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So I dont understand why the console logs 1 right away onload or something when i have one.onclick = alterIt(1) shouldn't it wait till i click one. Anyway, obviously I am not ver good at javascript, thanks for your help.

window.onload = initialize;
function initialize() {
    if (1 == 1){
        calculation();           
    }
}
function calculation() {
    var one = document.getElementById('one');
    one.onclick = alterIt(1);
}

function alterIt(x) {
    console.log(x);
}
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but currently you have it written .onload? –  Austin Aug 1 '12 at 18:40
2  
okay, yeah, of course there is a duplicate, but in my situation how am i supposed to know what to search for. –  watson Aug 1 '12 at 18:41
    
1  
@watson: See this tutorial: quirksmode.org/js/events_tradmod.html#link2 –  Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:48
2  
@JamesKingsbery: First learn JavaScript, then use jQuery after you have understood the basics. –  Bergi Aug 1 '12 at 18:49
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5 Answers 5

When you wrote:

one.onclick = alterIt(1); 

...then you invoked the alterIt function and set the return value as the onclick handler. Instead, you wanted:

one.onclick = function(){ alterIt(1) };

// ...or better yet
one.addEventListener('click',function(){ alterIt(1) },false);
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When the line one.onclick = alterIt(1); is executed, alterIt(1) is actually evaluated. What you want is to bind a function to one.onclick, which is only executed when the onclick event fires. You need something like

one.onclick = function() { alterIt(1) };

which doesn't bind the result of alterIt(1) to one.onclick, but rather the result of the function evaluation.

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sweet! thanks for the explanation. –  watson Aug 1 '12 at 18:44
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Wrap the function call like this so it doesn't fire until click:

window.onload = initialize;
function initialize() {
    if (1 == 1){
        calculation();           
    }
}
function calculation() {
    var one = document.getElementById('one');
    one.onclick = function(){ alterIt(1);};
}

function alterIt(x) {
   console.log(x);
}

Example fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/RkH6Q/

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There are two ways that you could code to work around this issue:

//Anonymous Closures
one.onclick = function(){ alterIt(1); };

//Bind Closures  
one.onclick = alertIt.bind(window, 1);

Note: Function.bind() is supported by all the browsers for a year. If you care about old browsers, anonymous closures is the way to go.

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+1 for the cool bind syntax –  Julien Ch. Aug 1 '12 at 21:11
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What is happening is that you are calling the alterIt function when you should just be passing it in. So remove the parenthesis like so:

one.onclick = alterIt;
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1  
No glory, since this does not properly preserve the parameter desired to be passed. –  Phrogz Aug 1 '12 at 18:43
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