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I have been attempting to communicate with a device of mine via an RS232 serial port(in my case it is COM6). My code is supposed to write a string of ascii values to the device and then read the response, however I cannot seem to get any response. The program seems to work relatively fine when I have it write and read to a file in my computer, but not for when I designate COM6. Here is the latest edition of my code:

using namespace std;

const char ASCII[ ]= "0123456789ABCDEF";
char *Checksum (char *buffer)
{
static char Hex[10];
static int a1, a2;
register unsigned int i;
int sum;
printf("%s \n", buffer);
sum = 256;
for ( i=0 ; i<strlen(buffer) ; i++ )
{
sum-=buffer[i];
if ( sum<0 )
sum+= 256;
}
a1 = (sum & 0xF0) >> 4;
a2 = sum & 0x0F;
Hex[0] = ASCII[a1];
Hex[1] = ASCII[a2];
Hex[2] = 0;
printf("the checksum is %s \n",Hex);
return(Hex);
}


int main()
{
char data[80], input[80], *data2;
char *response;
DCB dcb;
bool retVal;
DWORD dwBytesTransferred;
DWORD byteswritten;
printf("the variable response is initially: %d\n", response);

dcb.BaudRate = CBR_19200; //19200 Baud
dcb.ByteSize = 8; //8 data bits
dcb.Parity = NOPARITY; //no parity
dcb.StopBits = ONESTOPBIT; //1 stop

//New open port area
HANDLE        hPort;
  if ((hPort = CreateFile ( "\\\\.\\COM6",
      GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE,
      0,              // exclusive access
      NULL,           // no security attrs
      OPEN_EXISTING,
      FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL,
      NULL)) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
  {
      printf("SUCCESS opening the port\n");// success
  } 
//GetCommState
DCB Dcb;
  GetCommState (hPort, &Dcb);
  Dcb.BaudRate        = CBR_19200;
  Dcb.StopBits        = ONESTOPBIT;
  Dcb.ByteSize        = 8;
  Dcb.Parity          = NOPARITY;
  Dcb.fParity         = 0;
  Dcb.fOutxCtsFlow    = 0;
  Dcb.fOutxDsrFlow    = 0;
  Dcb.fDsrSensitivity = 0;
  Dcb.fTXContinueOnXoff = TRUE;
  Dcb.fOutX           = 0;
  Dcb.fInX            = 0;
  Dcb.fNull           = 0;
  Dcb.fErrorChar      = 0;
  Dcb.fAbortOnError   = 0;
  Dcb.fRtsControl     = RTS_CONTROL_DISABLE;
  Dcb.fDtrControl     = DTR_CONTROL_DISABLE;

//Flushing

FlushFileBuffers( hPort );
  PurgeComm (hPort, PURGE_TXABORT | PURGE_RXABORT | PURGE_TXCLEAR | PURGE_RXCLEAR);
  COMSTAT     comStat;
  DWORD       dwErrorFlags;
  ClearCommError ( hPort, &dwErrorFlags, &comStat );

//NEW commtimeouts area
COMMTIMEOUTS CommTimeOuts;
 DWORD dwTimeout = 3000;  // <- set timeout in milliseconds
     if(!dwTimeout)
     {   // Don't use timeout -> Read the bytes already in input buffer and return immediately
         CommTimeOuts.ReadIntervalTimeout      = MAXDWORD;
         CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = 0;
     } else
     {   // Use given timeout, wait until the requested number of bytes are read - or timeout
         CommTimeOuts.ReadIntervalTimeout         = 0;
         CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant    = dwTimeout;
     }
     CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier  = 0;
     CommTimeOuts.WriteTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 0;
     CommTimeOuts.WriteTotalTimeoutConstant   = 0;
     SetCommTimeouts (hPort, &CommTimeOuts);
printf("insert ASCII code string you wish to send:");
scanf("%s", input);
strcpy(data, "{0x02}");
strcat(data, input);
printf("%s \n", data);
data2=Checksum(data);
strcat(data, data2);
strcat(data, "{0x03}");
printf("the final sent message will be: %s \n",data);
retVal = WriteFile(hPort,data, strlen(data), &byteswritten, NULL);
printf("Number of bytes written: %d\n",  byteswritten);
printf("Write Success? %d\n", retVal);
retVal=ReadFile (hPort, &response, 20, &dwBytesTransferred, NULL);
printf("Read Success? %d\n", retVal);
printf("Port Response: %d\n", response);
free(response);
return 0;
}

Summary of latest discoveries: Using the Free Serial Port Monitor that Habi suggested I now know for sure that WriteFile is functioning correctly and COM6 is in receiving the message. I'm still looking for a crossover cable to double check that the message is being transferred across the line. I figure while I try to figure that out if someone could look at this new edition and tell me if there is anything wrong, particularly in relation to the ReadFile function, it would be much appreciated. It bothers me that the Free Serial Port software is only showing the data passed from my computer and not a response from the device at all. =\

share|improve this question
1  
You really should be using the Win32 API (CreateFile, ReadFile, and WriteFile) for this. stdio file streams buffer the data unless you tell it not to with setvbuf(3) or by flushing it with fflush(3). Also you cannot fseek/ftell on a serial port, I guarantee you those calls are failing. –  Adam Rosenfield Aug 1 '12 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Instead of

"COM6"

try

"\\\\.\\COM6"

And I would recommend to use CreateFile(), ReadFile(), WriteFile().

