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Can I use the Qt Creator IDE for non-GUI programming? Now, compiling "Hello world" like plain C project:

#include <stdio.h>
int main(void)
{
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    return 0;
}

I get an error

:-1: error: Circular all <- project dependency dropped.

What did I do wrong?

I found the solution. In Tools - Options - Environment in Terminal a wrote xterm -e and it worked :) Thanks for all.

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What happens if you add the required #include <stdio.h> to the top? –  Keith Thompson Aug 1 '12 at 17:19
    
It was added. I didn't print it in my code block, sorry. –  milssky Aug 1 '12 at 17:44
    
See this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/9386426/… –  Roku Aug 1 '12 at 18:07
    
In my .pro file doesn't QT += core. I added in the .pro QT -= core, but I get error again. –  milssky Aug 1 '12 at 18:37
    
Yes, I have a friend who swears by it for his professional projects. –  tbert Aug 1 '12 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I've been using QtCreator for writing a console app in C. I just have the following at the top of the project file:

TEMPLATE = app
CONFIG += console
CONFIG -= qt

And then the usual stuff to include sources (eg, SOURCES += main.c). Seems to work fine.

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Thanks, I solved my problem. –  milssky Aug 2 '12 at 5:40

Theorically you can do this. All C programs are supposed to compile in C++.

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Well... For example, the function declaration void f() means different things in C and C++, so the call f(0), while valid in C, won't compile in C++. –  Vlad Aug 1 '12 at 17:17
    
Of course not, C++ isn't an extension to C. –  slartibartfast Aug 1 '12 at 17:19
1  
No, not all C programs are valid C++ programs. For example, int class; is a legal C declaration, but a syntax error in C++. –  Keith Thompson Aug 1 '12 at 17:19
    
@myrkos: Correct -- but it's close, and apart from the missing #include <stdio.h> the OP's C program is valid C++. –  Keith Thompson Aug 1 '12 at 17:21

QT has special class for non-gui apps, it's called QCoreApplication.

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