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Reading the coding horror, I just came across the FizzBuzz another time.

The original post is here: Coding Horror: Why Can't Programmers.. Program?

For those who do not know: FizzBuzz is a quite popular childrens game. Counting from 1 to 100, and every time a number is divisible by 3 calling "Fizz", every time a number is divisible by 5 calling "Buzz" and every time a number is divisible by 3 and 5, calling "FizzBuzz instead of the number

But this time, I just started to code it down. It was a job of a minute, but there are several things that I do not like.

Here is my code

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    var combinations = new Tuple<int, string>[] 
    { 
        new Tuple<int, string> (3, "Fizz"), 
        new Tuple<int, string> (5, "Buzz"), 
    };

    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        bool found = false;

        foreach (var comb in combinations)
        {
            if (i % comb.Item1 == 0)
            {
                found = true;
                Console.Write(comb.Item2);
            }
        }

        if (!found)
        {
            Console.Write(i);
        }

        Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
    }
}

So my questions are:

  1. How to get rid of the bool found?
  2. Is there a better way of testing than the foreach?
share|improve this question
9  
Probably best for CodeReview: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Chris Sinclair Aug 1 '12 at 17:47
    
Will have a look on that. I do not want other solutions, I want to improve "my" solution. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 17:54
    
What I definitly want is to stick to the outside declared pairs. And I am sure there is a way of getting rid of the bool. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:10
2  
If you're going to all the trouble of declaring a list of acceptable matches (overkill really), then I wouldn't even declare the list inside of your method. Pass it in as a parameter and let the calling code decide what is in the list. Then you've totally abstracted that part away. Otherwise, you're not gaining any benefit from creating the list in the first place (code will still need to be changed in the method if you want to change the list). –  Jason Down Aug 1 '12 at 18:23
    
This is for shortness of the question. Eventually I should even pass in the borders 1 and 100. I just wanted to have a solution that gets rid of the inline magic and is concise. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:35

20 Answers 20

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I think what you're trying to accomplish is a generic solution to FizzBuzz, that will work for any number of number-word combinations.

You have a good start - I think I can answer your questions with this example:

    public void DoFizzBuzz()
    {
        var combinations = new List<Tuple<int, string>>
        { 
            new Tuple<int, string> (3, "Fizz"), 
            new Tuple<int, string> (5, "Buzz"), 
        };

        Func<int, int, bool> isMatch = (i, comb) => i % comb == 0;
        for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
        {
            Console.Write(i);

            var matchingCombs = combinations.Where(c => isMatch(i, c.Item1)).ToList();
            if (matchingCombs.Any())
            {
                Console.Write(string.Join("", matchingCombs.Select(c => c.Item2)));
            }
            else
            {
                Console.Write(i);
            }
            Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
        }
    }

In practice, you would pass combinations in to the method, but I included it inside just to be concise.

share|improve this answer
    
LINQ helps even here! I like that one! +1! Possible candidate for accept! –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:11
3  
It's one thing to "solve the FizzBuzz problem" excessively and thoroughly. It's another to think that this would somehow make you look good in an interview situation. It's a fun solution, but it is painfully complex given the original problem's description. –  TheBuzzSaw Aug 1 '12 at 18:14
1  
Join combinations.Where(c=>isMatch(i,c.Item1)).Select(c=>c.Item2).DefaultIfEmpty(i.T‌​oString()) and you won't even need the if statement –  Jacob Krall Aug 1 '12 at 18:18
    
In an interview situation, I would definitly do the simplest thing to solve the problem. But sitting relaxed in front of my computer, the first thing after that is a refactoring. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:20
    
@TheBuzzSaw I agree, I would never give this answer in an interview, but it's a fun one to think about. Now we just need to hook it into a database table holding the combo's, and set up a web service for transmitting the results.. –  Rob H Aug 1 '12 at 18:20

I think your implementation is unnecessarily complex. This one does the job and is easier to understand:

