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I have the simplest class text:

class Text
{
    char* txt;
public:
    Text(const char*);
    Text(const Text&);
    ~Text();

    const Text operator+(const Text&) const;
};

and implementation:

#include "text.h"

Text::~Text()
{
    delete[] this->txt;
}


Text::Text(const char* argText)
{
    txt = new char[strlen(argText)+1];
    strcpy(txt, argText);
}

Text::Text(const Text& other)
{
    txt = new char[strlen(other.txt)+1];
    strcpy(txt, other.txt);
}

const Text Text::operator+(const Text& other) const
{
    char* ttxt, *newLine;
    ttxt = new char[strlen(txt)+strlen(other.txt)+2];
    strcat(ttxt, this->txt);
    newLine = new char[2];
    newLine[0] = '\n';
    newLine[1] = '\0';
    strcat(ttxt, newLine);
    strcat(ttxt, other.txt);
    Text temp(ttxt);
    delete[] newLine;
    return temp;
}

and main:

#include "text.h"

int main()
{
    Text a("First text.");
    Text b("Second lol!!\n kthxbye!!!!!!!");
    Text c(a+b);
}

and the program breaks on newLine = new char[2]; I tried increasing it, like new char[5] but still it breaks. The message I recieve is:

Windows has triggered a breakpoint in prTextClass.exe.

This may be due to a corruption of the heap, which indicates a bug in prTextClass.exe or any of the DLLs it has loaded...

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3  
2  
You also have a memory leak because you never delete[] ttxt. –  GWW Aug 1 '12 at 18:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
const Text Text::operator+(const Text& other) const
{
    char* ttxt, *newLine;
    ttxt = new char[strlen(txt)+strlen(other.txt)+2];
    strcat(ttxt, this->txt);
 // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ This line is buggy
    newLine = new char[2];
    newLine[0] = '\n';
    newLine[1] = '\0';
    strcat(ttxt, newLine);
    strcat(ttxt, other.txt);
    Text temp(ttxt);
    // ....

Note that ttxt = new char[strlen(txt)+strlen(other.txt)+2]; does not initialize the array content. Thus, when strcat() is called, it goes through ttxt to find the first '\0' character as the end of string ttxt and thus stopped at an unknown position.

You should change it into

strcpy(ttxt, this->txt);
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the strcat before your breakline is the one to blame probably

You should probably null the txtt after allocating it or something to make sure strcat will not just keep appending. ie. make sure the first char is a 0-byte.

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I think the thid line in Text::operator+ ie

strcat(ttxt, this->txt);

is wrong it should be

strcpy(ttxt, this->txt);

You are currently adding to the end of a new random piece of memory instead of starting from ttxt as strcpy would do.

But a better fix in C++ is to use std::string not char* for holding strings - it does the memory allocation for you and so stops you making these sort of errors.

Also as noted in comments ttxt leaks as not deleted and you should have a operator= to deal with Text a = b;

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