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I am building a builder based on Joshua's builder pattern. my question is how can I make it singleton? to elaborate my point, if I have the below builder

public class Widget {
    public static class Builder {
        private String name;

        public Builder( String name) {
            this.name = name;
        }

        public Widget build() {
            Widget result = new Widget(this);
            return result;
        }
        public Builder model( String value ) {
            this.model = value;
            return this;
        }
    }

    private final String name;

    private Widget( Builder b ) {
        this.name = b.name;
    }

    // ... etc. ...
}

I would call this builder from another class like new Widget.Builder().name("abc").build()........

but what if I want only one instance of this Widget or I have a need to access this Widget from multiple places without resorting to creating a new one every time. Ideally I would like to confine the instantiation with in the Widget class. Any thoughts?

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4 Answers 4

If you really need a Singleton, Joshua also has advice on the best way to make a singleton in modern Java.

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If you need to do this, and want to avoid polluting your builder pattern then add a singleton to hold a centralized instance of the builder.

public enum CentralWidgitBuilder{
  INSTANCE; //Effective Java singleton technique

  private final Widget.Builder mBuilder = new Widget.Builder();

  public Widget.Builder getBuilder(){
    return mBuilder;
  }
}

Then to reference from anywhere:

CentralWidgitBuilder.INSTANCE.getBuilder().
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If there is only one builder object so you can use singleton pattern like this:

public class Widget {
public static class Builder {
    private static Builder builder;
    private String name;

    public Builder getInstance(String name){
       if (instance==null){
         instance=new Builder(name);
       }
       return instance;
    }

    private Builder( String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public Widget build() {
        Widget result = new Widget(this);
        return result;
    }
    public Builder model( String value ) {
        this.model = value;
        return this;
    }
}

private final String name;

private Widget( Builder b ) {
    this.name = b.name;
}

// ... etc. ...
}

If you have multiple builders you may need a static Map in this class

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yeah makes sense. thanks a lot but what If I want Widget to be singleton? –  Java Aug 1 '12 at 22:05
    
Then put the static instance to the widget class and pass the a builder to the getinstance method –  Masood_mj Aug 1 '12 at 22:33

IMHO, Singleton and Builder Patterns don't seem to go together: why would you need a builder if there is only one instance to build?

If what you need is to reuse a Builder object because you want to build a similar object several times, you can simply keep a reference to that Builder and use it as many times as you want (since you made it static):

Widget.Builder builder = new Widget.Builder("abc").model("def");

Then you can create several Widgets:

Widget w1 = builder.build();
Widget w2 = builder.build();
...
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1  
The reason I opted for builder was because this object has like 20 fields to set and instead of passing them all in constructor I prefer the builder way and the reason I need singleton is because these fields are config data that doesn't change very often. –  Java Aug 1 '12 at 21:43
    
@Java If you really need a singleton and I mean that you really need one, then this would not apply. –  assylias Aug 1 '12 at 21:49
    
@Java you have edited your question to clarify that you want a Widget singleton. That seems to confirm that it may not be the best way going forward. You might want to read this post about configurable singletons. –  assylias Aug 1 '12 at 22:28
    
Thanks I will read the post. –  Java Aug 1 '12 at 22:31

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