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        bool fizz = i % 3 == 0;
        bool buzz = i % 5 == 0;
        if (fizz && buzz)
            Console.WriteLine ("FizzBuzz");
        else if (fizz)
            Console.WriteLine ("Fizz");
        else if (buzz)
            Console.WriteLine ("Buzz");
        else
            Console.WriteLine (i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
4  
@MareInfinitus, your version also uses magic numbers and magic strings, they're just declared somewhere else... You should keep to the KISS principle ;) –  Thomas Levesque Aug 1 '12 at 17:59
2  
If they are declared in a proper place, there is no magic. And the number and string are tied together, just as they should, outside the code. Introducing another number / key pair is then a nonissue. It is just adding another number / key pair, no more, no magic. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:00
5  
@MareInfinitus I really think you're missing the context of the original question. I agree with KISS in this case because the question establishes very few requirements. You should do only what is necessary to accomplish the task. –  TheBuzzSaw Aug 1 '12 at 18:12
13  
This is the correct answer. Fizzbuzz isn't the place to complexify for the sake of making it supposedly cleaner. If someone feels the need to introduce complexity in FizzBuzz, I wouldn't let them touch production code. –  Gilles Aug 6 '12 at 19:08
2  
@ema, in my mind it has always been related to object-oriented programming (the Wikipedia article seems to agree), but I might be wrong. Anyway, I wrote this code to solve the problem in the simplest possible way; I didn't even try to make it extensible... –  Thomas Levesque Jan 12 at 17:32

Take advantage of conditional format specifiers to get a nicely golfed version:

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    for(int i=1;i<101;i++)Console.WriteLine("{0:#;}{1:;;Fizz}{2:;;Buzz}",i%3*i%5==0?0:i,i%3,i%5);
}
share|improve this answer
    
what the heck, this one is crazy! ... so +1 ;) –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:04
    
Very cute answer –  Hogan Aug 1 '12 at 18:07
2  
not trying to be rude but...readability is important to me –  SageMage Aug 1 '12 at 21:10

3rd edit:

Here is one way to "get rid of the bool" from your version (that is replace the for loop in your original question with this):

for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
{
  var x = combinations.Where(n => i % n.Item1 == 0);

  if (x.Count() == 0)
    Console.Write(i);
  else
    Console.Write(string.Join("",x.Select(e => e.Item2)));

  Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
}

Prior answers:

For a pure C# solution check out Keith Thompson's solution.

using System;
class FizzBuzz {
    static void Main() {
        for (int n = 1; n <= 100; n ++) {
            if (n % 15 == 0) {
                Console.WriteLine("FizzBuzz");
            }
            else if (n % 3 == 0) {
                Console.WriteLine("Fizz");
            }
            else if (n % 5 == 0) {
                Console.WriteLine("Buzz");
            }
            else {
                Console.WriteLine(n);
            }
        }
    }
}

I worked a bit on FixBuzz using linq. These are the solutions I came up with -- I believe they represent the best way to express the solution to this problem using Linq. (GitHub)

using System;
using System.Linq;

class FizzBuzz {
  static void Main() {
    var list = Enumerable.Range(1,100)
                .Select(n => {
                      if (n % 15 == 0) {
                        return "FizzBuzz";
                      }
                      if (n % 3 == 0) {
                        return "Fizz";
                      }
                      if (n % 5 == 0) {
                        return "Buzz";
                      }
                      return n.ToString();
                    });

    foreach(string item in list)
      Console.WriteLine(item);
  }
}

and the crazy one line version:

using System;
using System.Linq;

class FizzBuzz {
    static void Main() {
      Console.WriteLine(
      String.Join(
        Environment.NewLine,
        Enumerable.Range(1, 100)
          .Select(n => n % 15 == 0 ? "FizzBuzz" 
                     : n % 3 == 0 ? "Fizz" 
                     : n % 5 == 0 ? "Buzz" 
                     : n.ToString())
      ));
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is another solution, but does not answer my questions. Besides that, I did not do the -1! –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 17:37
    
It gets rid of the bool found... it is another way (better is subjective). –  Jason Down Aug 1 '12 at 17:41
    
Ok, now I made my point clear and answered your question. –  Hogan Aug 1 '12 at 17:45
    
@KeithThompson - I hope you don't mind my quoting you in this answer. –  Hogan Aug 1 '12 at 17:49
    
@HenkHolterman - that is supposed to be a drop in to the for loop of the original question. –  Hogan Aug 1 '12 at 20:08

Unrolled for maximum efficiency. This program can outfizzbuzz all others.

