Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using python's pySerial library to communicate to a machine (lunar photometer if you must know). The machine has built in scenarios that I can call by sending specific hex values corresponding to those scenarios via a com/serial port. For example, the following code works fine for the "Park secnario" in the machine.

s.write('\x11') #s is my serial object, '\x11' is the command for the park senario
s.write('\x12') #'\x12' is the command for the TrackSun scenario

The above code works as intended and the machine responds to these commands. However, there is a bult in Goto scenario which is activated by the command '\x02'. My problem is that the goto command takes horizontal and vertical angles as parameters as well in this format GoTo where xxxx and yyyy are the two angles. How do i pass in those parameters in my s.write() command. I have tried: s.write('\x02 xxxx yyyy') which does not seem to work. Am i doing something wrong with passing the parameters? The command works fine when i use hyperterminal (in hex mode) with the following code:

8/1/2012 11:37:36.048 [TX] - 02 30 34 3B 30 3F 3A 3D 3B 03 
8/1/2012 11:37:51.166 [RX] - 01 

EDIT: Here is an example of the 'Park Scenario' command sent using hyperterminal, just in case.

8/1/2012 12:14:56.649 [TX] - 11 
8/1/2012 12:15:07.962 [RX] - 01 
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The following call to s.write() would be the same as what you're sending on Hyperterminal:

s.write('\x02\x30\x34\x3b\x30\x3f\x3a\x3d\x3b\x03')

The general solution will depend on how your angles are encoded. I can't determine the encoding from your example.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you! Your solution worked. The manufacturer of the instrument for some reason decided to make the format of the angles really strange. In case you are curious, the first angle '\x30\x34\x3b\x30\' is the equivalent of 1200 degrees (in decimal). 1200 is 04b0 in hex. For each character in '04b0', they added a 3 infront of it. I dont know why. –  Aasam Tasaddaq Aug 1 '12 at 18:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.