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I have a project I'm working on that's actually a school project that I did successfully a long time ago. I haven't done C++ in a while, and I'm having a bit of a problem jumping back into it, especially with pointers. My question is, if I need a get and set function like this

    class Student
    {
    private:
            char firstName[64];
            char lastName[64];
    public:
            void setName(char *fName, char *lName);
            void getName(char *fName, char *lName);
    }


    void Student::setName(char *fName, char *lName);
    {
            firstName = *fName;
            lastName = *lName;
    }

when try to make my getName function, I seem to be very confused as to how I'm supposed to return the names with the function returning void. I know that it doesn't really have to return it, if it sets a value to something that can be returned, but I guess i'm rusty enough with pointers that I can't seem to make this work. I've tried things that I think can't work, such as returning values, but i'm not sure what would go in this get function.

    void Student::getName(char *fName, char *lName);
    {

    }

    int main()
    {
            char myFirstName[64] = "John"
            char myLastName[64] = "Doe"


    //testing to see if it's reading the char arrays correctly.
    cout << "Your Name is:" << myFirstName << " "  << myLastName << endl;


    Student aStudent;
    aStudent.setName(myFirstName, myLastName);

    //This part is where i'm confused.  and i'm sure some above is confusing as well.
    getStudent = aStudent.getName();

    }

I thought maybe I could return the private variable via the constructor, but why would I need a get function then? I'm just redoing this old assignment to get back into c++, I've been doing more network admin stuff, and ignored this for long enough to lose my mind apparently. Thanks in advance, and let me know if you need more information, I tried to be thorough.

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Why wouldn't you just return a char *? You have to return the type that name actually is. You are using the get() method to not let anyone access your private variables directly. –  Hunter McMillen Aug 1 '12 at 15:43
1  
Off topic, but if it is c++, why dont you just use strings instead of char[] ? It would make life a little easier... –  W. Goeman Aug 1 '12 at 15:44
2  
You need a book. Your class is all wrong, unless firstName and lastName are intended to be initials. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 1 '12 at 15:44
2  
@Slimmons I'm going to argue that there is no reason to learn an inferior, C-style way of handling strings in C++ and that you shouldn't continue this exercise. C-strings are so problematic and C++ fixed nearly all the issues with std::string. The most likely reason you were asked to do it this way was a teacher that comes from a strong C background and hasn't moved into the C++ way of doing things. –  Mark B Aug 1 '12 at 16:41
3  
There are plenty examples on the internet of how to use pointers and C-style strings. This example is among bad ones. It smells! Forget it! If you want to learn how to use strings in C++, have a look at any of answers below which use std::string. –  Bojan Komazec Aug 1 '12 at 16:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would suggest you to use std::string instead of char arrays.

So, your getName function should look like:

 std::string Student::getName()     {
    return firstName + lastName;
 }

Using pointers and returning void can be done too, but is more difficult. Before calling the getName function, you have to allocate an array to keep the string. you code should look like:

char firstName[100]
char lastName[100];
aStudent.getName(firstName, lastName);

And your getName should look like:

void Student::getName(char *fName, char *lName){
   strcpy(fName, firstName);
   strcpy(lName, lastName); 
}

First option is your way to go.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for addressing the problem in the way I asked. I agree string is better, but thanks for showing how you would do it with the char arrays, and get/set name. I still don't have it working, but I'm going to redo the entire thing, and post the question again with better code, and more of an explanation of problems. Thanks again. –  Slimmons Aug 1 '12 at 16:48

I've taken the liberty to convert your C-with-classes code to C++ code:

class Student
{
private:
        std::string firstName;
        std::string  lastName;
public:
        void setName(const std::string& fName, const std::string& lName);
        void getName(std::string& fName, std::string& lName);
}

