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Before you try to answer this with, "Do a quick Google search." I'd like to point out that I have already. Here is the situation, I have the following method that attempts to modify a registry key value. The problem I'm getting is that when executed, it throws an UnauthorizedAccessException even though I've opened the key as writeable. I'm running Visual Studio as administrator and even tried to make a small .exe with a manifest file forcing it to run as admin that will execute the code with no luck. The key already exists, it doesn't try to go into the CreateKey method. Here is the block of code.

Path = "S-1-5-21-1644491937-1078145449-682003330-5490\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System"
Key = "DisableTaskMgr"
NewValue = 1

public OperationResult ModifyKey()
    {
        OperationResult result = new OperationResult();

        if (!Path.IsNullOrEmptyTrim())
        {
            if (!Key.IsNullOrEmptyTrim())
            {
                try
                {
                    var key = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, true);

                    if (key != null)
                    {
                        key.SetValue(Key, NewValue);

                        key.Close();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        result = CreateKey();
                    }
                }
                catch (Exception ex)
                {
                    result.SetFail("Error accessing registry", ex);
                }
            }
            else
            {
                result.SetFail("Registry key was null");
            }
        }
        else
        {
            result.SetFail("Registry path was null");
        }

        return result;
    }

Do I have to manually walk down the registry tree setting each OpenSubKey call to writeable? I tried this as well, still threw the same error...

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1  
Please confirm that you can modify the key in question running regular regedit. –  Alexei Levenkov Aug 1 '12 at 22:00
    
Yes, I can modify the key at will using regedit. I do have admin rights and like I said in my post, I've tried creating a simple .exe with a manifest to force running as administrator. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:10
    
You may also want to test under this with different user account or on another machine. –  Chris Walter Aug 1 '12 at 22:12
    
I did attempt to test this code on my Windows XP virtual machine as well, same issue. On the XP box, the User ID was obviously different, it pulls the user ID of the currently logged in user. I've also tried modifying the HKEY_CURRENT_USER key in the same spot thinking that it could be an issue with the User, same error. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:15
    
I tried a simplified version of this code on my Windows 7 machine (I didn't have the System\DisableTaskMgr key-value so I had to create it), and it worked... –  Eric Aug 1 '12 at 22:21
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4 Answers

in the var for your key

var key = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, true);

change to

var key = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, RegistryKeyPermissionCheck.ReadWriteSubTree);  
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I actually did try that as well, it gave me the same error, so I reverted my code. Thanks for the suggestion though. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:22
    
The exception is thrown at SetValue. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:53
    
Have you tried that code on another key? Also why the use of an implicit variable with var, why not use RegistryKey –  Sorceri Aug 1 '12 at 23:17
    
There is no particular reason for the var rather than naming it explicitly. As for the code on another key, see my response to your post here: link –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 23:35
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One possible issue that I see with your code is that the Path variable is being set to a string that doesn't escape the \ characters. How about something like:

Path = @"S-1-5-21-1644491937-1078145449-682003330-5490\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\System";
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The Path that I posted is actually a property on the class, the string is properly escaped when it's set. I just quickly pasted the value for reference on what I'm attempting to access. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:08
1  
@Middas, have you tried using CreateSubKey rather than OpenSubKey? It opens it for writing if it exists, and creates it otherwise. –  Eric Aug 1 '12 at 22:27
    
@Middas, can you try breaking on the SetValue line, and verify the exact value of key.Name and the exact value of Key at that line? –  Eric Aug 1 '12 at 22:30
1  
Have you tried to access another key using the code? –  Sorceri Aug 1 '12 at 23:11
1  
at this point I would check the access rights to the key. I know you stated you can edit the key with regedit but what is being returned when you access it through code. using System.Security.AccessControl; RegistryKey key= Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, RegistryKeyPermissionCheck.ReadWriteSubTree); RegistrySecurity regSec = key.GetAccessControl(); then just check to see what the access is..... –  Sorceri Aug 1 '12 at 23:40
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Have you tried setting the accessrule and permissions? (I haven't been able to test this code yet.)

 string user = Environment.UserDomainName + "\\" + Environment.UserName
        RegistryAccessRule rule = new RegistryAccessRule(user,
        RegistryRights.FullControl,
        AccessControlType.Allow);        
        RegistrySecurity security = new RegistrySecurity();
        security.AddAccessRule(rule);
        var key = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, RegistryKeyPermissionCheck.ReadWriteSubTree, RegistryRights.FullControl);
        key.SetAccessControl(security);
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't see an overload for OpenSubKey that accepts RegistrySecurity, I did try this though: var key = Microsoft.Win32.Registry.Users.OpenSubKey(Path, RegistryKeyPermissionCheck.ReadWriteSubTree, RegistryRights.FullControl); same error. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:40
    
Ah, you're correct, I've edited my answer, but I don't know if it will do anything. –  0_______0 Aug 1 '12 at 22:52
    
Nope, still gave the same error. Thanks for trying though. –  Middas Aug 1 '12 at 22:54
2  
Sorry, I can't replicate it, maybe try disabling your antivirus software; I've seen problems where the AV will prevent access without any pop-ups. It could block you from modifying certain keys. That's the only thing I can think of, AV stopping it. –  0_______0 Aug 1 '12 at 23:17
1  
Yep - AV, where I work the support guys have this rule... it goes ' Always check McAfee FIRST'! The number of times people have spent hours looking into something and dismissed the AV because it didn't seem like it could be the issue..! –  Charleh Aug 2 '12 at 16:27
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

As a last ditch effort to figure out what was going on, I created a simple service to test this code that will run as the local system account. It's the highest privileges I could think of to try and run the code with. Running the code with these permissions worked.

Special thanks go out to 0_____0 and Charleh for pointing out the anti-virus as well. I checked the logs and it turns out it was trying to quarantine my changes. I guess even it won't stop the System user from making these changes though.

Special thanks go out to Sorceri as well for helping me research this so much.

In conclusion, if you're having intermittent, extremely odd behavior, check your virus scanner and permissions.

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