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First, I would like to say that the use of this is only for learning, and probably won't be used in a functional application.

I have created a class (named DateHandler) that receives a Date object (custom), and it has a function that receives a string, changing each character to it's match.

For example:

"d/m/Y" can return "1/1/2005"

d => Day
m => Month
Y => Full Year

Note that characters that aren't predefined won't be changed.

The Date class:

class Date
{
    #region Properties

    private int _Day;
    private int _Month;

    public int Day
    {
        get
        {
            return _Day;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value < 1)
                throw new Exception("Cannot set property Date.Day below 1");
            this._Day = value;
        }
    }
    public int Month
    {
        get
        {
            return _Month;
        }
        set
        {
            if (value < 1)
                throw new Exception("Cannot set property Date.Month below 1");
            this._Month = value;
        }
    }
    public int Year;

    #endregion

    #region Ctors

    public Date() { }
    public Date(int Day, int Month, int Year)
    {
        this.Day = Day;
        this.Month = Month;
        this.Year = Year;
    }

    #endregion
}

The DateHandler Class:

class DateHandler
{
    #region Properties

    private Date Date;
    private Dictionary<char, string> Properties;
    private int Properties_Count;

    #endregion

    #region Ctors

    public DateHandler()
    {
        Properties = new Dictionary<char, string>();
    }

    public DateHandler(Date Date)
        : this()
    {
        this.SetDate(Date);
    }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    public void SetDate(Date Date)
    {
        this.Date = Date;
        this.SetProperties();
    }

    private void SetProperties()
    {
        this.Properties.Add('d', this.Date.Day + "");
        this.Properties.Add('m', this.Date.Month + "");
        this.Properties.Add('Y', this.Date.Year + "");
        this.Properties.Add('y', this.Date.Year.ToString().Substring(Math.Max(0, this.Date.Year.ToString().Length - 2)));
        this.Properties_Count = Properties.Count;
    }

    public string Format(string FormatString)
    {
        int len = FormatString.Length;
        if (Properties.ContainsKey(FormatString[0]))
        {
            FormatString = FormatString.Replace(FormatString[0] + "", this.Properties[FormatString[0]] + "");
        }
        for (int i = 1; i < len; i++)
        {
            if (this.Properties.ContainsKey(FormatString[i]) && FormatString[i - 1] != '\\')
            {
                FormatString = FormatString.Replace(FormatString[i] + "", this.Properties[FormatString[i]] + "");
            }
        }
        return FormatString;
    }

    #endregion
}

My problem: I have to define a new dictionary to each new DateHandler, and I'm trying to think of a creative way, that there will be only one dictionary that will point to it's match definition. Any ideas how?

My main goal: One instance of the dictionary Properties, which will be used as a referenced to values from multiple instances of DateHandler.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Just to clarify, you are trying to have one instance of a Dictionary (eg, the 'Properties' Dictionary) with all your entries (eg 'd', this.Date.Day + "") that multiple instances of 'DateHandler' will reference? Please let me know if I am way off :) –  Layoric Aug 2 '12 at 2:29
1  
Is there a specific reason you're not just storing a DateTime and using the built in string formatting functions that already exist in the .NET framework? –  Michael Perrenoud Aug 2 '12 at 2:35
    
@Layoric Exactly. –  Tyymo Aug 2 '12 at 2:38
    
@Mike My first two sentences explains that. –  Tyymo Aug 2 '12 at 2:38
    
@GuyDavid OK - thank you. May I ask what exactly you're trying to learn? Are you trying to understand how string.Format() works? Are you trying to delve into the depths of advanced string manipulation? I'm only asking because those topics probably go a lot deeper than you really want to go. –  Michael Perrenoud Aug 2 '12 at 2:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think what you have is not unreasonable, but as always there are multiple ways of doing things. My personal preference would be to use the 'DateHandler' as a static class as a helper (since this does very little and is quite simple).

static class DateHandler 
{     
    #region Properties      
    private static Date Date;
    private static Dictionary<char, string> properties;
    private static Dictionary<char, string> Properties 
    {
        get
        {
            if (properties == null)
            {
                properties = new Dictionary<char, string>();
                SetProperties();
            }
            return properties;
        }
        set
        {
            properties = value;
        }
    }
    private static int Properties_Count;      
    #endregion      

    #region Methods      

    private static void SetProperties()     
    {         
        Properties.Add('d', Date.Day + "");         
        Properties.Add('m', Date.Month + "");         
        Properties.Add('Y', Date.Year + "");         
        Properties.Add('y', Date.Year.ToString().Substring(Math.Max(0, Date.Year.ToString().Length - 2)));         
        Properties_Count = Properties.Count;     
    }
    public static string Format(Date date, string FormatString)     
    {
        Date = date;
        int len = FormatString.Length;         
        if (Properties.ContainsKey(FormatString[0]))         
        {             
            FormatString = FormatString.Replace(FormatString[0] + "", Properties[FormatString[0]] + "");         
        }         
        for (int i = 1; i < len; i++)         
        {             
            if (Properties.ContainsKey(FormatString[i]) && FormatString[i - 1] != '\\')             
            {                 
                FormatString = FormatString.Replace(FormatString[i] + "", Properties[FormatString[i]] + "");             
            }         
        }         
        return FormatString;     
    }      
    #endregion 
} 

This will avoid instantiating the dictionary every time you create a DateHandler. Your use will look like this.

 Date d = new Date(1, 1, 2012);

 string result = DateHandler.Format(d, "d/m/Y");

This has it's own draw backs and some times it's good to avoid 'helper classes', but hope it helps as food for thought.

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