public void FizzBuzz()
{
    const string FIZZ = "Fizz";
    const string BUZZ = "Buzz";
    const string FIZZBUZZ = "FizzBuzz";

    int i = 0;
    while (i < 150)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(FIZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(BUZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(FIZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(FIZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(BUZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(FIZZ); ++i;
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(++i);
        Console.WriteLine(FIZZBUZZ); ++i;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
HEAVY LAUGHING HERE! +1 (btw, I think C# compiler will optimize it already to unrolled version) –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:14
2  
Note that this one does not stop at 100. –  Wug Aug 1 '12 at 18:14
    
how should it, it has 15 unrolled events, it can not stop at 100. (as 100 is no multiple of 15) –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:15
    
It stops at 150 since the loop increments i a total of 15 times each iteration. –  Wug Aug 1 '12 at 18:16
public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        if (i % 3 == 0)
            Console.Write("Fizz");
        if (i % 5 == 0)
            Console.Write("Buzz");
        if (!(i % 3 == 0 || i % 5 == 0))
            Console.Write(i);

        Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
    }
}

This gets rid of the bool found, but forces you to do duplicate evaluation. It is slightly different from some of the other answers using i % 15 == 0 for the FizzBuzz qualification. Whether or not this is better is up for debate. However, it is a different way.

share|improve this answer
    
It is a different way, and I want specifically to improve "my" way. –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 18:03

I recommend using the ++i instead of the i++ in a for loop because i++ requires a copy to be made ;)

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    for (int i = 1; i < 101; ++i)
    {
        if (i % 15 == 0)
            Console.WriteLine ("FizzBuzz");
        else if (i % 3 == 0)
            Console.WriteLine ("Fizz");
        else if (i % 5 == 0)
            Console.WriteLine ("Buzz");
        else
            Console.WriteLine (i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Almost the same as Thomas Levesque's solution, similar comment here –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 17:53
1  
Now there are ++i everywhere in the example. Thank you for your valuable input! –  Mare Infinitus Aug 1 '12 at 20:24

Will add my 5 cents to solution by Linq. Everybody is using Select, which is basically Map function. IMHO foldl function suits better to solve this quiz:

Console.WriteLine(
                Enumerable
                .Range(1, 100)
                .Aggregate(new StringBuilder(), (builder, i)
                    => i % 15 == 0 ? builder.AppendLine("FizzBuzz")
                     : i % 3 == 0 ? builder.AppendLine("Fizz")
                     : i % 5 == 0 ? builder.AppendLine("Buzz")
                     : builder.AppendLine(i.ToString()))
                .ToString());
share|improve this answer

Ok, what the heck, here's the solution I've come to like :)

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        bool isDivisibleByThree = i % 3 == 0;
        bool isDivisibleByFive = i % 5 == 0;

        if (isDivisibleByThree || isDivisibleByFive)
        {
            if (isDivisibleByThree)
                cout << "Fizz";

            if (isDivisibleByFive)
                cout << "Buzz";
        }
        else
        {
            cout << i;
        }
        cout << endl;
    }
}

Obviously, this is not the fastest solution, but I like it because it emphasizes readability and makes the "FizzBuzz" case no longer a special case, but something that will happen naturally through the code path.

In the end, what I love most about this question whenever it comes up is that we get to see just how many different solutions ppl can come up with.

share|improve this answer

I think you started with a complicated way. Improving that code would be more complicated. You can use a temp variable to track and display that variable at the end of the FizzBuzz check. Below is code and you can also watch this detail c# FizzBuzz youtube video ( http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OX5TM3q-JQg ) which explains how the below code is implemented.

    for (int j = 1; j <= 100; j++)
    {
    string Output = "";

    if (j % 3 == 0) Output = "Fizz";// Divisible by 3 --> Fizz

    if (j % 5 == 0) Output += "Buzz"; // Divisible by 5 --> Buzz

    if (Output == "") Output = j.ToString(); // If none then --> number

    Console.WriteLine(Output); // Finally print the complete output
    }
share|improve this answer
    
The best solution so far :) –  sandesh kota Sep 11 at 10:02

Did anyone do this one already?

Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select(x =>
                (x % 15 == 0) ? "FIZZBUZZ"
                : (x % 5 == 0) ? "BUZZ"
                : (x % 3 == 0) ? "FIZZ"
                : x.ToString()
                )
                .ToList()
                .ForEach(console.WriteLine);
share|improve this answer
    
concise, and a nice solution –  Mare Infinitus Nov 28 '13 at 6:47

The FizzBuzz question is a great interview question. We have started using it in our interview process. It is astounding how many people cannot solve such a simple problem.

Keep in mind, the original blog post was eventually locked due to a flood of people posting more solutions. Hahaha.

Regardless, here is mine in C++! ^_^

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        bool isMultipleOfThree = (i % 3) == 0;
        bool isMultipleOfFive = (i % 5) == 0;

        if (isMultipleOfThree) cout << "Fizz";
        if (isMultipleOfFive) cout << "Buzz";
        if (!isMultipleOfThree && !isMultipleOfFive) cout << i;

        cout << '\n';
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually, I had this solution laying around in a file already. The fact that it resembles his is merely indication of how accepted a solution it is. As far as this SO question, I just wanted to add that it is a common question. –  TheBuzzSaw Aug 1 '12 at 18:08
1  
@MareInfinitus Someone who leaves optimization to the compiler has never had to build something that depends heavily on performance, or has wasted a ton of cycles dreaming that the compiler would take care of it for them. The solution being in C++ does make it better than C# because it will run at least 100x faster for that simple fact. –  Cdaragorn Aug 1 '12 at 19:45
1  
@MareInfinitus The idea isn't to optimize code for the sake of optimizing...the idea is to get in the habit of optimizing code so that you don't have to think about it when you run into issues. –  SageMage Aug 1 '12 at 19:54
1  
@MareInfinitus The optimization is indeed irrelevant in a program this size. However, the others are simply trying to point that you should strive to have good coding habits. Letting yourself slide because "the compiler will save me" eventually leads you to a situation where the compiler cannot optimize for you because of some ambiguity or (accidental) dependency on run-time data. No need to become defensive. –  TheBuzzSaw Aug 1 '12 at 20:07
1  
@MareInfinitus I apologize that my comment seemed to be attacking you. I simply see too many ppl who go too far in the extreme in both directions (overoptimizing or not thinking about optimization at all), and try to dispel either idea when I see it presented. In this particular case, I've seen the switch from i++ to ++i make a noticable difference even in loops of only a few hundred, so it is a habit that I think everyone should try to follow, even if some languages will optimize it for you. –  Cdaragorn Aug 1 '12 at 20:13

The original questions were: 1.How to get rid of the bool found? 2.Is there a better way of testing than the foreach?

This gets rid of the bool and the foreach, and I think it's still readable.

public static void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    var combinations = new Tuple<int, string>[]  
    {  
        new Tuple<int, string> (3, "Fizz"),  
        new Tuple<int, string> (5, "Buzz"),  
    };

    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    {
        var fb = combinations.Where(t => {
            if (i % t.Item1 == 0)
            {
                Console.Write(t.Item2);
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }).ToList();

        if (!fb.Any())
        {
            Console.Write(i);
        }

        Console.Write(Environment.NewLine);
    }
} 

Who'd a thunk we'd be getting so excited about a simple kids game? :)

share|improve this answer
    
I love the fizzbuzz question. My friends from school codegolf it out sometimes. –  Wug Aug 1 '12 at 18:19

With the input of Rob H and Jacob Krall here is what I have at the moment. Perhaps I will play around with that in future... just wanted to provide it.

public void DoFizzBuzz()
{
    // expect this to come in as parameter
    var combinations = new Tuple<int, string>[] 
    { 
        new Tuple<int, string> (3, "Fizz"), 
        new Tuple<int, string> (5, "Buzz"), 
    };

    Func<int, int, bool> isMatch = (i, comb) => i % comb == 0;

    // expect the borders 1, 100 to come in as parameters
    for (int i = 1; i <= 100; ++i)
    {
        var matchingCombs = combinations.Where(c => isMatch(i, c.Item1)).DefaultIfEmpty(new Tuple<int, string>(i, i.ToString())).Aggregate((v, w) => new Tuple<int, string>(v.Item1, v.Item2 + w.Item2)).Item2;
        Console.WriteLine(matchingCombs);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I would suggest this compact code as an addition to the previous simple and nice versions.

