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I'm trying to create a custom jquery cycle plugin which basically displays the contents of an <li> element upon click. The html is as follows:-

<ul class="ticker">
    <li>Boo1</li>
    <li>More boo1</li>
    <li>Even more boo</li>

    <a class="prev" href="#">previous</a>
    <a class="next" href="#">next</a>
</ul>​

so when the user clicks the next button, the next <li> shows and when he clicks the prev button, the previous <li> shows.

Achieving this has never been easy :( I'm still quite new to jquery so please pardon. Any help guys

share|improve this question
    
For those who will be tackling this question, here is the JSFiddle to play with (jsfiddle.net/9cYJr) .. Fork on ! –  Ashutosh Jindal Aug 1 '12 at 22:20
3  
you included the previous and next BUTTONS in the cycle!! –  Santy Aug 1 '12 at 22:23
    
okay, so I'm having a little trouble understanding what you're trying to do here (please review your post for grammar), but if I understand you correctly you have a function that cycles through a set of elements on a timer and you want to add a click event to cause the next element to appear early, on demand. Correct? –  Zachary Kniebel Aug 1 '12 at 22:31
    
I don't understand what you actually want. Do you want it to go forward one or back one when you click the links? Or, do you want it to slide in one direction or the other, depending on which link? –  PaparazzoKid Aug 1 '12 at 22:32
1  
@PaparazzoKid: the guy who wrote the fiddle isn't the same as the guy who asked the question –  Zachary Kniebel Aug 1 '12 at 22:38

5 Answers 5

I think this will solve your problem, you can see it working here http://jsfiddle.net/KvscH/

<ul class="ticker">
    <li>Boo1</li>
    <li>More boo1</li>
    <li>Even more boo</li>
</ul>

<a class="prev" href="#">previous</a> -
<a class="next" href="#">next</a>

Js:

var ticker = $('ul.ticker');
ticker.children(':first').show().siblings().hide();

setInterval(function() {
    ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
        $(this).appendTo(ticker);
        ticker.children(':first').show();
    });
},50000); 

$('.next').live ('click', function () {
    ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
        $(this).appendTo(ticker);
        ticker.children(':first').show();
    });
});

$('.prev').live ('click', function () {
    ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
        ticker.find('li:last').insertBefore(ticker.find('li:first'));
        ticker.children(':first').show();
    });
});

share|improve this answer
    
It is a solution, but much more complex than it needs to be. Regardless, you made the effort and it works so I'll vote it up - it can be his job to clean it up ;) –  Zachary Kniebel Aug 1 '12 at 22:44
    
I used the code he sent (and removed) :) –  guiligan Aug 1 '12 at 22:46
    
@guiligan hahaha –  Santy Aug 1 '12 at 22:51
    
@guiligan nice attempt though but the first block of code was needless:- jsfiddle.net/KvscH/1 –  Santy Aug 1 '12 at 22:58
    
@Santy, the user had posted before that it should go to the next after a couple of seconds. He edited the post after I made the above script :) –  guiligan Aug 2 '12 at 0:06

Taking a wild stab in the dark:

DEMONSTRATION (I left previous button untouched, that's up to you)

The code (notice I left a section for you to complete):

var ticker = $('ul.ticker');
ticker.children(':first').show().siblings().hide();
startTicker();

$('.prev, .next').bind('click', function() {
    if($(this).attr('class') == 'prev') {
        clearInterval(myInterval);
        /// for previous
        /// do it
        /// yourself
    } else {
        clearInterval(myInterval);
        ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
            $(this).appendTo(ticker);
            ticker.children(':first').show();
            startTicker();
        });
    }
});

var myInterval;
function startTicker() {
    myInterval = setInterval(function() {
        ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
            $(this).appendTo(ticker);
            ticker.children(':first').show();
        });
    },2000);
}
share|improve this answer

Okay, here is a potential solution for you, if I am understanding you correctly:

First off, setInterval is a "background function", in that it can run in the background while you run other functions. What you want to do first is move the stuff that you do inside of the setInterval method into its own function. Then, you will create a click event handler in which you call the that function. After that you can call setInterval and and it will run at the same time as you have your click-event listener running.

If you experience any issues with the interval being broken when your click-listener fires, you can also re-initialize your interval after calling the function in your click-listener.

Let me know if you need any further help/explanation.

 

Good Luck! :)

share|improve this answer

Take a look at this jsFiddle

HTML

<ul class="ticker">
    <li>Boo1</li>
    <li>More boo1</li>
    <li>Even more boo</li>

</ul>
<a class="prev" href="#">previous</a>
<a class="next" href="#">next</a>
​

JS

var ticker = $('ul.ticker');
ticker.children(':first').show().siblings().hide();

function cycleFunc(direction) {
    ticker.find(':visible').fadeOut(function() {
        (direction == 'forward') ? $(this).appendTo(ticker) : $(this).prependTo(ticker);
        ticker.children((direction == 'forward') ? ':first' : ':last').show();
    })
}

var timer = setInterval(function() {
    cycleFunc('forward');
}, 2000);

$('.next, .prev').click(function() {
    clearInterval(timer)
    var direction = ($(this).hasClass('next')) ? 'forward' : 'backward';
    timer = setInterval(function() {
        cycleFunc(direction);
    }, 2000)
});​
share|improve this answer

Removed the DOM manipulations just to keep track of the currently visible element.

I think they are unnecessary. My 2 cents.

Also made it like something someone would actually use.

HTML:

<div id='Test'>
    <ul class="ticker">
        <li>Boo1</li>
        <li>More boo1</li>
        <li>Even more boo</li>
    </ul>
    <a class="prev" href="#">previous</a>
    <a class="next" href="#">next</a>
</div>

JS:

jQuery.fn.Custom_cycler = function(Options){
    var Options = jQuery.extend({'Next': 'a.next', 'Previous': 'a.prev', 'List': 'ul.ticker'},Options||{});
    var List = jQuery(Options.List, this);
    var Index = 0;
    var Size = List.children().size();

    List.children().hide().first().show();

    var Move = function(Event){
        Event.preventDefault();
        if(Event.data)
        {
            Index++;
        }
        else
        {
            Index--;
        }

        Index=(Index+Size)%Size;

        jQuery(List.children().hide().get(Index)).show();

    };

    jQuery(Options.Next, this).bind('click', true, Move);

    jQuery(Options.Previous, this).bind('click', false, Move);

    return(this);
};

You use it like this:

jQuery('div#Test').Custom_cycler();

EDIT: Used the data parameter in the event handler to use only one function for both events which allowed me to use a closure for the Index/Size instead of jQuery(...).data.

Also removed some unnecessary variables from the closure.

And finally narrowed the context of the selection to avoid mistakenly manipulating external DOM tags when calling the function. It also executes faster because jQuery doesn't have to lookup the entire DOM.

Could be optimized further by calling hide() only on the previously shown element instead of all of them (easily infer-able from the value of Index).

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