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I'm having a C2057 error (on Visual Studio 2010) and I'm not sure why. I understand that to initialize an array on the stack, the size must be known at compile time which is why you need to use a const value (at least on Visual Studio since variable length array are not permitted like in gcc). I have a const value member in my class and I define his value in the initialization list. So technically, the value is known at compile time right? I'd like to understand why it doesn't work ? Here's a snippet:

class Dummy
{
    Dummy() : size(4096) {}

    void SomeFunction()
    {
        int array[size]; //return C2057 
        //...
    }

    const unsigned int size;
};

Thanks

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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, this const value is not a compile time constant. You would need an enum, a static integral type, or a C++11 constexpr.

Another option is to make Dummy a class template, taking a non-type parameter:

template <unsigned int SIZE>
class Dummy
{
    void SomeFunction()
    {
        int array[SIZE];
        //...
    }
};
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1  
+1 for mentionning the C++11 const expr –  Jean-Philippe Jodoin Aug 1 '12 at 19:06
    
Agreed, and another +1 for the template solution! –  Prashant Kumar Aug 1 '12 at 19:09
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size is const, but it is not known at compile-time to be 4096.

The default constructor creates a Dummy with size 4096, but who says that a Dummy class isn't constructed with a different size? If there was another constructor that allowed a different size, then the compiler could not assume that size was always 4096, so it gives the compile-time error instead.

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+1 for editing in what I was going to comment on before I could finish the comment. –  KRyan Aug 1 '12 at 18:59
    
Couldn't the compiler verify if there are other constructor with another size ? Or I guess this might be too complicated ? Because, in the example case, there is no way that the "size" value can be something else then 4096. –  Jean-Philippe Jodoin Aug 1 '12 at 19:04
2  
The compiler will not take such liberties. Instead you would need to tell the compiler using one of the methods juanchopanza listed. Then the compiler will happly accept your code and compile. It would be a bigger head-scratcher if the code compiled with one constructor, but broke with two constructors. –  Prashant Kumar Aug 1 '12 at 19:06
    
Yeah, good point. Compile error when adding a constructor would definetly be weird ! –  Jean-Philippe Jodoin Aug 1 '12 at 19:10
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Having a const data member with the same value for all objects is probably not what you want. If you want to nest a symbolic constant in a class, you have two options:

class Dummy
{
    // ...

    static const unsigned int size = 4096;
    enum { another_size = 4096 };
};
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