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This is my first question, and something which has got me stumped. I'm not sure if this is something simple and I'm overlooking it or something not possible.

Below is a very simplified version of my original code. The end goal is to have the output as follows:

1: 
2: this is a test
3: this is another test
4: this is another test

However, with the code in its current state, its actual output is this:

1: 
2: this is a test
3: this is another test
4: 

I want object 'B' to be able to access the value of test_variable AFTER first_function() has altered it.

It works fine when I declare test_variable as static, however in the actual application it wouldn't work and when I try to echo parent::test_variable it outputs 'Object ID #17' and so on.

class A
{
    public $test_variable;

    function __construct()
    {
        echo '1: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";
        $this->test_variable = 'this is a test';
        echo '2: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";
    }

    function first_function()
    {
        $this->test_variable = 'This is another test';
        echo '3: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";
        $b = new b;
        $b->second_function();
    }
}



class B extends A
{
    function __construct()
    {
        /* Dont call parent construct */
    }

    function second_function()
    {
        echo '4: ' . $this->test_variable;
    }
}

$a = new A;
$a->first_function();

// Outputs:
// 1:
// 2: this is a test
// 3: this is another test
// 4: 

// but I want it to output
// 1: 
// 2: this is a test
// 3: this is another test
// 4: this is another test

Many thanks for any responses. I greatly appreciate them.

Phil

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Declaring public $test_variable; inside the class means each instance (object) of the class has a copy. $test_variable in class A does not point to the same memory address as $test_variable in Class B. This is done intentionally to allow scope and remove a global state. As you said before, declaring it static will work, because then each instance shares the same variable.

In this instance, $test_variable is, in essence, a dependency that class B requires. You can get that dependency via constructor injection fairly easily:

class A
{
    public $test_variable;

    function __construct()
    {
       echo '1: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";
       $this->test_variable = 'this is a test';
       echo '2: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";
    }

    function first_function()
    {
       $this->test_variable = 'This is another test';
       echo '3: ' . $this->test_variable . "<br />";

       // Instantiate instance passing dependency
       $b = new b($this->test_variable);

       $b->second_function();
    }
}

class B extends A
{
    function __construct($dependency)
    {
       // Set dependency
       $this->test_variable = $dependency;
    }

    function second_function()
    {
       echo '4: ' . $this->test_variable;
    }
}

$a = new A;
$a->first_function();

So, that's just a thought on how you might consider handling this.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi Cillosis Thank you very much for your answer, it was very helpful. I've considered this approach before, and I think its probably the best I could hope for, but I really appreciate the explanation, it's always helpful to understand a problem as well as get an answer! – user1569083 Aug 1 '12 at 19:36

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