Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I count the number of different values (numbers and strings mixed) in a chosen (large) range in VBA?

I think about this in this way:
1. Read in data into one dimensional array.
2. Sort array (quick or merge sort) need to test which
3. Simply count number of different values if sorted array : if(a[i]<>a[i+1]) then counter=counter+1.

Is it the most efficient way to solve this problem?

Edit: I want to do it in Excel.

share|improve this question
1  
You can load the range into a 2D array, then loop though it and use a scripting dictionary to check for uniqueness. The dictionary has your count when you're done. –  Tim Williams Aug 1 '12 at 15:08
    
@TimWilliams you beat me to it, exactly my thought :) –  i_saw_drones Aug 1 '12 at 15:14
    
Three answers - nice I will check them and choose one in Friday. Thanks –  Qbik Aug 1 '12 at 15:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is a VBA Solution

You don't need an Array to get this done. You can also use a collection. Example

Sub Samples()
    Dim scol As New Collection

    With Sheets("Sheet1")
        For i = 1 To 100 '<~~ Assuming the range is from A1 to A100
            On Error Resume Next
            scol.Add .Range("A" & i).Value, Chr(34) & _
            .Range("A" & i).Value & Chr(34)
            On Error GoTo 0
        Next i
    End With

    Debug.Print scol.Count

    'For Each itm In scol
    '   Debug.Print itm
    'Next
End Sub

FOLLOWUP

Sub Samples()
    Dim scol As New Collection
    Dim MyAr As Variant

    With Sheets("Sheet1")
        '~~> Select your range in a column here
        MyAr = .Range("A1:A10").Value

        For i = 1 To UBound(MyAr)
            On Error Resume Next
            scol.Add MyAr(i, 1), Chr(34) & _
            MyAr(i, 1) & Chr(34)
            On Error GoTo 0
        Next i
    End With

    Debug.Print scol.Count

    'For Each itm In scol
    '   Debug.Print itm
    'Next
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice to add that you don't need any special libraries to use a Collection object, which can make things easier. :-) –  Gaffi Aug 1 '12 at 17:29
3  
+1 Good answer! It's still slow to iterate over objects (i.e. Range objects) versus arrays, so copying to a variant array and then adding to the collection is much faster (sorry I'm an Excel performance Geek!) –  i_saw_drones Aug 1 '12 at 22:03
    
@i_saw_drones good point do you want to optimize it ? –  Qbik Aug 2 '12 at 7:40
1  
@Qbik: I have updated my post. –  Siddharth Rout Aug 2 '12 at 14:50
    
@i_saw_drones: Yes you are right. The looping was just an example. In real life scenario I would have used an array as in my example above. –  Siddharth Rout Aug 2 '12 at 14:51

Instead of steps 2 and 3, perhaps you could use a Scripting.Dictionary and add each value to the dictionary. Any duplicate entries would cause a runtime error which you could either trap or ignore (resume next). Finally, you could then just return the dictionary's count which would give you the count of unique entries.

Here's a scrap of code I hurriedly threw together:

Function UniqueEntryCount(SourceRange As Range) As Long

    Dim MyDataset As Variant
    Dim dic As Scripting.Dictionary
    Set dic = New Scripting.Dictionary

    MyDataset = SourceRange

    On Error Resume Next

    Dim i As Long

    For i = 1 To UBound(MyDataset, 1)

        dic.Add MyDataset(i, 1), ""

    Next i

    On Error GoTo 0

    UniqueEntryCount = dic.Count

    Set dic = Nothing

End Function

I know that resume next can be considered a 'code smell', but the alternative could be to use the exists function of the dictionary to test whether the specified key already exists and then add the value if did not. I just have a feeling that when I did a similar thing in the past that it was faster to just ignore any errors raised for duplicate keys rather than using exists YMMY. For completeness, here's the other method using exists:

Function UniqueEntryCount(SourceRange As Range) As Long

    Dim MyDataset As Variant
    Dim dic As Scripting.Dictionary
    Set dic = New Scripting.Dictionary

    MyDataset = SourceRange

    Dim i As Long

    For i = 1 To UBound(MyDataset, 1)

        if not dic.Exists(MyDataset(i,1)) then dic.Add MyDataset(i, 1), ""

    Next i

    UniqueEntryCount = dic.Count

    Set dic = Nothing

End Function

Whilst the above code is simpler than your proposed method, it would be worth to test the performance of it against your solution.

share|improve this answer

Building on the idea presented by i_saw_drones, I strongly recommend the Scripting.Dictionary. However, this can be done without On Error Resume Next as shown below. Also, his example requires linking the Microsoft Scripting Runtime library. My example will demonstrate how to do this without needing to do any linking.

