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I've got a handy collection in my middle tier which is for collections of child things that belong to a parent thing.

public class ChildCollection<TParent, TChild>
{
    public IEnumerable<TChild> GetChildren();
    etc.
}

In the interface, I've got a handy grid that can display the contents of a ChildCollection<TParent,TChild> and let users do work on it.

public abstract class ChildCollectionGrid<TCollection, TParent, TChild> : MyGridControl
    where TCollection : ChildCollection<TParent, TChild>
{
    public abstract TCollection Collection;
    etc.
}

Inheriting this class to make a grid to work with the Waffles on a Widget ends up looking like this.

public class WidgetWafflesGrid : ChildCollectionGrid<WidgetWafflesCollection, Widget, Waffle>

This is a little redundant. A WidgetWaffleCollection is a ChildCollection<Widget,Waffle>. With that first generic type argument specified, the class won't compile unless you specify exactly those two others.

Is there a prettier way to accomplish this where the compiler could infer those other two types? I know I'm being finicky but ideally I would like to have the class declaration look like:

public class WidgetWafflesGrid : ChildCollectionGrid<WidgetWafflesCollection>

Thanks for your help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No, there's not. Generic parameter inference works only on methods.

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Why derive from your collection? Just keep it like:

public abstract class ChildCollectionGrid<TParent, TChild> : MyGridControl
{
    public abstract ChildCollection<TParent, TChild> Collection;
    etc.
}

public class WidgetWafflesGrid : ChildCollectionGrid<Widget, Waffle>
{  
}
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Actually that was my original design! Obviously I've left out a lot of details, but suffice to say my concrete collection classes have lots of specific goodies and it felt less than ideal to always be casting the Collection property. –  Barry Fandango Aug 1 '12 at 23:53

The only way to handle inheritance in collections with Generics is using the Collection<TCollection,TChild> : where TCollection : Collection<TCollection,TChild> { } pattern.

Here is an example with a concrete class

public abstract class Collection<TCollection, TChild>
    where TCollection : Collection<TCollection, TChild>, new()
{
    protected Collection()
    {
        List=new List<TChild>();
    }
    protected List<TChild> List { get; set; }

    public TCollection Where(Func<TChild, bool> predicate)
    {
        var result=new TCollection();
        result.List.AddRange(List.Where(predicate));
        return result;
    }

    public void Add(TChild item) { List.Add(item); }
    public void AddRange(IEnumerable<TChild> collection) { List.AddRange(collection); }
}

public class Waffle
{
    public double Temperature { get; set; }
}

public class WafflesCollection : Collection<WafflesCollection, Waffle>
{
    public WafflesCollection BurnedWaffles
    {
        get
        {
            return Where((w) => w.Temperature>108);
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        WafflesCollection waffles=new WafflesCollection();

        // Count = 3
        waffles.Add(new Waffle() { Temperature=100 });
        waffles.Add(new Waffle() { Temperature=120 });
        waffles.Add(new Waffle() { Temperature=105 });

        var burned=waffles.BurnedWaffles;
        // Count = 1
    }
}
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