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I am using a Queue (C#) to store data that has to be sent to any client connecting.

my lock statement is private readonly:

private readonly object completedATEQueueSynched = new object();

only two methods are enqueueing:

1) started by mouse-movement, executed by the mainform-thread:

public void handleEddingToolMouseMove(MouseEventArgs e)
{
    AbstractTrafficElement de = new...
    sendElementToAllPlayers(de)
    lock (completedATEQueueSynched)
    {
       completedATEQueue.Enqueue(de);
    }
}

2) started on a button-event, executed by mainform-thread too (does not matter here, but better safe than sorry):

public void handleBLC(EventArgs e)
{
    AbstractTrafficElement de = new...
    sendElementToAllPlayers(de);
    lock (completedATEQueueSynched)
    {
         completedATEQueue.Enqueue(de);
    }
}

this method is called by the thread responsible for the specific client connected. here it is:

private void sendSetData(TcpClient c)
{
    NetworkStream clientStream = c.GetStream();
    lock (completedATEQueueSynched)
    {
        foreach (AbstractTrafficElement ate in MainForm.completedATEQueue)
        {
            binaryF.Serialize(clientStream, ate);
        }
    }
}

if a client connects and i am moving my mouse at the same time, a deadlock occurs. if i lock the iteration only, a InvalidOperation exection is thrown, because the queue changed.

i have tried the synchronized Queue-Wrapper as well, but it does't work for Iterating. (even in combination with locks) any ideas? i just don't get my mistake

share|improve this question
    
wonder if msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd267265.aspx this will wrk ? –  adt Aug 1 '12 at 21:32
    
Where exactly are you deadlocking? Without knowing who calls what in the overall picture it's hard to suggest what the synchronization issue is. Is the last part run when a new client connects? Remember also that raising an event from inside a lock is a bad idea - events are synchronous (by default), so you could raise something that calls some code outside the lock in another thread via an event handler, that then tries to re-enter your lock meaning your event call can never complete - deadlock! –  dash Aug 1 '12 at 21:41
1  
I don't think you're actually deadlocking, just blocking (too) long. –  Henk Holterman Aug 1 '12 at 21:54
1  
But what if (a future version of) Queue<> does a lock(this) ? It's a mostly theoretical argument but you want to lock on something only your code has access to. private is not enough. –  Henk Holterman Aug 1 '12 at 22:12
2  
Iirc foreach doesn't actually dequeue; did you intend to dequeue? (you usually do, with a queue) –  Marc Gravell Aug 1 '12 at 22:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like ConcurrentQueue you've wanted

UPDATE

Yes work fine, TryDequeue uses within the Interlocked.CompareExchange and SpinWait. Lock is not good choice, because too expensive take a look on SpinLock and don't forget about Data Structures for Parallel Programming

Her is enqueue from ConcurrentQueue, as you see only SpinWait and Interlocked.Increment are used. looks pretty nice

public void Enqueue(T item)
{
  SpinWait spinWait = new SpinWait();
  while (!this.m_tail.TryAppend(item, ref this.m_tail))
    spinWait.SpinOnce();
}

  internal void Grow(ref ConcurrentQueue<T>.Segment tail)
  {
    this.m_next = new ConcurrentQueue<T>.Segment(this.m_index + 1L);
    tail = this.m_next;
  }

  internal bool TryAppend(T value, ref ConcurrentQueue<T>.Segment tail)
  {
    if (this.m_high >= 31)
      return false;
    int index = 32;
    try
    {
    }
    finally
    {
      index = Interlocked.Increment(ref this.m_high);
      if (index <= 31)
      {
        this.m_array[index] = value;
        this.m_state[index] = 1;
      }
      if (index == 31)
        this.Grow(ref tail);
    }
    return index <= 31;
  }
share|improve this answer
1  
does the de-queueing work fine with that? and as im using a list to organize my connected clients, it would be better if i knew what i am doing wrong with my locks –  Benni Aug 1 '12 at 21:40
1  
Yes work fine, TryDequeue uses within the Interlocked.CompareExchange and SpinWait. –  GSerjo Aug 1 '12 at 21:52
1  
GSerjo, your advice is very good, although acquiring a Lock per se is not a very expensive operation. The problem is addressed in the suggestion given by @HenkHolterman: the lock is being held during a potentially slow operation (the network serialization). Rewriting the code as Henk suggests will reduce contention for the queue and will probably give the expected results. :) –  user1222021 Aug 1 '12 at 22:14
    
one last question: what happens with a ConcuQueue when i enqueue while iterating? –  Benni Aug 2 '12 at 13:07
    
I've updated answer, added code from ConcurrentQueue –  GSerjo Aug 2 '12 at 14:42

You can reduce the contention, probably enough to make it acceptable:

private void sendSetData(TcpClient c)
{
    IEnumerable<AbstractTrafficElement> list;

    lock (completedATEQueueSynched)
    {
        list = MainForm.completedATEQueue.ToList();  // take a snapshot
    }

    NetworkStream clientStream = c.GetStream();
    foreach (AbstractTrafficElement ate in list)
    {
       binaryF.Serialize(clientStream, ate);
    }    
}

But of course a snapshot introduces its own bit of timing logic. What exactly does 'all elements' mean at any given moment?

share|improve this answer
    
Good suggestion! You just need to be aware that more elements could be enqueued while the network transmission is taking place, it's hard to say with the code given, but that might need to be addressed =) –  user1222021 Aug 1 '12 at 22:18
    
@sgorozco - that is what i am hinting at in the last paragraph. –  Henk Holterman Aug 1 '12 at 22:19
    
Ohhh, I didn' read that, sorry! =D –  user1222021 Aug 1 '12 at 22:20

Henk Holterman's approach is good if your rate of en-queue, dequeue on queue is not very high. Here I think you are capturing mouse movements. If you expect to generate lot of data in queue the above approach is not fine. The lock becomes contention between the network code and en-queue code. The granularity of this lock is at whole queue level.

In this case I'll recommend what GSerjo mentioned - ConcurrentQueue. I've looked into the implementation of this queue. It is very granular. It operates at single element level in queue. While one thread is dequeueing, other threads can in parallel enqueue without stopping.

share|improve this answer
    
It seems to be only about Enqueue and GetEnumerator, that implies the rate of adding can't be very high. –  Henk Holterman Aug 2 '12 at 13:41
    
@HenkHolterman I didn't get ur comment. With "rate of adding" I mean how many times the caller calls Enqueue per second. If that is high, your system's thread contention rate will go up. –  Ankush Aug 2 '12 at 14:15

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