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The following SQL generates all matching records between two tables that have identical schemas and then proceeds to iterate over the cursor that stores this result set. I do a row by row insert with a commit at the end of this function. My question is how can I get the maximum performance from this type of query? Code follows:

BEGIN  
DECLARE    
   CURSOR foo IS  
        SELECT * FROM tableOne to  
        WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM tableTwo tt  
                       WHERE TO.FOO = TT.FOO  
                       AND TO.BAR = TT.BAR);  --THIS TAKES 5 MINUTES (66 MILLION ROWS)
     BEGIN  
           FOR nextFoo IN foo  
     LOOP  
            INSERT INTO tracker t  
               (id,foo,bar,baz)  
            VALUES(trackerSequence.nextval, nextFoo.foo,nextFoo.bar,nextFoo.baz);  
     END LOOP;   
     COMMIT;  
     END;  
END;

This query can take upwards of an hour and I am trying to reduce the time cost associated with it. I will be processing 140 million records in general so I am expecting to double the amount of time this process takes. All columns are indexed.

Version information:

10g 10.2

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:Why you have not tried bulk insert? –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:00
    
@GauravSoni the initial test cases I was supplied with were for 10k records. I have run into a scale problem quite clearly. Please post an answer that uses bulk insert as that would be beneficial. –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:02
    
:What is your version of Oracle you are using? –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:06
    
@GauravSoni Oracle 10g 10.2 –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:08
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6 Answers

how about

INSERT INTO tracker t SELECT trackerSequence.nextVal
                            ,foo
                            ,bar
                            ,baz 
                      FROM tableOne to 
                            INNER JOIN tabletwo tt 
                         ON (to.foo = tt.foo and to.bar=tt.bar);

I wonder if that would be optimized better.

Also make sure the tracker -table indexes are disabled while inserting..

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How would I get my sequence generator to fire in that query? –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:10
    
umm. wouldnt know. Do you have to have them in sequence, or could you generate the sequence on a second pass? –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 1 '12 at 18:12
    
I guess you could just use trackerSequence.nextVal like in your example –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 1 '12 at 18:13
    
instead of "id" –  Markus Mikkolainen Aug 1 '12 at 18:13
2  
@Woot4Moo Just include the sequnce in your select statement that feeds the insert. Nothing is faster than raw SQL, it's even faster than PL/SQL bulk collections or a FORALL. –  Wolf Aug 1 '12 at 18:14
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OK, I know you wanted the cursor...

The only real advantage to using the cursor is to commit every 10k? rows when processing that much data to avoid filling the logs up.

Unless you really need the cursor, Eliminate the row processing.

insert into tracker (id, foo, bar, baz)
select trackersequence.nextval, t1.foo, t1.bar, t2.baz
from tableone t1, tabletwo t2 where 
t1.foo = t2.foo and
t1.bar = t2.bar;

Direct Path Insert hint as suggested

insert /*+ append */ into tracker (id, foo, bar, baz)
select trackersequence.nextval, t1.foo, t1.bar, t2.baz
from tableone t1, tabletwo t2 where 
t1.foo = t2.foo and
t1.bar = t2.bar;
share|improve this answer
    
:+1 this will be much faster –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:21
    
:Direct Path insert hint will also boost up the performance –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:25
    
If I can avoid the overhead of the cursor hooray. This process executes several times a day. I will test this later today / first thing in the morning. –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:26
    
@Woot4Moo:Also try with insert/*+append*/ into tracker.... –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:30
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DECLARE    

CURSOR foo_cur 
IS SELECT * FROM tableOne TO  
    WHERE EXISTS (SELECT * FROM tableTwo tt  
                   WHERE TO.FOO = TT.FOO  
                   AND TO.BAR = TT.BAR);  --THIS TAKES 5 MINUTES (66 MILLION ROWS)  

TYPE foo_nt IS TABLE OF tableOne%ROWTYPE;
v_foo_nt foo_nt;

 BEGIN

  OPEN foo_cur ;
  LOOP
  FETCH foo_cur BULK COLLECT INTO v_foo_nt LIMIT 1000;

       FORALL  i IN v_foo_nt.FIRST..v_foo_nt.LAST  
         INSERT INTO tracker t  
           (id,foo,bar,baz)  
          VALUES(trackerSequence.nextval, v_foo_nt(i).foo,v_foo_nt(i).bar,v_foo_nt(i).baz);  

EXIT WHEN foo_cur%NOTFOUND;  
END LOOP; 
  CLOSE foo_cur;  
  COMMIT;  
 END;  
END;
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@Woot4Moo:Not tested ,but it will work if you have 11g version ,and much better answer than me in the other 2 answers in terms of performance –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:11
    
Ok I will try this in 10 and see if works. I know 9 brought a lot of changes. –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:12
3  
If you're going to do a BULK COLLECT you should really have a LIMIT. Fetching 66 million rows of data into the database's PGA is going to create performance issues. If each row is just 100 bytes, for example, that would require ~6 GB of PGA space. Most database servers are not going to be configured to allow that much PGA space to be consumed. If you happen to be on a machine that has tons of RAM allocated to Oracle, one process chewing up 6 GB of PGA is going to have some serious negative performance impacts on other processes in the database. –  Justin Cave Aug 1 '12 at 18:30
    
