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suppose

list1 = [['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)], ['b', (2,1)], ['b', (2,2)], ['b',(2, 4)]]

list2 = [[(1, 1), (1, 3), (2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 4)]]

Now how could I report an error for list1 that ['b', (1, 2)] is missing or ['b', (2, 3)] is missing

Similarly for list2 there should be report error that (1, 2) or (2, 3) is missing

My intention is to report the error if for example something is missing in sequence like (1,1) then comes (1,2) followed by (1,3) if (1,2) is missing then error

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1  
what is the criteria for missing elements? –  jterrace Aug 1 '12 at 16:21
    
(1,1),(1,2),(1,3)... should come in sequence...if any one is missing then the error should be reported similarly for (2,1),(2,2),(2,3).. –  smazon09 Aug 1 '12 at 16:23
    
So you just want to make sure that every subsequence with a given val[0] has a val for every val[1] between min val[1] and max val[1]? What if val[0] is not contiguous? Also, why are you not using a dict for list1? –  Silas Ray Aug 1 '12 at 16:23
    
Also, what are you supposed to do if you find a duplicate (ex list2 contains 2 elements (1, 2)). –  Silas Ray Aug 1 '12 at 16:31
1  
Is this homework? If it is, then please tag it as such. Thanks! –  Sam Mussmann Aug 1 '12 at 16:31

2 Answers 2

from collections import defaultdict
set1 = set(list1)
set2 = set(list2)
missing = []
dict1 = defaultdict(lambda: defaultdict(list))
dict2 = defaultdict(list)
for key, sublist in set1:
    dict1[key][sublist[0]].append(sublist[1])
for key, value in set2:
    dict2[key].append(value)
for key, subdict in sorted(dict1.iteritems()):
    for subkey, values in sorted(subdict.iteritems()):
        subkey_misses = []
        last_value = None
        for value in values:
            if last_value is not None and last_value + 1 != value:
                subkey_misses.extend(range(last_value + 1, value))
            last_value = value
        if subkey_misses:
            misses.append('%s.%d missing %s' % (key, subkey, subkey_misses))
for key, values in sorted(dict2.iteritems()):
    key_misses = []
    last_value = None
    for value in values:
        if last_value is not None and last_value + 1 != value:
            key_misses.append(range(last_value + 1), value))
        last_value = value
    if key_misses:
        misses.append('%d missing %s' % (key, key_misses))
print misses
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You should use a dict instead of a list. But here's a solution using your structures. s1 is a similar idea as the previous answer but note the unnecessarily long list comprehension to get the pattern you have in list1. And you require a specific for loop to check rather than the set "-" operator.

>>> s1 = [[x, (c, d)] for x in ['a', 'b']
...                   for c in range(1, 3)
...                   for d in range(1, 5)
...                   if x=='a' and c==1 or x=='b' and c==2]
>>> s1
[['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 2)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)],
 ['b', (2, 1)], ['b', (2, 2)], ['b', (2, 3)], ['b', (2, 4)]]
>>>
>>> list1 = [['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)],
...          ['b', (2, 1)], ['b', (2, 2)], ['b', (2, 4)]]
>>> for thing in s1:
...     if thing not in list1:
...         print 'missing: ', thing
...         # or raise an error if you want
...         
missing:  ['a', (1, 2)]
missing:  ['b', (2, 3)]

Repeat the same for list2. Creating s2 should be easier using the example for s1 above.

Btw, the dict would look like this for list1:

dict1 = {'a': [(1, 1), (1, 3), (1, 4)], 'b': [(2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 4)]}

Then creating s1 is simplified a bit and but the comparison loop might get two lines longer.


To answer your question to generalize, then either 1. knowing letters first or 2. knowing numbers/number of letters?

Knowing letters:

>>> set_of_letters = ('a', 'b', 'c')
>>> s1 = [[x, (ord(x)-96, d)]
...       for x in set_of_letters
...       for d in range(1, 5)]
>>> s1
[['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 2)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)],
 ['b', (2, 1)], ['b', (2, 2)], ['b', (2, 3)], ['b', (2, 4)],
 ['c', (3, 1)], ['c', (3, 2)], ['c', (3, 3)], ['c', (3, 4)]]

Knowing numbers:

>>> number_of_letters = 3
>>> s1 = [[chr(c+96), (c, d)]
...       for c in range(1, number_of_letters + 1)
...       for d in range(1, 5)]
>>> s1
[['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 2)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)],
 ['b', (2, 1)], ['b', (2, 2)], ['b', (2, 3)], ['b', (2, 4)],
 ['c', (3, 1)], ['c', (3, 2)], ['c', (3, 3)], ['c', (3, 4)]]
share|improve this answer
    
what if I had c, d, e...that means my list would be [['a', (1, 1)], ['a', (1, 3)], ['a', (1, 4)], ['b', (2,1)], ['b', (2,2)], ['b',(2, 4)],['c',(3,1)], ('c', (3,4)),['d', (4,1)], ['d', (4,2)] ,['d', (4,4)]]. I am looking for a more general solution to this problem –  smazon09 Aug 1 '12 at 17:29
    
hint: ord('a')-96 == 1. So you're saying, in [[x, (c, d)] the c is always 1 for 'a', 2 for 'b', etc.? –  aneroid Aug 1 '12 at 17:39
    
I've added the "generalization" for creating s1. The checking loop with for remains the same. –  aneroid Aug 1 '12 at 17:58
    
I meant to say the sequence doesn't restrict itself to just a b or c...it could be d, e, f etc..each of 'a' , 'b' or 'c' or whatever could have the sequence so that means we could have this appended to the list ['c', (3,1)], ['c', (3,3)] and after that ['d', (4, 1)], ['d',(4,2)], ['d', (4,4)] and so on...finally we have to report an error if ['d',(4,3)] or 'c',(3,2) is missing.. –  smazon09 Aug 1 '12 at 17:59
    
Then convert your list1 to a dict as I mentioned originally in my post. Then it's easier to compare each letter 'key' having a 'set' to a fixed set. So instead of appending your list, create your own function to take out the letters and add it to dict1, so that it looks like dict1 = {'a': [(1, 1), (1, 3), (1, 4)], 'b': [(2, 1), (2, 2), (2, 4)]} –  aneroid Aug 1 '12 at 18:04

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