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I have this setter, but I don't know why set value and it doesn't change :

    this.setHead = function(head){
        console.log('Head: x:'+this.getHead().getX()+' y:'+this.getHead().getY());
        console.log('temp Head: x:'+head.getX()+' y:'+head.getY());
        this.head = head;
        console.log('Head: x:'+this.getHead().getX()+' y:'+this.getHead().getY());
    }

And the result in Chrome log is :

Head: x:5 y:10 // old value
temp Head: x:1 y:7 //temporary value decide to copy
Head: x:5 y:10     // and the new valụe : NO CHANGE

I have read that Javascript pass object by reference, I don't know does it difference with Java. If not, I don't know why happen that. Please tell me.

Thanks :)

@ Edited : I have add a line for log, and see strange result :

console.log('Head: x:'+this.head.getX()+' y:'+this.head.getY());
Head: x:1 y:7 

It's strange, because I think it should be same with below line but It don't

console.log('Head: x:'+this.getHead().getX()+' y:'+this.getHead().getY());

And my getHead() is :

this.getHead = function() {
            return head;
}
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1  
this inside setHead it's probably not what you think it is... –  elclanrs Aug 1 '12 at 16:34
    
Add console.log('Head: x:'+this.head.getX()+' y:'+this.head.getY()); at the bottom and post what you get. –  robbrit Aug 1 '12 at 16:34
    
Show us the getHead function, the head object you pass in and eventually the full "class" code. –  Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 16:34
1  
Your .getHead doesn't make any sense. Shouldn't it be return this.head?. this.head and head are separate things. –  Esailija Aug 1 '12 at 16:44
1  
@hqt you assign this.head, yet your getHead() returns head, whatever that refers to. It's not this.head for sure. Don't confuse variables and object properties, use variables for short-lived method local state (such as var i = 0 for iteration) and object properties for long-lived object state. –  Esailija Aug 1 '12 at 16:48
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Javascript doesn't pass anything by reference, setting this.head doesn't magically make head refer to something else (which is what by reference implies)

Your .getHead() method returns head, not this.head, so the assignment doesn't affect getHead() at all. They refer to different objects.

Try this:

this.getHead = function() {
    return this.head;
}

Basically what you have is most likely:

function Ctor( head ) {

    this.getHead = function() {
        return head;
    }

    this.setHead = function( head ) {
        this.head = head;
    }

}

the setHead sets object property, where as getHead returns the head variable passed to the constructor when initialized.

To avoid this confusion you should just stick to object properties and prototypes and it's all very simple:

function Ctor( head ) {
    this.head = head;
}

Ctor.prototype.getHead = function() {
    return this.head;
};

Ctor.prototype.setHead = function(head) {
    this.head = head;
};
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add comment
var o = function(){
  var self = this; // assign 'this' function to a variable
                   // so that it can be accessed in child functions
  var head = {};

  this.getHead = function(){
   ...
   return self.head;
  }
  this.setHead = function(head){
   ...
   self.head = head;
  }
}
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