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I have written a small Pro *C/C++ application [ multi-threaded, daemon ] where, i used Pro *c to fetch some DB records and then call C++ function to generate XML files, which are sent through socket to third party.

The problem is that, when the c++ function is called, it is generating the xml file properly, but ending up with Sig 11 error, during the transition of control from C++ back to Pro *C. Here, i dont have any return parameters as well as, all the parameters to the C++ function are constant parameters.

The problem is coming up random. In the sence, after generating couple of xml's [ which are generated from the same code ]. The error is not constant. In the sence, after generating 1 or 2 xml files, at first run, 5 xmls during second run and sometimes just after 1 xml is generated.

So, not sure, if it is related to any code problem, as it is generating the xml files, properly, but rather a stack unwinding/stack corruption problem.

Any points in this area, would of be great help.

Also, iam working on HP Itanium with aC++ compiler.

Here is the function declaration and how it is being called:

/* ------------ Pro *C : ------ */
GenerateXML(Mic_Prov_Queue_List, Prov_Service_Params_Info, iThreadId); 
/* Declaration : ----------- */
#ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { 
void GenerateXML(const Mic_Prov_List *Mic_Prov_Queue_List, const Mic_Prov_Service_Params_info_x_t * Prov_Service_Params_Info, int iThreadId); 
#ifdef __cplusplus

Regards Roopesh Majeti.

share|improve this question
    
We need to see some code - at the very least the declaration of the C++ function and how you are calling it. – anon Jul 24 '09 at 9:29
    
Here is it : ------------ Pro *C : ------ GenerateXML(Mic_Prov_Queue_List, Prov_Service_Params_Info, iThreadId); Declaration : ----------- #ifdef __cplusplus extern "C" { void GenerateXML(const Mic_Prov_List *Mic_Prov_Queue_List, const Mic_Prov_Service_Params_info_x_t * Prov_Service_Params_Info, int iThreadId); #ifdef __cplusplus } – Roopesh Majeti Jul 24 '09 at 9:36
    
Please edit the code into your question, formatting it appropriately. – anon Jul 24 '09 at 9:49
    
Sorry to ask, Can you please suggest, how to do it ? I tried to use "Inspect Element" option, but could not find the way, to do it. Sorry for bothering, if am. – Roopesh Majeti Jul 24 '09 at 9:52
1  
Hopefully without stepping on Roopesh's toes, I added it to the main body of the question. – Bernard Jul 24 '09 at 10:07

Chances are your GenerateXML function is writing beyond the bounds of a buffer and trashing the stack - specifically the return address. In this case, it's not at all surprising that the XML output looks OK but it crashes once you return.

I'm betting that among the first few variables declared in GenerateXML is a buffer or array of some sort?

EDIT:

(The OP has indicated in comments that there is indeed a char buffer of size 1000 declared in GenerateXML)

Yes, if you write more than 1000 bytes into that buffer (that is, write to position buffer[1000] or higher) then you will corrupt things - in your case, you seem to be corrupting the function return value.

To find out where your code is doing this is the hard bit. You have a few options:

  • Inspect the code by hand and try to find the spot where it's happening;
  • scatter assert(n < 1000) statements before each access to buffer[n] and use a debugger to figure out what's happened;
  • Run it under a debugger, set a watchpoint on buffer[999], then single-step after the watchpoint triggers to see when it accesses buffer[1000];
  • Run it under a code analysis tool like valgrind or Purify.
share|improve this answer
    
That is true that i have a char buffer declared and using it. But it is just of size 1000 bytes. But i bet, it should not create a crash/overwritting the stack return Address. Does it ? If so, how can we ensure, not to happen such thing. – Roopesh Majeti Jul 24 '09 at 19:49
    
If you write more than 1000 bytes into it, it sure will. You should carefully examine the code to see where you have missing bounds checks, get a co-worker to examine the code, and if all else fails run your program under an analysis tool like valgrind or Purify. – caf Jul 25 '09 at 0:49
    
Just a question. Is there any limit on the arguments [ or buffer ,rather ] that a function will have. As per your statements, you said, "if you write more than 1000 bytes into it, it sure will". Can you explain me, a little bit more or point me to any weblink which has any information for the same. Thanks in advance. Regards Roopesh M. – Roopesh Majeti Jul 25 '09 at 17:31
    
There is a limit, but unless you're working on a very constrained system (eg an embedded system) 1000 bytes should be OK. What I mean is, if your buffer is declared "char buffer[1000]", then absolutely cannot write above "buffer[999]". That is your problem. – caf Jul 26 '09 at 2:46
    
Actually, you are right that iam declaring an buffer of 1000, but using hardly 10-30 elements of it. I can share the program, if you would like to analyze it. – Roopesh Majeti Jul 26 '09 at 6:00

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