Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have following regular expression: ^-?([0-9]{0,3}$|[0-9]{0,2}\.?[0-9]{0,1}$)

It should not allow 4 digit number such as 4444. The expression is working fine if I try here, but in javascript, the code is not working as expected. It is allowing 4 digit numbers. All other validations work fine.

Here is my code:

http://jsfiddle.net/PAscG/

reg0str = "^-?([0-9]{0,3}$|[0-9]{0,2}\.?[0-9]{0,1}$)";
var reg0 = new RegExp(reg0Str);
if (reg0.test(temp)) return true;

UPDATE TO EXPLAIN Functionality:

I want to allow only 3 digits. So either I can allow only 1 digit after decimal and 2 before decimal or I can allow max of 3 digits before decimal and nothing after decimal.

So my first part:
[0-9]{0,3}$ I assume this should allow a max of 3 digits and only numbers.

Next part: [0-9]{0,2}\.?[0-9]{0,1}$ should allow max of 2 digits before decimal and a max of 1 digit after decimal.

share|improve this question
    
What exactly is that regex supposed to do? Apart from the mistake (see my answer) it matches also the empty string, a minus, a dot, decimals with leading or trailing dot... – Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Following OP's clarification

The regexp is

/^-?(\d{0,3}\.?|\d{0,2)\.\d)$/

  ^        start of string
  -?       optional minus sign (use [-+]? if you accept a plus sign)
  (        start of OR group
    \d{0,3}  0 1, 2 or 3 digits
    \.?      optional decimal point
  |        OR
    \d{0,2}  0 1, or 2 digits
    \.       decimal point
    \d       final decimal
  )        end of OR grouping
  $        end of string
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, Just to clarify. I want to allow only 3 digits. So either I can allow only 1 digit after decimal and 2 before decimal or I can allow max of 3 digits before decimal and nothing after decimal. – RMN Aug 2 '12 at 7:53

Try this:

 var reg0str = "^\-?[0-9]{0,2}[\.]?[0-9]?$";

I'm not sure why, but the period seems to be being treated as the wildcard character if not encapsulated within a class.

Here's the updated jsfiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Why does your solution need any backslashes at all? – Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:28
1  
@Bergi The period is treated as a wildcard character in RegEx, and while it is not necessary to escape it within a character class, the backslash won't hurt anything – Zach Lesperance Aug 1 '12 at 18:36
1  
You don't have a regex, you only have a string literal. No need to escape anything than backslashes and quotes. See also my answer. – Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:39
    
@Bergi Hmmm, you're right. The backslashes would be fine in a regex literal but in this case they serve no purpose (unless they were escaped also). Thanks – Zach Lesperance Aug 1 '12 at 18:54

"…\.…" is a string literal - the backslash escapes the dot to a dot and the regex dot matches a digit. You would need to escape the backslash to pass a string with a backslash in the RegExp constructor:

new RegExp("^-?([0-9]{0,3}$|[0-9]{0,2}\\.?[0-9]{0,1}$)")

or you use a regex literal (simplified, but still matching the same):

/^-?\d{0,2}\.?\d?$/
share|improve this answer
2  
Yup, you're right about the \.. Couldn't the RegEx be simplified to this then? new RegExp("^-?[0-9]{0,2}\\.?[0-9]?$"); – Zach Lesperance Aug 1 '12 at 18:47
    
Thanks, good catch. Just added. – Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.