loaded
    m = __import__(module_name, globals(), locals(), class_name)
    # get the class, will raise AttributeError if class cannot be found
    c = getattr(m, class_name)
    return c

Use:

loaded_class = class_for_name('foo.bar', 'Baz')
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1  
nice one, it works even when class is not originally imported in this module –  parxier Jul 16 '13 at 11:50
import sys
import types

def str_to_class(field):
    try:
        identifier = getattr(sys.modules[__name__], field)
    except AttributeError:
        raise NameError("%s doesn't exist." % field)
    if isinstance(identifier, (types.ClassType, types.TypeType)):
        return identifier
    raise TypeError("%s is not a class." % field)

This accurately handles both old-style and new-style classes.

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You don't need types.TypeType; it's just an alias for the builtin "type". –  Glenn Maynard Jul 24 '09 at 8:09
1  
Yeah I know, but I feel it's just clearer to read. I guess it just boils down to preference, though. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 24 '09 at 15:08

Yes, you can do this. Assuming your classes exist in the global namespace, something like this will do it:

import types

class Foo:
    pass

def str_to_class(s):
    if s in globals() and isinstance(globals()[s], types.ClassType):
            return globals()[s]
    return None

str_to_class('Foo')

==> <class __main__.Foo at 0x340808cc>
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1  
In Python 3, there is no more ClassType. –  riza Jul 24 '09 at 7:20
    
Use isinstance(x, type). –  Glenn Maynard Jul 24 '09 at 8:08

In terms of arbitrary code execution, or undesired user passed names, you could have a list of acceptable function/class names, and if the input matches one in the list, it is eval'd.

PS: I know....kinda late....but it's for anyone else who stumbles across this in the future.

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1  
If you're going to maintain the list, might as well maintain a dict from name to class instead. Then there's no need for eval(). –  Fasaxc Dec 19 '13 at 0:48

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