Also, since you're doing this in Excel, then you don't need to create the array in step 1 at all. The function below will accept a range of cells, which will be iterated through completely.

(i.e. UniqueCount = UniqueEntryCount(ActiveSheet.Cells) or UniqueCount = UniqueEntryCount(MySheet.Range("A1:D100"))

Function UniqueEntryCount(SourceRange As Range) As Long
    Dim MyDataset As Variant
    Dim MyRow As Variant
    Dim MyCell As Variant
    Dim dic As Object
    Dim l1 As Long, l2 As Long

    Set dic = CreateObject("Scripting.Dictionary")
    MyDataset = SourceRange

    For l1 = 1 To UBound(MyDataset)
        ' There is no function to get the UBound of the 2nd dimension 
        ' of an array (that I'm aware of), so use this division to 
        ' get this value. This does not work for >=3 dimensions!
        For l2 = 1 To SourceRange.Count / UBound(MyDataset)
            If Not dic.Exists(MyDataset(l1, l2)) Then
                dic.Add MyDataset(l1, l2), MyDataset(l1, l2)
            End If
        Next l2
    Next l1

    UniqueEntryCount = dic.Count
    Set dic = Nothing
End Function

It might also be important to note that the above will count a null string "" as a distinct value. If you do not want this to be the case, simply change the code to this:

    For l1 = 1 To UBound(MyDataset)
        For l2 = 1 To SourceRange.Count / UBound(MyDataset)
            If Not dic.Exists(MyDataset(l1, l2)) And MyDataset(l1, l2) <> "" Then
                dic.Add MyDataset(l1, l2), MyDataset(l1, l2)
            End If
        Next l2
    Next l1
share|improve this answer
1  
From a performance point of view, I would not recommend iterating through every cell (i.e. object) and performing an implicit type coercion to variant, as looping through objects is computationally expensive. This is why it is more performant to coerce it to an array and loop through the array. Microsoft also recommend this: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/office/ff726673.aspx - section entitled "Read and Write Large Blocks of Data in a Single Operation" –  i_saw_drones Aug 1 '12 at 16:36
    
@i_saw_drones I agree. :-) I just thought I'd throw it out there as an option. I also wanted to plagiarize you as little as possible. ;-) –  Gaffi Aug 1 '12 at 17:02
    
@i_saw_drones Yes, you can perform the 2D array coercion, which can be done within my version of your function (updated my answer), rather than having to pass a 1D array/range to the function. –  Gaffi Aug 1 '12 at 17:41
    
Good point and good idea :) Nice answer! BTW UBound accepts an extra parameter for the dimension you wish to find the upper bound for (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg278658.aspx) –  i_saw_drones Aug 1 '12 at 18:08
    
@i_saw_drones I saw you do that, but I didn't know what it was. Shame on me for not researching better. ;-) At least now I know. Thanks! Then of course, you can expand that to a >=3D array very simply. –  Gaffi Aug 1 '12 at 18:56

Sorry this is written in C#. This is how I would do it.

// first copy the array so you don't lose any data
List<value> copiedList = new List<value>(yourArray.ToList());

//for through your list so you test every value
for (int a = 0; a < copiedList.Count; a++)
{
  // copy instances to a new list so you can count the values and do something with them
  List<value> subList = new List<value>(copiedList.FindAll(v => v == copiedList[i]);

  // do not do anything if there is only 1 value found
  if(subList.Count > 1)
                        // You would want to leave 1 'duplicate' in
    for (int i = 0; i < subList.Count - 1; i++)
        // remove every instance from the array but one
        copiedList.Remove(subList[i]);
}
int count = copiedList.Count; //this is your actual count

Have not tested it, please try.

You should wrap this inside a method so there is no messing around with the garbage. Otherwise you would lose the copy of the array only later. (return count)

EDIT: You need a list for this to work, use Array.ToList();

share|improve this answer
    
if (subArray.count > 1) check is not necessary, the for loop accounts for it. –  AmazingDreams Aug 1 '12 at 15:00
2  
How does answering a VBA question in C# help? ;) –  Siddharth Rout Aug 1 '12 at 15:17
    
Code can be 'translated' right –  AmazingDreams Aug 1 '12 at 15:21
    
And if the user doesn't know c# then how will that help? –  Siddharth Rout Aug 1 '12 at 15:22
1  
You are missing the point AmazingDreams :) –  Siddharth Rout Aug 1 '12 at 15:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.