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I am currently using this type of SQL on MySQL to insert multiple rows of values in one single query:

INSERT INTO `tbl` (`key1`,`key2`) VALUES ('r1v1','r1v2'),('r2v1','r2v2'),...

On the readings on PDO PDO, the use prepared statements should give me a better security than static queries.

I would therefore like to know whether it is possible to generate "inserting multiple rows of values by the use of one query" using Prepared Statements.

If yes, may I know how can I implement it?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 60 down vote accepted

Multiple Values Insert with PDO Prepared Statements

Inserting multiple values in one execute statement. Why because according to this page it is faster than regular inserts. http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/insert-speed.html

$datafields = array('fielda', 'fieldb', ... );

$data[] = array('fielda' => 'value', 'fieldb' => 'value' ....);
$data[] = array('fielda' => 'value', 'fieldb' => 'value' ....);

more data values or you probably have a loop that populates data.

With prepared inserts you need to know the fields you're inserting to, and the number of fields to create the ? placeholders to bind your parameters.

insert into table (fielda, fieldb, ... ) values (?,?...), (?,?...)....

That is basically how we want the insert statement to look like.

Now, the code:

function placeholders($text, $count=0, $separator=","){
    $result = array();
    if($count > 0){
        for($x=0; $x<$count; $x++){
            $result[] = $text;
        }
    }

    return implode($separator, $result);
}
$pdo->beginTransaction(); // also helps speed up your inserts.
$insert_values = array();
foreach($data as $d){
    $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
    $insert_values = array_merge($insert_values, array_values($d));
}

$sql = "INSERT INTO table (" . implode(",", $datafields ) . ") VALUES " . implode(',', $question_marks);

$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);
try {
    $stmt->execute($insert_values);
} catch (PDOException $e){
    echo $e->getMessage();
}
$pdo->commit();

Although in my test, there was only a 1 sec difference when using multiple inserts and regular prepared inserts with single value.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree and have supported your suggestion with some test data below for reference. –  JM4 Jan 31 '12 at 23:29
4  
A typo, in the explanation above it mentions $datafields although $datafield is used in $sql. Thus copy paste would result in error. Please do rectify. Thanks for this solution though. –  pal4life Feb 14 '12 at 0:48
    
Used this for a while then noticed that values with single quotes in them aren't escaped properly. Using double quotes on implosion works like a charm for me: $a[] = '("' . implode(",", $question_marks) . '", NOW())'; –  qwertzman Sep 24 '12 at 11:53
    
array_merge seems more expensive than just using a array_push. –  K2xL Oct 17 '13 at 18:22
    
If any one likes : there is also a library github.com/auraphp/Aura.SqlQuery/tree/… –  Hari K T 7 hours ago

Same answer as Mr. Balagtas, slightly clearer...

Recent versions MySQL and PHP PDO do support multi-row INSERT statements.

SQL Overview

The SQL will look something like this, assuming a 3-column table you'd like to INSERT to.

INSERT INTO tbl_name
            (colA, colB, colC)
     VALUES (?, ?, ?), (?, ?, ?), (?, ?, ?) [,...]

ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE works as expected even with a multi-row INSERT; append this:

ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE colA = VALUES(colA), colB = VALUES(colB), colC = VALUES(colC)

PHP Overview

Your PHP code will follow the usual $pdo->prepare($qry) and $stmt->execute($params) PDO calls.

$params will be a 1-dimensional array of all the values to pass to the INSERT.

In the above example, it should contain 9 elements; PDO will use every set of 3 as a single row of values. (Inserting 3 rows of 3 columns each = 9 element array.)

Implementation

Below code is written for clarity, not efficiency. Work with the PHP array_*() functions for better ways to map or walk through your data if you'd like. Whether you can use transactions obviously depends on your MySQL table type.

