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Let's say I have two classes:

class A
{
    public:
    A* Hello()
    {
        return this;
    }
}

class B:public class A
{
    public:
    B* World()
    {
        return this;
    }
}

And let's say I have an instance of B class like so:

B test;

If I call test.World()->Hello() that would work fine. But test.Hello()->World() would not work since Hello() returns A type.

How could I make Hello() return the type of B? I don't want to use a virtual function since we have over 20 different classes inheriting A.

share|improve this question
    
20 different classes inheriting A isn't that many. You'll end up with 20 vtbls, and one vptr per instance (assuming that virtual dispatch is done that way on your compiler). Are you so resource-constrained that this is really a problem? –  Roger Lipscombe Aug 1 '12 at 14:42
1  
Laziness. When adding a method inside class A, you would have to go to all the classes and add the same method. –  Grapes Aug 1 '12 at 14:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can use CRTP:

template<class Derived>
class A
{
    public:
    Derived* Hello()
    {
        return static_cast<Derived*>(this);
    }
};

class B : public A<B>
{
    public:
    B* World()
    {
        return this;
    }
};


int main() {
    B test;
    test.World()->Hello();
    test.Hello()->World();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is almost perfect! Would you still be able to create an instance of A? I am assuming it would look like so: A<A> test; –  Grapes Aug 1 '12 at 14:40
    
Just be careful because you'll end up with a separate copy of class A for each class that inherits from it. If @Grapes is concerned about space usage, this may be far worse than adding a vtable for A. –  antonm Aug 1 '12 at 14:40
    
@Grapes I don't think the compiler will allow A<A>. You may want to rename A to A_base or something, and have plain A inherit from A_base. –  antonm Aug 1 '12 at 14:42
1  
@antonm here A is an empty class, so EBCO would imply no overhead here. –  mfontanini Aug 1 '12 at 14:42
    
@mfontanini you may be right on both points there. Especially if typename Derived is only used as a pointer type. –  antonm Aug 1 '12 at 14:44

You can have another Hello method in B, even if it isn't virtual:

class A
{
    public:
    A* Hello() { return this; }
}

class B:public class A
{
    public:
    B* Hello() { return this; }
    B* World() { return this; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Vaughn, I was trying to avoid that since every time you add a new method in class A, you'll need to go through all classes that inherit A and add the same method. Is there another way to do this? –  Grapes Aug 1 '12 at 14:35
    
@Grapes: I think mfontanini's answer is what you are looking for. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 1 '12 at 14:37
    
Will not work because you are not overriding the method and when you have A pointer A::Hello() will be called –  Andrew Aug 1 '12 at 14:38
    
@Andrew: In his example, test was a B. –  Vaughn Cato Aug 1 '12 at 14:39
    
@VaughnCato: ah, right, my mistake –  Andrew Aug 1 '12 at 14:41

It isn't necessary to make Hello() return a B*. Hello() is returning an A* and all you need to do is cast your A* to a B* to be able to call test.Hello()->World(). For example:

B* b = dynamic_cast<B*>(test.Hello());
if(b != 0) b->World();
share|improve this answer
    
I want to chain my calls like in the example, test->Hello()->World()->FunctionFromA()->FunctionFromB()->FunctionFromA2()->Func‌​tionFromB() so I am not sure this would work well for me.; –  Grapes Aug 1 '12 at 14:41

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