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Using LINQ, I have the need to query a table using my own wildcards (WHERE LIKE) and I couldn't use the normal Contains method because it kept escaping my wildcards (see my other question). I found an extension method that works flawlessly, but only on string columns:

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, string propertyName, string pattern)
{
    if (null == source) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName)) throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

    var a = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a");
    var prop = Expression.Property(a, propertyName);
    var body = Expression.Call(typeof(SqlMethods), "Like", null, prop, Expression.Constant(pattern));
    var fn = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, a);

    return source.Where(fn);
}

Here's an example of how I use the above method:

db.TABLE_NAME.WhereLike("COLUMN_NAME", "SEARCH%");

As I mentioned, this works great on a string column, but when I try to use this method on a non-string column such as an int, it blows up with the error:

No method 'Like' on type 'System.Data.Linq.SqlClient.SqlMethods' is compatible with the supplied arguments.

This is understandable because you can't perform a LIKE operation on a non-string column, you'd have to cast or convert the data to a string first. I'm not super familiar with LINQ Expressions so I'm not sure how to modify the WhereLike method above to do a cast or ToString() first. Does anybody know I would accomplish this so I can perform a wildcard search on a non-string column?

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How do you envision this working on integers, dates/times, or floating point numbers? –  user7116 Aug 1 '12 at 19:00
    
I'm not sure why this WhereLike is even necessary. In most cases on strings, when Linq converts to SQL, .Contains("text") is equivalent to LIKE '%text%', .StartsWith("text") is equivalent to LIKE text%, and .EndsWith("text") is equivalent to LIKE %text`. –  JamieSee Aug 1 '12 at 19:05
    
@sixlettervariables, consider the following SQL on an integer column: select * from [DSTYPE_FIELD_HEADINGS] WHERE CONVERT(nvarchar, [DATA_SHEET_TYPE]) LIKE '5_'. @JamieSee, I can't use those methods because the user HAS to be able to enter their own wildcards, perhaps this is a better example: db.TABLE_NAME.WhereLike("COLUMN_NAME", "TEST%TEST"); –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 19:28
    
I guess I don't understand doing string searches on integer fields (usually you do range queries). I guess all you want to do is blanket convert all columns to strings? –  user7116 Aug 1 '12 at 19:44
    
@sixlettervariables I am converting an Access app to ASP.NET so I need to retain the functionality that it has. I would never design an app that needs this functionality but unfortunately in the existing app this is possible, so I need to replicate it. 98% of the columns are strings so this isn't a problem, but there are those few that are non-string. I do need to convert all the cols to strings in LINQ but am not sure how with the extension method above. –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You'll have to change the type to string, and L2S supports Object.ToString.

In order to use this, you'll wrap the property access expression in another method call expression:

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(
    this IQueryable<T> source,
    string propertyName,
    string pattern)
{
    if (null == source)
        throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName))
        throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

    var a = Expression.Parameter(typeof(T), "a");

    // Wrap the property access in a call to property.ToString()
    var prop = Expression.Property(a, propertyName);
    var conv = Expression.Call(prop, "ToString", null);

    // Basically: SqlMethods.Like(Convert.ToString([prop]), pattern)
    var body = Expression.Call(
        typeof(SqlMethods), "Like", null,
        conv,
        Expression.Constant(pattern));

    var fn = Expression.Lambda<Func<T, bool>>(body, a);

    return source.Where(fn);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This compiles, however it throws the exception: More than one method 'ToString' on type 'System.Convert' is compatible with the supplied arguments. when I call WhereLike, even on string columns. Any ideas? –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 20:08
    
@Hoff: try it now, it switches to just calling object.ToString. –  user7116 Aug 1 '12 at 20:20
    
Works beautifully now, thank you! –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 20:22

Maybe you can change the last line to:

return source.Select(t => t.ToString()).Where(fn); 

EDIT:

Is this what you try after my comments?

public static IQueryable<T> WhereLike<T>(this IQueryable<T> source, string propertyName, string pattern)
{
  if (null == source) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(propertyName)) throw new ArgumentNullException("propertyName");

  var a = Expression.Parameter(typeof(string), "a");
  var prop = Expression.Property(a, propertyName);
  var body = Expression.Call(typeof(SqlMethods), "Like", null, prop, Expression.Constant(pattern));
  var fn = Expression.Lambda<Func<string, bool>>(body, a);

  return source.Select(t => t.ToString()).Where(fn);
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This results in 2 compilation errors: 1. 'System.Linq.IQueryable<string>' does not contain a definition for 'Where' and the best extension method overload 'System.Linq.Queryable.Where<TSource>(System.Linq.IQueryable<TSource>, System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<TSource,int,bool>>)' has some invalid arguments and Argument 2: cannot convert from 'System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<T,bool>>' to 'System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<string,int,bool>>' –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 19:33
    
@Hoff Hmm, OK. That's because after my select method, we have an IQueryable<string> instead of an IQueryable<T> like before. If you keep my Select and replace all occurrences of T in the body of your method with string, then there's a good chance it will work. (Again I haven't tested it.) But as JamieSee has mentioned in a comment to your question, maybe you don't need this WhereLike method at all. –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 1 '12 at 20:02
    
Same errors. :( –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 20:14
    
@Hoff Are you doing it like above (edited my answer)? –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Aug 1 '12 at 20:23
    
That code still fails to compile, @sixlettervariables' code did the trick though. Thank you for your help though! –  Hoff Aug 1 '12 at 20:25

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