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I have been putting together a bash script and within it I need to update a file with some neccasary information. The command I am using is below:

sudo sed '
/end/ a\
First line to update\
  param 1 'var1'\
  param 2 'var2'\
  param 3 'var3'\
  param 4 'var4'\
end\
' TestFile >TestFileNew

Now this should update the file with the data and should look like this:

end
First line to update
  param 1 'var1'
  param 2 'var2'
  param 3 'var3'
  param 4 'var4'
end

The file does get created and the data is in it however it seems to strip the ' symbols from the text and I don't want this to happen, can anyone please help?? An example of what is actually getting produced is below:

end
First line to update
  param 1 var1
  param 2 var2
  param 3 var3
  param 4 var4
end
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3  
The single quote before var1 merely closes the opening single quote that starts your sed script. See below for the correct answer. –  ghoti Aug 1 '12 at 15:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use "" as the outer quotes:

sudo sed "
/end/ a\\
First line to update\\
  param 1 'var1'\\
  param 2 'var2'\\
  param 3 'var3'\\
  param 4 'var4'\\
end\\
" TestFile >TestFileNew
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1  
This fixes his sed issue.. Next up, a post regarding the use of sudo and redirection. –  jordanm Aug 1 '12 at 15:45
2  
Using "'s is this case is acceptable, however I would argue that it is safer to use ''s and replace the inner single quotes by '\'''s, thus avoiding unexpected interpolation. –  potong Aug 1 '12 at 15:58
    
@jordanm Indeed... Examples like this tend to make me a bit twitchy... ;-P –  twalberg Aug 1 '12 at 16:10
    
When I try your code I get this...... –  user723858 Aug 1 '12 at 18:49
    
end First line to updateparam 1 'var1' param 2 'var2' param 3 'var3' param 4 'var4'end –  user723858 Aug 1 '12 at 18:50

Looks like Igor has already provided an answer that may work for the single quotes.

Regarding the file creation, remember that sudo affects the program (sed) you're running as its option. It does not affect redirection, which is handled by your shell. So if you don't have permission as a user to write TestFileNew, sudo won't help you, the way you're using it above.

You might be better off creating your output somewhere else, then using sudo to move it into place.

sudo sed "/end/ ..." TestFile > /tmp/TestFileNew
sudo mv /tmp/TestFileNew ./TestFileNew

Alternately, this whole script could be run with sudo... I.e. /path/to/myscript is:

#!/bin/bash

sed "/end/ ..." TestFile > TestFileNew

then:

$ sudo /path/to/myscript

Then sudo is running bash instead of sed, and the privileged bash instance is responsible for handling redirection within the script.

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You can then spare sudo inside your script. And most seds provide the -i flag. –  knittl Aug 1 '12 at 15:56
1  
@knittl - Not sure what the real purpose here is, or if privileged access is also required to read TestFile. if the OP had mentioned he was going to mv TestFileNew TestFile, I would have suggested the -i flag. –  ghoti Aug 1 '12 at 15:58

In this case, it would probably be simpler to use sed's r command:

$ cat > /tmp/repl << EOF
First line to update
  param 1 'var1'
  param 2 'var2'
  param 3 'var3'
  param 4 'var4'
end
EOF
$ sed '/end/r/tmp/repl' TestFile
$ rm /tmp/repl

(I've ignored the sudo/redirect issue, but you probably want to so sudo sh -c 'sed /end/r/tmp/repl/ TestFile > TestFileNew'

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Sometimes you have to deal with two types of quotes (html and javascript, for example). Then it is very convenient to put sed commands in a script:

cat >FILE
end

cat >script.sed
/end/ a\
First line to update\
 param 1 'var1'\
 param 2 'var2'\
 param 3 'var3'\
 param 4 'var4'\
end            

sed -f script.sed FILE 
end
First line to update
  param 1 'var1'
  param 2 'var2'
  param 3 'var3'
  param 4 'var4'
end
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