Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use IdHTTP.get for get the HTMl of a url, but in this url is a table that load with ajax and I must wait a few seconds to it loaded and after it get the HTML of page.

have can I wait for this?

share|improve this question
    
Do you need to execute any ajax request? or a particular one? –  jachguate Aug 2 '12 at 1:07
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ajax uses client-side scripting to send background HTTP requests to the server and manipulate the HTML page that is already loaded in the browser. TIdHTTP will download the raw HTML data, but you would then have to execute the Ajax scripting yourself and send those extra requests yourself if you want it to do something. TIdHTTP (and Indy in general) cannot handle Ajax for you.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I know that but my means that how can I wait for example 10 Seconds after completed loading and then read the HTML with TidHTTP. –  Virgoir Aug 2 '12 at 10:33
    
You are missing the point. Once TIdHTTP has downloaded the initial HTML, that's it. A WebBrowser would then parse and display that HTML, executing the Ajax scripting, which would then use its own connections to send additional HTTP requests to the server and alter the WebBrowser's parsed contents accordingly, not the original HTML. The HTML that TIdHTTP downloads will not be the content that Ajax generates. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 2 '12 at 18:44
2  
If you want to simulate what Ajax does, you would have to download the original HTML and store it off to the side, then parse it to determine what HTTP requests the Ajax scripting would produce, send those HTTP requests yourself, receive the responses from the server, and update the relevant portions of the saved HTML data accordingly. –  Remy Lebeau Aug 2 '12 at 18:45
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.