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I'm not able to find an effective way to pick out all permutations of 4 elements from a list of 9 elements in Haskell. The python-way to do the same thing:

itertools.permutations(range(9+1),4)

An not so effective way to do it in Haskell:

nub . (map (take 4)) . permutations $ [1..9]

I would like to find something like:

permutations 4 [1..9]
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1  
here is a similar SO question which can address this problem: stackoverflow.com/questions/9831374/… –  user5402 Aug 1 '12 at 20:06
    
@user5402 sorry I'm not that hax at Haskell (yet), I can't really see the resemblance. –  SlimJim Aug 2 '12 at 7:16
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4 Answers

Here is my solution:

import Control.Arrow

select :: [a] -> [(a, [a])]
select [] = []
select (x:xs) = (x, xs) : map (second (x:)) (select xs)

perms :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
perms 0 _  = [[]]
perms n xs = do
    (y, ys) <- select xs
    fmap (y:) (perms (n - 1) ys)

It's very lazy and even works for infinite lists, although the output there is not very useful. I didn't bother implementing diagonalization or something like that. For finite lists it's fine.

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Without using Control.Arrow, select can be written as: select (x:xs) = (x,xs) : [ (y,x:ys) | (y,ys) <- select xs ], with the additional base case: select [x] = [(x,[])]. –  lbolla Aug 1 '12 at 21:05
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@Ibolla: your "additional base case" is already covered by select [] = [] –  newacct Aug 2 '12 at 0:31
    
@newacct: no, my additional base case is select [x], not select []. –  lbolla Aug 2 '12 at 10:46
    
@Ibolla: but select [x] is select (x:[]), which by your recursive case becomes select (x:[]) = (x,[]) : [(y,x:ys) | (y,ys) <- select []]. Since we already have select [] = [], that list comprehension becomes [], so we get (x,[]) : [], which is the same as [(x,[])] –  newacct Aug 2 '12 at 18:21
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pick :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
pick 0 _ = [[]]
pick _ [] = []
pick n (x : xs) = map (x :) (pick (n - 1) xs) ++ pick n xs

perms :: Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
perms n l = pick n l >>= permutations
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replicateM 4 [1..9]

Will do this for you, I believe. It's in Control.Monad.

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replicateM doesn't produce lists of distinct elements, though –  user5402 Aug 1 '12 at 21:52
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How about this

import Data.List (delete)

perms :: (Eq a) => Int -> [a] -> [[a]]
perms 0 _  = [[]]
perms _ [] = [[]]
perms n xs = [ (x:ys) | x <- xs, ys <- perms (n-1) (delete x xs) ]

Basically, it says, a permutation of n elements from a set is, pick any element as the first element of the result, then the rest is a permutation of n-1 elements from the rest of the set. Plus some base cases. Assumes that elements in the list are unique.

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But that's slower than ertes' solution, and the Eq constraint isn't really nice. –  leftaroundabout Aug 2 '12 at 0:09
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