The getName function takes parameters by reference, so any changes to them will reflect outside the function:

void Student::setName(const std::string& fName, const std::string& lName);
{
        firstName = fName;
        lastName = lName;
}
void Student::getName(std::string& fName, std::string& lName);
{
        fName = firstName ;
        lName = lastName ;
}

int main()
{
    std::string myFirstName = "John"
    std::string myLastName = "Doe"


    //testing to see if it's reading the char arrays correctly.
    cout << "Your Name is:" << myFirstName << " "  << myLastName << endl;


    Student aStudent;
    aStudent.setName(myFirstName, myLastName);

Here, the originally empty returnedFirstName and returnedLastName are modified inside the function:

    //This part is where i'm confused.  and i'm sure some above is confusing as well.
    std::string returnedFirstName;
    std::string returnedLastName;
    aStudent.getName(returnedFirstName,returnedLastName);
}
share|improve this answer
    
[undeclared variable] = [call to function with void return type]? (last line in main) –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 1 '12 at 15:59
    
Here are the requirements listed, and once again, I'm not looking for the best way to do this, I know there are several much much easier ways, but the assignment had this listed as the functions void getName(char *fName, char *lName) void setName(char *fName, char *lName) I Have no idea why he wanted it done this way, but since I was going through the old assignments I figured I'd do it how he wanted. Yes, doing it as a string is a better way, but he liked char arrays for some reason.....old people. –  Slimmons Aug 1 '12 at 16:19
    
@BenjaminLindley yeah don't know how that got in there :) –  Luchian Grigore Aug 1 '12 at 17:00

You have modeled it with out parameters. So You need to do.

char f[64];
char l[64];
aStudent.getName(f, l);

also I am confused. Is it even working at all ? You are just storing char in your Student object. which is neither a char array, not a char*

In C++ there is a std::string and we often avoid C style strings unless it is explicitly required to work with any other library.

There can be several ways to model your Student class.

class Student{
  private:
     std::string firstName;
     std::string lastName;
  public:
     void setName(const std::string& fName, const std::string& lName);
     std::string getName() const;
     void getName(std::string& fname, std::string& lname) const;
}

std::string Student::getName() const{
    return firstName+" "+lastName;
}
void Student::getName(std::string& fname, std::string& lname) const{
    fname = firstName;
    lname = lastName;
}

If you want both first and last name you can model it after std::pair or with boost::tuple

class Student{
  public:
    typedef std::pair<std::string, std::string> NamePairT
  private:
     NamePairT _namePair;
  public:
     void setName(const NamePairT& namePair);
     NamePairT getName() const;
}


void Student::setName(const NamePairT& namePair) const{
    _namePair = namePair;
}
NamePairT Student::getName() const{
    return _namePair;
}

Student s;
s.setName(std::make_pair("Some", "One"));
Student::NamePairT name = s.getName();
std::cout << s.first << " " << s.second;
share|improve this answer

First, the "working" code:

#include <string.h>

class Student
{
private:
        char firstName[64];
        char lastName[64];
public:
        void setName(const char *fName, const char *lName)
        {
            strcpy(firstName, fName);
            strcpy(lastName, lName);
        }

        void getName(char *fName, char *lName) const
        {
            strcpy(fName, firstName);
            strcpy(lName, lastName);
        }
};

Now, why you should use std::string instead:

This code is open to buffer overflows. What if the name doesn't fit in the array allocated? For setName, this can be overcome using strncpy since the size of the available buffer is known. For getName, however, the signature your professor gave you has no information about the size of the destination buffer, so it's totally impossible to protect against writing past the end. std::string, on the other hand, both knows its buffer size and can be reallocated to store as much data as needed, so the buffer overflow can't happen.

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your method returns void so getStudent = aStudent.getName(); has no meaning. If you are trying to set *fName and *lName to the values of aStudent, you could do something like this

void Student::getName( char *fName, char *lName ){
  fName = firstName;
  lName = lastName;
  }

and set the values in main something like:

char *fName, *lName;
aStudent( fName, lName);
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