Assuming:

  • $tblName - the string name of the table to INSERT to
  • $colNames - 1-dimensional array of the column names of the table These column names must be valid MySQL column identifiers; escape them with backticks (``) if they are not
  • $dataVals - mutli-dimensional array, where each element is a 1-d array of a row of values to INSERT

Sample Code

// setup data values for PDO
// memory warning: this is creating a copy all of $dataVals
$dataToInsert = array();

foreach ($dataVals as $row => $data) {
    foreach($data as $val) {
        $dataToInsert[] = $val;
    }
}

// (optional) setup the ON DUPLICATE column names
$updateCols = array();

foreach ($colNames as $curCol) {
    $updateCols[] = $curCol . " = VALUES($curCol)";
}

$onDup = implode(', ', $updateCols);

// setup the placeholders - a fancy way to make the long "(?, ?, ?)..." string
$rowPlaces = '(' . implode(', ', array_fill(0, count($colNames), '?')) . ')';
$allPlaces = implode(', ', array_fill(0, count($dataVals), $rowPlaces));

$qry = "INSERT INTO $tblName (" . implode(', ', $colNames) . 
    " VALUES " . $allPlaces . " ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE $onDup";

// and then the PHP PDO boilerplate
$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);

try {
   $stmt->execute($insert_values);
} catch (PDOException $e){
   echo $e->getMessage();
}

$pdo->commit();
share|improve this answer
2  
That is really too bad that PDO handles it this way, there are some very elegant ways to do this in other DB drivers. –  Jonathon Wisnoski May 6 '13 at 2:00
    
This setups the placeholders even more tersely, making $rowPlaces no longer necessary: $allPlaces = implode(',', array_fill(0, count($dataVals), '('.str_pad('', (count($colNames)*2)-1, '?,').')')); –  Phil Jun 19 '14 at 4:03

For what it is worth, I have seen a lot of users recommend iterating through INSERT statements instead of building out as a single string query as the selected answer did. I decided to run a simple test with just two fields and a very basic insert statement:

<?php
require('conn.php');

$fname = 'J';
$lname = 'M';

$time_start = microtime(true);
$stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO table (FirstName, LastName) VALUES (:fname, :lname)');

for($i = 1; $i <= 10; $i++ )  {
    $stmt->bindParam(':fname', $fname);
    $stmt->bindParam(':lname', $lname);
    $stmt->execute();

    $fname .= 'O';
    $lname .= 'A';
}


$time_end = microtime(true);
$time = $time_end - $time_start;

echo "Completed in ". $time ." seconds <hr>";

$fname2 = 'J';
$lname2 = 'M';

$time_start2 = microtime(true);
$qry = 'INSERT INTO table (FirstName, LastName) VALUES ';
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?), ";
$qry .= "(?,?)";

$stmt2 = $db->prepare($qry);
$values = array();

for($j = 1; $j<=10; $j++) {
    $values2 = array($fname2, $lname2);
    $values = array_merge($values,$values2);

    $fname2 .= 'O';
    $lname2 .= 'A';
}

$stmt2->execute($values);

$time_end2 = microtime(true);
$time2 = $time_end2 - $time_start2;

echo "Completed in ". $time2 ." seconds <hr>";
?>

While the overall query itself took milliseconds or less, the latter (single string) query was consistently 8 times faster or more. If this was built out to say reflect an import of thousands of rows on many more columns, the difference could be enormous.

share|improve this answer
    
point well proved –  mireille raad Aug 3 '13 at 23:03

The Accepted Answer by Herbert Balagtas works well when the $data array is small. With larger $data arrays the array_merge function becomes prohibitively slow. My test file to create the $data array has 28 cols and is about 80,000 lines. The final script took 41s to complete.

Using array_push() to create $insert_values instead of array_merge() resulted in a 100X speed up with execution time of 0.41s.

The problematic array_merge():

$insert_values = array();

foreach($data as $d){
 $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
 $insert_values = array_merge($insert_values, array_values($d));
}

To eliminate the need for array_merge(), you can build the following two arrays instead:

//Note that these fields are empty, but the field count should match the fields in $datafields.
$data[] = array('','','','',... n ); 

//getting rid of array_merge()
array_push($insert_values, $value1, $value2, $value3 ... n ); 

These arrays can then be used as follows:

function placeholders($text, $count=0, $separator=","){
    $result = array();
    if($count > 0){
        for($x=0; $x<$count; $x++){
            $result[] = $text;
        }
    }

    return implode($separator, $result);
}

$pdo->beginTransaction();

foreach($data as $d){
 $question_marks[] = '('  . placeholders('?', sizeof($d)) . ')';
}