@JustinCave:Thanks Justin,i will update my answer based on that –  Gaurav Soni Aug 1 '12 at 18:36
1  
The appropriate LIMIT doesn't really depend on the server. The most efficient LIMIT is generally somewhere between 100 and 1000. You can try different choices for your particular process though it's unlikely that the difference is going to be huge. A 'LIMIT' of 100 eliminates 99% of the context shifts, a LIMIT of 1000 eliminates 99.9% of the context shifts. It's unlikely that you're going to get much more performance gain from eliminating that last 0.1% of the context shifts and increasing the amount of RAM you're using is likely to add more to your overhead than you gain. –  Justin Cave Aug 1 '12 at 19:00
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First - how can you optimize your PL/SQL's performance:

  • Disable indexes and any other constraints on target tables before you begin your load and re-enable them after you are done
  • Don't commit at the very end - have commit points to free-up rollback segments

Second - don't do the insert with PL/SQL. Use BulkLoading (as already suggested by some comments). you can easily find lots of info on BulkLoading if you Google for "oracle sql loader"

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I don't think sql loader is appropriate in this instance but I will check. –  Woot4Moo Aug 1 '12 at 18:09
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I have almost always received better performance with such bulk data inserts by using a combination of BITMAP INDEXES and using a DPL (Direct Path Load) i.e. with the use of hint /*+ APPEND+/.

I would also assume that with this you would have proper indexes on both TT.FOO, TT.BAR and TO.FOO, TO.BAR. So somethink like

INSERT /*+ APPEND*/
  INTO TRACKER T
SELECT trackerSequence.nextval, to.foo,to.bar,to.baz
  FROM tableOne to  
  WHERE EXISTS (SELECT 'x' 
                  FROM tableTwo tt  
                 WHERE TO.FOO = TT.FOO  
                   AND TO.BAR = TT.BAR);

Also- Keep in mind that the EXIST clause might bite you back under certain situations. So, you may want to use simple outer joins.

INSERT /*+ APPEND*/
  INTO TRACKER T
SELECT DISTINCT trackerSequence.nextval, to.foo,to.bar,to.baz
  FROM tableOne to , tableTwo tt
  WHERE TO.FOO = TT.FOO  
    AND TO.BAR = TT.BAR;

Remember - DPL (Direct path load) will not always improve the performance of your query, it may improve (or help) if your table is properly partitioned.

Try Explain plan on these queries to find out the best. Also, (as one of the answer already mentions) do not commit at the end, but do not commit on every record either. It would be suggested to use a custom commit point something similar to while using LIMIT XXXX while BULK COLLECTing. Your commit points will govern how large your ROLLBAK segments are. You can also use your custom Commit points (as simple as as counter) procedurally (i.e. in a PLSQL BLOCK).

Query performance also depends on the HWM of your table (to be specific), you would almost always want to perform under the HWM of the table. Whilst TRUNCATE on the TRACKER table will help achieve this, previous data on it will be lost, so this could hardly be a solution here. Follow this AskTom link to learn how to find HWM.

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1  
A bitmap index is usually not a good fit for tables that are changed often. A table named "tracker" seems to indicate a high volume of write activity and it's definitely not a good idea to have a bitmap index on them. –  a_horse_with_no_name Aug 1 '12 at 19:37
    
An why would that be? What do you mean by "Tables that are changed very often"? i have used BIs on tables for long time and never faced any issues. Ofcourse you should have the basic knowledge about indexing and bitmap indexes before creating one just for the sake of performance improvement. –  Annjawn Aug 1 '12 at 19:44
1  
I'm not really sure where you are getting the need for a bitmap index at all in this insert process. The OP doesn't do any reads from the tracker table... Oracle's Bitmap Indexes are primarily useful for the bitmap merge operation for selecting a list of rowids for use in a join or result set. –  N West Aug 1 '12 at 19:50
1  
The problem is that concurrent inserts/updates on the table will suffer from contention with bitmap indexes because updating one row can possibly lock 1000 rows for other updates (due to the fact that one block in the bitmap index covers a lot rows). Also the bitmap index deteriorates when being updated very often. The usual recommendation is to use them in a data warehouse environmnet and create them after loading the tables. From the manual: "The internal representation of bitmaps is best suited for applications with low levels of concurrent transactions, such as data warehousing" –  a_horse_with_no_name Aug 1 '12 at 19:51
    
I meant the wrong table there. The way the question is asked TableOne and TableTwo contains exponentially large amounts of data, and hardly resemble any real time transactional table (more like DW tables), having Bitmap indexes on those table "could" possibly increase performance here. But these are just assumptions. Even a plain DPL could not help much performance wise if proper partitioning is not there. But again, these are assumptions. Also I wouldn't expect this INSERT procedure to be placed on a real time application, its best suited as a 'nightly' batch job. –  Annjawn Aug 1 '12 at 20:18
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I have found the following will do 130 million inserts in about 49 minutes.

INSERT INTO tracker t  
    SELECT * FROM tableOne to  
        WHERE NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM tableTwo tt  
                       WHERE TO.FOO = TT.FOO  
                       AND TO.BAR = TT.BAR);
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