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How can an inner function call a parent function after it has expired?

setTimeout(main, 2000);
function main(){
    /* .... code */
    setTimeout(console.log("hello after 5 seconds"), 5000);
}

The intended action is to print hello after 5 seconds in 5 seconds (7 total); with the above code it prints it in 2 seconds.

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1  
I assure you, it will happen :) –  jAndy Aug 1 '12 at 15:33
    
Is it you final code? You have sobre problems... –  davidbuzatto Aug 1 '12 at 15:33
    
Your function1() code does not do anything, so how do you know it doesn't get called? –  Pointy Aug 1 '12 at 15:33
    
function1(){ return string; } is not valid! –  epascarello Aug 1 '12 at 15:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to pass setTimeout function references. With setTimeout(console.log("hello after 5 seconds"), 5000);, you call console.log immediately. Any time you write () after a function name, you're invoking it.

console.log returns undefined, which is what is passed to setTimeout. It just ignores the undefined value and does nothing. (And it doesn't throw any errors.)

If you need to pass parameters to your callback function, there are a few different ways to go.

Anonymous function:

setTimeout(function() {
    console.log('...');
}, 5000);

Return a function:

function logger(msg) {
    return function() {
        console.log(msg);
    }
}

// now, whenever you need to do a setTimeout...
setTimeout(logger('...'), 5000);

This works because invoking logger simply returns a new anonymous function that closes over msg. The returned function is what is actually passed to setTimeout, and when the callback is fired, it has access to msg via the closure.

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1  
That's what's in the OP now. –  Pointy Aug 1 '12 at 15:33
    
Answer completely reworked to address updated, clarified question. –  josh3736 Aug 1 '12 at 15:53

I think I understood what you want. Take a look:

var main = function(){
    console.log("foo");
    var function1 = function( string ) {
        console.log("function1: " + string);
    };
    var function2 = function() {
        console.log( "hadouken!" );
    };
    // you will need to use a closure to call the function
    // that you want with parameters
    // if you dont have parameters, just pass the function itself
    setTimeout(function(){ function1("bar") }, 5000);
    setTimeout(function2, 6000);
}
setTimeout(main, 2000);

Or:

function main(){
    console.log("foo");
    function function1( string ) {
        console.log("function1: " + string);
    };
    function function2() {
        console.log( "hadouken!" );
    };
    // you will need to use a closure to call the function
    // that you want with parameters
    // if you dont have parameters, just pass the function itself
    setTimeout(function(){ function1("bar") }, 5000);
    setTimeout(function2, 6000);
}
setTimeout(main, 2000);

I usually prefer the first sintax.

jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/davidbuzatto/65VsV/

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yes I think this is it, let me try this –  jacktrades Aug 1 '12 at 15:40

It works! You miss word function.

setTimeout(main, 1000);

function main() {
    function function1 () { alert(1); };
    setTimeout(function1, 1000);
}​
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