$sql = "INSERT INTO table (" . implode(",", array_keys($datafield) ) . ") VALUES " . implode(',', $question_marks);

$stmt = $pdo->prepare ($sql);
try {
    $stmt->execute($insert_values);
} catch (PDOException $e){
    echo $e->getMessage();
}
$pdo->commit();
share|improve this answer
    
In PHP 5.6 you can do array_push($data, ...array_values($row)) instead of $data = array_merge($data, array_values($row));. Much faster. –  Mark Feb 5 at 18:08

That's simply not the way you use prepared statements.

It is perfectly okay to insert one row per query because you can execute one prepared statement multiple times with different parameters. In fact that is one of the greatest advantages as it allows you to insert you a great number of rows in an efficient, secure and comfortable manner.

So it maybe possible to implement the scheme you proposing, at least for a fixed number of rows, but it is almost guaranteed that this is not really what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you suggest a better way to insert multiple rows into a table? –  Crashthatch Jul 4 '14 at 15:51
    
@Crashthatch: Just do it the naive way: Setup the prepared statement once, then execute it for each row with different values for the bound parameters. That's the second approach in Zyk's answer. –  sebasgo Jul 7 '14 at 7:53

Two possible approaches:

$stmt = $pdo->prepare('INSERT INTO foo VALUES(:v1_1, :v1_2, :v1_3),
    (:v2_1, :v2_2, :v2_3),
    (:v2_1, :v2_2, :v2_3)');
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_1', $data[0][0]);
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_2', $data[0][1]);
$stmt->bindValue(':v1_3', $data[0][2]);
// etc...
$stmt->execute();

Or:

$stmt = $pdo->prepare('INSERT INTO foo VALUES(:a, :b, :c)');
foreach($data as $item)
{
    $stmt->bindValue(':a', $item[0]);
    $stmt->bindValue(':b', $item[1]);
    $stmt->bindValue(':c', $item[2]);
    $stmt->execute();
}

If the data for all the rows are in a single array, I would use the second solution.

share|improve this answer
7  
in the latter aren't you then making several (possibly thousands) of separate execute calls instead of combining into one statement? –  JM4 Jan 31 '12 at 20:24
    
@JM4, are you suggesting $stmt->execute(); should be outside the foreach loop? –  bafromca Aug 8 '13 at 16:13
    
@bafromca - Yes I am. See my answer above with upvotes. On a pure insert statement there is no reason i can logically come up with that it can't be a single statement. One call, one execute. In fact, my answer from early 2012 could be improved even further - something I will do later on when I have some more time. If you start throwing in Insert / update/ delete combinations, that is a different story. –  JM4 Aug 8 '13 at 20:13
$stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO ids VALUES (0, :url)');
try {
 $db->beginTransaction();
 foreach ($ursl as $url) {
   $stmt->bindValue(':url', $url);
   $stmt->execute();
 }
 $db->commit();
} catch (PDOException $e) {
 $db->rollBack();
}
share|improve this answer

A shorter answer: flatten the array of data ordered by columns then

//$array = array( '1','2','3','4','5', '1','2','3','4','5');
$arCount = count($array);
$rCount = ($arCount  ? $arCount - 1 : 0);
$criteria = sprintf("(?,?,?,?,?)%s", str_repeat(",(?,?,?,?,?)", $rCount));
$sql = "INSERT INTO table(c1,c2,c3,c4,c5) VALUES$criteria";

When inserting a 1,000 or so records you don't want to have to loop through every record to insert them when all you need is a count of the values.

share|improve this answer

Here's a class I wrote do multiple inserts with purge option:

