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I've been working on my own SQL library/ Query builder for a little while. (https://github.com/aviat4ion/Query) For the most part, I'm pretty happy with how things work.

The one problem is with query joins.

Say something like

$db->join($table, 'table1.field1=table2.field2', 'inner');

I'm rather stumped as to how to parse the second argument, which needs to properly escape table identifiers.

I want to be able to handle functions in the condition as well.

My current implementation is rather naive - spliting the conditional on spaces, so 'table1.field1=table2.field2' would fail, and 'table1.field1 = table2.field2' would work.

Each database driver has a function to abstract the identifier escaping, which works on table identifiers like database.table.field, so that it is escaped as "database"."table"."field".

So my basic problem is this: how to parse out identifiers to escape them in the join conditional.

Edit:

I need to do this in a way that can be used for MySQL, Postgres, SQLite, and Firebird.

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Why don't you look at some of the many open source ORM's out there and see how they do it? ...Doctrine2...ReadBeanPHP –  cillosis Aug 1 '12 at 15:23
    
@cillosis I'm not sure an ORM is really helpful here. I'm generating sql statements, not mapping them to objects. –  timw4mail Aug 1 '12 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you only want to parse the where expression, a simple operator-precedence parser will do the trick. You have to apply a few checks on the parse tree to ensure the expression is valid, but this is not hard.

You can download an excellent guide to parsing in general here http://dickgrune.com/Books/PTAPG_1st_Edition/ ("Parsing Techniques - A Practical Guide "). Precedence parsing is covered in 9.2 PRECEDENCE PARSING, page 187.

The technique assumes you have 2 things:

  1. a tokenizer. this should recognize tokens like: identifiers/keywords, numbers, operators, whitespace/comments etc.
  2. a precedence table.

You read tokens from the tokenizer, one by one. When you find the token is an operator (you know it is because those are stored in the precedence table) then you determine whether the current token has a higher or lower precedence than the previous operator. If the current operator's precedence is lower than the previous token's precedence, then you have to write the previous operator, along with it's operands, to the parse tree, and look back from there to find what the previous operator of the formerly previous operator was. These operations work best if the tokenizer delivers the tokens as a double-linked list so that you can easily traverse the tokens.

If this all sounds to hard, then either:

  1. use an existing SQL parser. See for example http://code.google.com/p/php-sql-parser/
  2. reconsider your API.

Regarding option #2, Instead of allowing people to specify expressions as raw text, you could require them to pass it in as an array, or as a easily parsible format like JSON or even XML.

for instance, you could have it like this:

$db->join->inner($table, array(
    '=' => array(
        'left' => array (
            'table' => 'tab1'
        ,   'column' => 'col1' 
        )
    ,   'right' => array (
            'table' => 'tab2'
        ,   'column' => 'col2' 
        )
    )
));
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That's a great thing to look into, thanks. But I do wonder if I need a full blown parser, or if there might be a simpler approach. –  timw4mail Aug 1 '12 at 15:34
    
I can understand the temptation towards a simpler solution. From experience I must unfortunately recommend to not fall into that trap. Either re-structure the API so you don't have to parse anything at all (second option) or build a parser. On the up-side, a "full-blown" parser for this case really is not that hard. It takes just a little bit of time. –  Roland Bouman Aug 1 '12 at 15:36
    
You make a good point. I'd rather not change the API, since I want API compatibility with another library. If nothing else, it's a great learning exercise. –  timw4mail Aug 1 '12 at 15:38
    
Ok. just give yourself a little time to read up on precedence parsing. I trust you'll find it will fit your purpose quite nicely, and it's not that hard. The tokenizer for instance is easily created using with some regex magic (which would not be fast, but rather quick to implement), and the precedence lookups really aren't that hard either - it's just a little bit of work, no more, no less. –  Roland Bouman Aug 1 '12 at 15:40

So here's roughly what I came up with:

class Query_Parser {

/**
 * Regex patterns for various syntax components
 *
 * @var array
 */
private $match_patterns = array(
    'function' => '([a-zA-Z0-9_]+\((.*?)\))',
    'identifier' => '([a-zA-Z0-9_-]+\.?)+',
    'operator' => '=|AND|&&?|~|\|\|?|\^|/|>=?|<=?|-|%|OR|\+|NOT|\!=?|<>|XOR'
);

/**
 * Regex matches
 *
 * @var array
 */
public $matches = array(
    'functions' => array(),
    'identifiers' => array(),
    'operators' => array(),
    'combined' => array(),
);

/**
 * Constructor/entry point into parser
 *
 * @param string
 */
public function __construct($sql = '')
{
    // Get sql clause components
    preg_match_all('`'.$this->match_patterns['function'].'`', $sql, $this->matches['functions'], PREG_SET_ORDER);
    preg_match_all('`'.$this->match_patterns['identifier'].'`', $sql, $this->matches['identifiers'], PREG_SET_ORDER);
    preg_match_all('`'.$this->match_patterns['operator'].'`', $sql, $this->matches['operators'], PREG_SET_ORDER);

    // Get everything at once for ordering
    $full_pattern = '`'.$this->match_patterns['function'].'+|'.$this->match_patterns['identifier'].'|('.$this->match_patterns['operator'].')+`i';
    preg_match_all($full_pattern, $sql, $this->matches['combined'], PREG_SET_ORDER);

    // Go through the matches, and get the most relevant matches
    $this->matches = array_map(array($this, 'filter_array'), $this->matches);
}

// --------------------------------------------------------------------------

/**
 * Public parser method for seting the parse string
 *
 * @param string
 */
public function parse_join($sql)
{
    $this->__construct($sql);
    return $this->matches;
}

// --------------------------------------------------------------------------

/**
 * Returns a more useful match array
 *
 * @param array
 * @return array
 */
private function filter_array($array)
{
    $new_array = array();

    foreach($array as $row)
    {
        if (is_array($row))
        {
            $new_array[] = $row[0];
        }
        else
        {
            $new_array[] = $row;
        }
    }

    return $new_array;
}

}

I then run this in my Query Builder class, quote the identifiers in the clause, and then string it back together:

// Parse out the join condition
$parts = $parser->parse_join($condition);
$count = count($parts['identifiers']);

// Go through and quote the identifiers
for($i=0; $i <= $count; $i++)
{
    if (in_array($parts['combined'][$i], $parts['identifiers']) && ! is_numeric($parts['combined'][$i]))
    {
        $parts['combined'][$i] = $this->quote_ident($parts['combined'][$i]);
    }
}

$parsed_condition = implode(' ', $parts['combined']);
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