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I was wondering if I could emulate something similar to how ASPX works with their form system. When I click a button, it calls the same page but rather than reload the entire page, it calls a certain function inside the page. For instance it can call a function inside which will verify that the form elements are filled out. Is this possible in PHP? I am not sure how to provide an example of this and I am very sorry for being vague...

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I don't know what ASP feature this is, but whatever it is, it probably uses AJAX under the hood. –  Hassan Aug 1 '12 at 16:05

6 Answers 6

Ajax is your method here. PHP is server side, so by definition you have to go to the server to get what you need.

If you're really Ajax-phobic, XAJAX will allow you to call PHP functions directly without a ton of Ajax-like javascript code. It's not the most documented of systems, though.

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Does it need to be a PHP call? You can accomplish that with simple Javascript or through an AJAX call.

EDIT: Added example of a PHP function call through AJAX. (uses jQuery)

Here's an example:

<?php
if(isset($_POST['functionToCall'])) 
{
    $args = $_POST;
    array_shift($args);
    call_user_func($_POST['functionToCall'], $args);
} else {
?>  
<html>
    <head>
        <script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
        <form id="myForm">
            <input id="mytext" type="text" value="some value"/>
            <input type="submit"/>
        </form>
        <button id="callBTN">Call Validation</button>
        <div id="result"></div>
        <script>
        $(document).ready(function()
        {
            $('#callBTN').click(function()
            {
                //Values to pass (validate)
                var inputVal = $('#mytext').val();

                // Function to call in the PHP Side
                var functionName = 'myFunctionCall';

                //Form validation with pure JS+jquery (without calling PHP)
                /*
                if( !inputVal)
                {
                    alert('text is empty');
                } else {
                    alert('text is not empty');
                }
                */

                //Form Validation by calling a PHP function through AJAX
                var selfURL = document.URL; //An example of calling itself
                $.post(selfURL, {"functionToCall": functionName, "mytext": inputVal}, function(data) {
                    $('#result').html(data);
                });
            });
        });
        </script>
    </body>
</html>
<?php
}
function myFunctionCall($args)
{
    if(!empty($_POST['mytext']))
    {
        print 'The text submited was -> ' . $_POST['mytext'];
    } else {
        print 'There was no text submitted';
    }   
}
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It may look like this, supposing you'll use jQuery

<script>
   $('#form).submit(function(e){
      e.preventDefault();
      $.post($(this).attr('action'), $(this).serialize(), function(data){
          // in data you'll have response from server, preferably JSON
      }
   });
</script>
<form action="form/handler.php" method="post" id="form">
    <input type="text" name="name" value="" />
    <input type="submit" />
</form>

form/handler.php

if(isset($_POST['name)){
    // implement any logic you want and construct JSON response you need
    $response = array('name' => $_POST['name']);
    echo json_encode($response);
}
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There are no callbacks in PHP. You will have to use front-end technologies organise and handle your events. To comunicate with your back end you use AJAX. (post/get to different php pages)

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This is only conceptually possible with PHP (i.e. you can emulate stateful behavior), by leveraging the "Model, View, Controller" design pattern and AJAX on the client.

PHP operates in a "stateless" way, meaning that every time there is a web request, PHP does its thing and completely "goes away" when it sends the response. If you properly architect an MVC app, you can highly focus web requests to just a given method in your app, and then use AJAX to call that method with form contents before actually allowing the form to "submit".

I say "conceptually", but note that this is common and recommended practice in large modern web apps. The reason I say it this way is that you are still using a "full" web request as far as PHP is concerned (the button doesn't "call" a PHP function any more than a regular web page refresh does). However, with architecture such as MVC, you can translate every page load into a method call.

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Ajax doesn't HAVE to be MVC.....it's a good idea, but it's not required. –  bpeterson76 Aug 1 '12 at 16:07
    
I know it's not required for AJAX, it was recommended for his request to "call a certain function". That is the requirement for which I recommend MVC (or similar). –  ctrahey Aug 1 '12 at 16:11
    
A little trigger happy on the donwvotes, @bpeterson76 ? Are these answers actually "not useful"? –  ctrahey Aug 1 '12 at 16:12

You could just pass in parameters via get that control what blocks of code are called.

i.e. a link back to self:

siteurl/page.php?what_to_do=2

Then some controlling code at the top:

if($_GET['what_to_do']==1)
{
    showMain();
}
elseif($_GET['what_to_do']==2)
{
    showSpecial();
}

Something like that without writing out an entire program for an answer.

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The above is the only way to do something akin to the question just with PHP. Obviously AJAX is the proper answer, but the OP has requested PHP. Care to explain downvotes? –  Larry B Aug 1 '12 at 16:09
    
I didn't downvote you answer but the problem is that your method only works with a page reload –  Tivie Oct 21 '13 at 21:13

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