for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++) // i++ but not ++i as in your example, be careful here
{
    bool fizz = i % 3 == 0;
    bool buzz = i % 5 == 0;
    string output = fizz && buzz ? "FizzBuzz" :
                            fizz ? "Fizz" :
                            buzz ? "Buzz" :
                            i.ToString();

    Console.WriteLn(output);
}
share|improve this answer

I am a beginner, here is my attempt:

public void DoFizzBuzz()
   {
       for (int i = 1; i < 101; i++)
       {

           if ((i % 3 == 0) && (i % 5 == 0))
           {
               Console.WriteLine("{0} FizzBuzz", i);
           }
           else if (i % 3 == 0)
           {
               Console.WriteLine("{0} Fizz", i);
           }
           else if (i % 5 == 0)
           {
               Console.WriteLine("{0} Buzz", i);
           }
           else
           {
               Console.WriteLine(i);
           }

       }
       Console.ReadLine();
   }

Is there anything wrong with my approach? Mine seems a lot simpler than everyone's else approach so it must be wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the one that recruiters probably want to see. And the question was: "What would you change about it" –  Mare Infinitus Feb 13 '13 at 6:14
    
There's nothing wrong with it ... there are many ways to skin a cat (as wrong as the saying is), and yours is just as good. Some use sharper knives, some use crude stone axes, some do it quick and painless, some like to bring the tribe to help, some like the cat to look pretty, some like the eat the meat and care not about it looks ... –  Noctis Dec 18 '13 at 0:14

You can use either use this and only take the amount you want

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    GetFizzBuzz().Take(100).ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
}

private static IEnumerable<string> GetFizzBuzz()
{
    for (var i = 0; i < int.MaxValue; i++)
    {
        if (i % 3 == 0 && i % 5 == 0) yield return "FizzBuzz";
        if (i % 3 == 0) yield return "Fizz";
        yield return i % 5 == 0 ? "Buzz" : i.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
    }
}

Or simply use this :

Enumerable.Range(1, 100).Select(s => {
    if (s % 3 == 0 && s % 5 == 0) return "FizzBuzz";
    if (s % 3 == 0) return "Fizz";
    return s%5 == 0 ? "Buzz" : s.ToString(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture);
}).ToList().ForEach(Console.WriteLine);
share|improve this answer

You want probably make it configurable, but the question is what should be made configurable - we don't know that. Maybe we should make configurable all the cycle (FizzBuzz has the cycle). Here is very small and fun version with configurable cycle:

string[] fizzBuzzCycle = 
    "FizzBuzz,{0},{0},Fizz,{0},Buzz,Fizz,{0},{0},Fizz,Buzz,{0},Fizz,{0},{0}"
    .Split(',');

for (int i = 1; i <= 100; i++)
    Console.WriteLine(fizzBuzzCycle[i%fizzBuzzCycle.Length], i);

So if the strings or whole cycle should be changed it is easy to change. But you just don't know what to make configurable. Maybe condition will change: "for prime numbers print Pizz" and for this modification the solution by @ThomasLevesque is better, because it is easier to change.

share|improve this answer

In my opinion, the FizzBuzz problem is always presented as a challenge to the interviwee to make the word FizzBuzz appear without explicitly printing it. Here is my solution in C#.

internal void PrintFizzBuzzAlternative(int num)
{
    if (num % 5 == 0)
        Console.Write("Fizz");
    if (num % 3 == 0)
        Console.Write("Buzz");
    if (num % 5 != 0 && num % 3 != 0)
        Console.Write(num);
    Console.WriteLine();
}
share|improve this answer

Without using any If's, C# code.

 //False = 0, True = 1.
    private void DivisibilityByFiveThreeTest(int num)
    {
        string[,] values = new string [2,2]{
                             {"None","Fizz"},
                             {"Buzz","FizzBuzz"}
                             };
        for(int i=1;i< num;i++)
        Console.WriteLine(values[Convert.ToInt32(i % 5 == 0), Convert.ToInt32(i%3==0)]);

    }
share|improve this answer
    
why down vote ?? –  CodeR Aug 18 at 21:07

protected by Kirk Woll Jan 23 '13 at 15:41

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