<?php

/**
 * $pdo->beginTransaction();
 * $pmi = new PDOMultiLineInserter($pdo, "foo", array("a","b","c","e"), 10);
 * $pmi->insertRow($data);
 * ....
 * $pmi->insertRow($data);
 * $pmi->purgeRemainingInserts();
 * $pdo->commit();
 *
 */
class PDOMultiLineInserter {
    private $_purgeAtCount;
    private $_bigInsertQuery, $_singleInsertQuery;
    private $_currentlyInsertingRows  = array();
    private $_currentlyInsertingCount = 0;
    private $_numberOfFields;
    private $_error;
    private $_insertCount = 0;

    function __construct(\PDO $pdo, $tableName, $fieldsAsArray, $bigInsertCount = 100) {
        $this->_numberOfFields = count($fieldsAsArray);
        $insertIntoPortion = "INSERT INTO `$tableName` (`".implode("`,`", $fieldsAsArray)."`) VALUES";
        $questionMarks  = " (?".str_repeat(",?", $this->_numberOfFields - 1).")";

        $this->_purgeAtCount = $bigInsertCount;
        $this->_bigInsertQuery    = $pdo->prepare($insertIntoPortion.$questionMarks.str_repeat(", ".$questionMarks, $bigInsertCount - 1));
        $this->_singleInsertQuery = $pdo->prepare($insertIntoPortion.$questionMarks);
    }

    function insertRow($rowData) {
        // @todo Compare speed
        // $this->_currentlyInsertingRows = array_merge($this->_currentlyInsertingRows, $rowData);
        foreach($rowData as $v) array_push($this->_currentlyInsertingRows, $v);
        //
        if (++$this->_currentlyInsertingCount == $this->_purgeAtCount) {
            if ($this->_bigInsertQuery->execute($this->_currentlyInsertingRows) === FALSE) {
                $this->_error = "Failed to perform a multi-insert (after {$this->_insertCount} inserts), the following errors occurred:".implode('<br/>', $this->_bigInsertQuery->errorInfo());
                return false;
            }
            $this->_insertCount++;

            $this->_currentlyInsertingCount = 0;
            $this->_currentlyInsertingRows = array();
        }
        return true;
    }

    function purgeRemainingInserts() {
        while ($this->_currentlyInsertingCount > 0) {
            $singleInsertData = array();
            // @todo Compare speed - http://www.evardsson.com/blog/2010/02/05/comparing-php-array_shift-to-array_pop/
            // for ($i = 0; $i < $this->_numberOfFields; $i++) $singleInsertData[] = array_pop($this->_currentlyInsertingRows); array_reverse($singleInsertData);
            for ($i = 0; $i < $this->_numberOfFields; $i++) array_unshift($singleInsertData, array_pop($this->_currentlyInsertingRows));

            if ($this->_singleInsertQuery->execute($singleInsertData) === FALSE) {
                $this->_error = "Failed to perform a small-insert (whilst purging the remaining rows; the following errors occurred:".implode('<br/>', $this->_singleInsertQuery->errorInfo());
                return false;
            }
            $this->_currentlyInsertingCount--;
        }
    }

    public function getError() {
        return $this->_error;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can insert multiple rows in a single query with this function:

function insertMultiple($query,$rows) {
    if (count($rows)>0) {
        $args = array_fill(0, count($rows[0]), '?');

        $params = array();
        foreach($rows as $row)
        {
            $values[] = "(".implode(',', $args).")";
            foreach($row as $value)
            {
                $params[] = $value;
            }
        }

        $query = $query." VALUES ".implode(',', $values);
        $stmt = $PDO->prepare($query);
        $stmt->execute($params);
    }
}

$row is an array of arrays of values. In your case you would call the function with

insertMultiple("INSERT INTO tbl (`key1`,`key2`)",array(array('r1v1','r1v2'),array('r2v1','r2v2')));

This has the benefit that you use prepared statements, while inserting multiple rows with a single query. Security!

share|improve this answer

This worked for me

    $sql = 'INSERT INTO table(pk_pk1,pk_pk2,date,pk_3) VALUES '; 
    $qPart = array_fill(0, count($array), "(?, ?,UTC_TIMESTAMP(),?)");
 $sql .= implode(",", $qPart);
 $stmt =    DB::prepare('base', $sql);
     $i = 1;
     foreach ($array as $value) 
       { 
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $value);
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk1);
       $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk2); 
      $stmt->bindValue($i++, $pk_pk3); 
      } 
    $stmt->execute();
share|improve this answer

Here is my solution: https://github.com/sasha-ch/Aura.Sql based on auraphp/Aura.Sql library.

