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Does Go support lambda expressions or anything similiar?

I want to port a library from another language that uses lambda expressions (Ruby).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is an example, copied and pasted carefully:

package main

import fmt "fmt"

type Stringy func() string

func foo() string{
  return "Stringy function"
}

func takesAFunction(foo Stringy){
  fmt.Printf("takesAFunction: %v\n", foo())
}

func returnsAFunction()Stringy{
  return func()string{
    fmt.Printf("Inner stringy function\n");
    return "bar" // have to return a string to be stringy
  }
}

func main(){
  takesAFunction(foo);
  var f Stringy = returnsAFunction();
  f();
  var baz Stringy = func()string{
    return "anonymous stringy\n"
  };
  fmt.Printf(baz());
}
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why did you say that? copied and pasted carefully? :) –  loyalflow Aug 1 '12 at 19:53
    
because I copied the code, and wanted to make it clear :) –  perreal Aug 1 '12 at 19:55
1  
I’d love to see more on your question than copied code. First and foremost, you could add a "yes"/"no"/"partly" etc. Then a bit of description, what your code actually does. –  Kissaki Aug 2 '12 at 8:55
    
Kissaki basically he is passing functions to other functions and returning functions from functions, the code is self descriptive and th names are clever, takesaFunction receive a function than return string, returnsAFunction return a function than return a string.....so..yes...go support lambdas perfectly :D .... –  CocoOS Dec 9 '12 at 4:32

Lambda expressions are also called function literals. Go supports them completely.

See the language spec: http://golang.org/ref/spec#Function_literals

See a code-walk, with examples and a description: http://golang.org/doc/codewalk/functions/

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