To open the COM port try this:

HANDLE        hComDev;

if ((hComDev = CreateFile ( "\\\\.\\COM6",
    GENERIC_READ | GENERIC_WRITE,
    0,              // exclusive access
    NULL,           // no security attrs
    OPEN_EXISTING,
    FILE_ATTRIBUTE_NORMAL,
    NULL)) != INVALID_HANDLE_VALUE)
{
      // success
}

It seems that calling GetCommState() is missing in your code. Try this to configure the COM port:

DCB Dcb;

GetCommState (hComDev, &Dcb); 

Dcb.BaudRate        = CBR_19200;
Dcb.StopBits        = ONESTOPBIT;
Dcb.ByteSize        = 8;
Dcb.Parity          = NOPARITY;
Dcb.fParity         = 0;
Dcb.fOutxCtsFlow    = 0;
Dcb.fOutxDsrFlow    = 0;
Dcb.fDsrSensitivity = 0;
Dcb.fTXContinueOnXoff = TRUE;
Dcb.fOutX           = 0;
Dcb.fInX            = 0;
Dcb.fNull           = 0;
Dcb.fErrorChar      = 0;
Dcb.fAbortOnError   = 0;
Dcb.fRtsControl     = RTS_CONTROL_DISABLE;
Dcb.fDtrControl     = DTR_CONTROL_DISABLE;

And to initially clear the COM port, I would do a reset like this before starting to send and receive bytes:

FlushFileBuffers( hComDev );

PurgeComm (hComDev, PURGE_TXABORT | PURGE_RXABORT | PURGE_TXCLEAR | PURGE_RXCLEAR);

COMSTAT     comStat;
DWORD       dwErrorFlags;
ClearCommError ( hComDev, &dwErrorFlags, &comStat );

You ask for timeouts? To configure time outs try this:

COMMTIMEOUTS CommTimeOuts;
DWORD dwTimeout = ....  // <- set timeout in milliseconds

if(!dwTimeout)
{   // Don't use timeout -> Read the bytes already in input buffer and return immediately
    CommTimeOuts.ReadIntervalTimeout      = MAXDWORD;
    CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant = 0;
}
else
{   // Use given timeout, wait until the requested number of bytes are read - or timeout
    CommTimeOuts.ReadIntervalTimeout         = 0;
    CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutConstant    = dwTimeout;
}
CommTimeOuts.ReadTotalTimeoutMultiplier  = 0;
CommTimeOuts.WriteTotalTimeoutMultiplier = 0;
CommTimeOuts.WriteTotalTimeoutConstant   = 0;

SetCommTimeouts (hComDev, &CommTimeOuts);

My code is supposed to write a string of ascii values to the device and then read the response, however I cannot seem to get any response.

Are you sure that the bytes are really sent to the device? If you have the option, take a oscilloscope and monitor the PC's Tx line. Send some bytes and check baudrate and start/stop bits. If you have no hardware to monitor this signal, take a software based serial monitor, e.g. Free Serial Port Monitor. I have no experience with that kind of software tools but they should show you at least that the Windows drivers try to send something via the COM port of your choice.

Greetings Habi

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I'll try to give that a try. It looks slightly different from my other attempts at using Win32 API functions, so maybe it'll address whatever might have been causing the issue, or at least get me closer. I really appreciate the assistance! –  Hazar Aug 1 '12 at 20:26
    
Thanks for directing me toward the Free Serial Port Monitor! That helped assure me that the WriteFile was at least sending to COM6. I edited my question to reflect the new version of my program. –  Hazar Aug 3 '12 at 13:37

If you have been trying for a month then I would recommend you look at the windows function CreateFile. I have used this for serial port comms and it works fine. You might also want to look at the DCB struct and GetCommState and SetCommState functions to configure the serial port. WriteFile can be used to write data to the serial port. I cannot post all of my code as it owned by my company, but this should help you get started.

Also ClearCommError may be of help to you to query if any data is on the serial port buffer when you are waiting to read from it.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm sorry I mistyped on the bottom there, I meant CreateFile, not openfile. And I used GetCommState and SetCommState too. However the ReadFile function returned nothing (it reported that it read nothing and its buffer was unchanged). ClearCommError might come in handy though, thanks for that pointer. –  Hazar Aug 1 '12 at 19:08
    
@user1569340 well you could try the ClearCommError to see if there is actually any data present on the buffer. You know for sure that the other application that sends your reply accross the serial port works? –  mathematician1975 Aug 1 '12 at 19:47
    
I unfortunately have no idea for sure. WriteFile returns as though it were successful however my device remains unresponsive. It could be possible that I am sending it an erroneous command (which would not be a surprise because it seems like the producers of it intentionally wrote very vague instructions on the syntax of these commands, likely to encourage the purchase of more of their software to do it for you...), However the instructions do indicate that I should get a "Not Aknowledged" response should that occur. So my general impression is that Writefile most likely is not succeeding. –  Hazar Aug 1 '12 at 20:05
    
Hmm it sounds like you could be doing all the right things but not getting a response. If I were you if at all possible I would set up another machine, connect to the serial port of that using a cross-over cable and write a serial port reading application (it doesnt take much code). This way you will see for sure what if your write succeeds. The WriteFile function should return the number of bytes written - do you check that? Is it possible that you need to take endianness into account ???? I only ask these questions as I was in the same position as you not so long ago. –  mathematician1975 Aug 1 '12 at 20:16
    
And another thing, check again all of the configuration options and make sure that they are what they should be –  mathematician1975 Aug 1 '12 at 20:17

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