Usage example:

$q = "insert into t2(id,name) values (?,?), ... on duplicate key update name=name"; 
$bind_values = [ [[1,'str1'],[2,'str2']] ];
$pdo->perform($q, $bind_values);

Bugreports are welcome.

share|improve this answer
    
As of 2.4 you can create multi insert with github.com/auraphp/Aura.SqlQuery/tree/… and make use of ExtendedPdo to execute :) . –  Hari K T 7 hours ago

My real world example to insert all german postcodes into an empty table (to add town names later):

// obtain column template
$stmt = $db->prepare('SHOW COLUMNS FROM towns');
$stmt->execute();
$columns = array_fill_keys(array_values($stmt->fetchAll(PDO::FETCH_COLUMN)), null);
// multiple INSERT
$postcode = '01000';// smallest german postcode
while ($postcode <= 99999) {// highest german postcode
    $values = array();
    while ($postcode <= 99999) {
        // reset row
        $row = $columns;
        // now fill our row with data
        $row['postcode'] = sprintf('%05d', $postcode);
        // build INSERT array
        foreach ($row as $value) {
            $values[] = $value;
        }
        $postcode++;
        // avoid memory kill
        if (!($postcode % 10000)) {
            break;
        }
    }
    // build query
    $count_columns = count($columns);
    $placeholder = ',(' . substr(str_repeat(',?', $count_columns), 1) . ')';//,(?,?,?)
    $placeholder_group = substr(str_repeat($placeholder, count($values) / $count_columns), 1);//(?,?,?),(?,?,?)...
    $into_columns = implode(',', array_keys($columns));//col1,col2,col3
    // this part is optional:
    $on_duplicate = array();
    foreach ($columns as $column => $row) {
        $on_duplicate[] = $column;
        $on_duplicate[] = $column;
    }
    $on_duplicate = ' ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE' . vsprintf(substr(str_repeat(', %s = VALUES(%s)', $count_columns), 1), $on_duplicate);
    // execute query
    $stmt = $db->prepare('INSERT INTO towns (' . $into_columns . ') VALUES' . $placeholder_group . $on_duplicate);//INSERT INTO towns (col1,col2,col3) VALUES(?,?,?),(?,?,?)... {ON DUPLICATE...}
    $stmt->execute($values);
}

As you can see its fully flexible. You don't need to check the amount of columns or check on which position your column is. You only need to set the insert data:

    $row['postcode'] = sprintf('%05d', $postcode);

I'm proud of some of the query string constructors as they work without heavy array-functions like array_merge. Especially vsprintf() was a good find.

Finally I needed to add 2x while() to avoid exceeding the memory limit. This depends on your memory limit but at all its a good general solution to avoid problems (and having 10 queries is still much better than 10.000).

share|improve this answer

This is how I did it:

First define the column names you'll use, or leave it blank and pdo will assume you want to use all the columns on the table - in which case you'll need to inform the row values in the exact order they appear on the table.

$cols = 'name', 'middleName', 'eMail';
$table = 'people';

Now, suppose you have a two dimensional array already prepared. Iterate it, and construct a string with your row values, as such:

foreach ( $people as $person ) {
if(! $rowVals ) {
$rows = '(' . "'$name'" . ',' . "'$middleName'" . ',' .           "'$eMail'" . ')';
} else { $rowVals  = '(' . "'$name'" . ',' . "'$middleName'" . ',' . "'$eMail'" . ')';
}

Now, what you just did was check if $rows was already defined, and if not, create it and store row values and the necessary SQL syntax so it will be a valid statement. Note that strings should go inside double quotes and single quotes, so they will be promptly recognized as such.

All it's left to do is prepare the statement and execute, as such:

$stmt = $db->prepare ( "INSERT INTO $table $cols VALUES $rowVals" );
$stmt->execute ();

Tested with up to 2000 rows so far, and the execution time is dismal. Will run some more tests and will get back here in case I have something further to contribute.

Regards.

share|improve this answer

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