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I've got a Windows Form with a button and a datagridview. The project includes a working database connection and LINQ to SQL class. I'm trying to bind the datagridview to the LINQ to SQL.

In a code module I've got this:

Public Function DataGridList() As BindingSource
    Dim NewBindingSource As New BindingSource()
    Dim db As New DataClasses1DataContext()
    NewBindingSource.DataSource = _
    From Block In db.BLOCK_ASSIGNMENTs
        Where Block.gr912_school = "Franklin"
    Select Block.gr6_school Distinct
    Return NewBindingSource
End Function

And this button_click code in the form:

Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
    DataGridView1.DataSource = DataGridList()
End Sub

When I click the button I get the length of the school names in the datagridview, with a column header of "length."

results

If I just run this very similar code in the button_click instead, the school names appear correctly in the immediate window:

Private Sub Button1_Click(sender As System.Object, e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click
    Dim db As New DataClasses1DataContext()
    Dim TestQuery =
    From Block In db.BLOCK_ASSIGNMENTs
        Where Block.gr912_school = "Franklin"
    Select Block.gr6_school Distinct
    For Each block In TestQuery
        Debug.Print(block)
    Next

End Sub
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Give this a try:

Public Function DataGridList() As BindingSource
    Dim NewBindingSource As New BindingSource()
    Dim db As New DataClasses1DataContext()
    NewBindingSource.DataSource = _
    From Block In db.BLOCK_ASSIGNMENTs
        Where Block.gr912_school = "Franklin"
    Select New With { Key .Value = Block.gr6_school } Distinct
    Return NewBindingSource
End Function

This should give it a property that the DataGridView can pick up on. The New With... creates an anonymous object with a Property named Value. The DataGridView works on this type of object by enumerating the public properties and rendering them as columns. If you had needed more than one value, you could have added additional items inside the curly braces in the same way separated by commas. See Anonymous Types (Visual Basic) for more information.

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Yes! Thanks. That works faster than my solution below and also works with my attempt to replicate an IN clause in the SQL using Contains. I had looked at the "New With" construct but couldn't hack anything together. Can you spare a few words on what it's doing? –  Doug Glancy Aug 2 '12 at 18:11
    
Certainly. I've added some explanation for you. –  JamieSee Aug 3 '12 at 15:41
    
Thanks for the explanation. I actually did need more columns, and I was afraid it would be tricky. But, as you say, I just added the other five fields in there and it worked great. I like this LINQ to SQL stuff, but there does seem to be many ways to do any given task. Thanks for showning me a good one! –  Doug Glancy Aug 3 '12 at 16:11

You might try adding a .ToString to the Select:

   From Block In db.BLOCK_ASSIGNMENTs
        Where Block.gr912_school = "Franklin"
   Select Block.gr6_school.ToString Distinct

I believe that Debug.Print does an implicit conversion to .ToString when it prints to the immediate window. However, a datagrid cell treats everything as an object and displays the default property for that object.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your idea. That won't compile - it error as "Range variable name cannot match the name of a member of the 'Object' class". I tried casting and ToStringing in a couple other places but get an empty datagridview. I added a ListBox and set it's DataSource the same way and it populates correctly. When I set a breakpoint and examine the DataGridView1.DataSource's List it shows the correct members - 8 nice strings with school names. –  Doug Glancy Aug 2 '12 at 16:08
    
@DougGlancy, For the heck of it, try CStr() instead of .ToString –  Holger Brandt Aug 2 '12 at 16:18
    
I did try that (what I meant by "casting and ToStringing" :) ). I've found an explanation and solution, I think: psworld.pl/Programming/BindingListOfString. Just need to figure how to turn the feed the LINQ SQL query to a DataTable, which can then be the source of the DataGridView. –  Doug Glancy Aug 2 '12 at 16:38

Turns out, of course, this has been addressed often, including on SO, and here. The route I chose was to use an intermediate DataTable:

Public Function DataGridList() As DataTable
    Dim NewDataTable As New DataTable
    Dim db As New DataClasses1DataContext()
    Dim i As Int32

    Dim qry =
    From Block In db.BLOCK_ASSIGNMENTs.AsEnumerable
        Where Block.gr912_school = "Franklin"
    Select Block.gr6_school Distinct

    NewDataTable.Columns.Add("School")
    For i = 0 To qry.Count - 1
        NewDataTable.Rows.Add(qry(i))
    Next
    Return NewDataTable
End Function

This seems pretty slow the first time it runs, so I may try something else in the future, but it allows me to feed the grid via LINQ, which is what I want to work with.

(I would like to use the qry's CopyToDataTable property, but it's only available if the query returns a DataTableRows collection, or some such, and my hacking around didn't reveal how to do that.)

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