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I am trying to debug a kernel code, because of a "scheduling while in atomic" that is crashing my system. In some point of an actual kernel module I added a line for calling a function defined in another kernel module (this one made by me). The call is:

mycallback(svc, skb);

And mycallback() function returns int. So I have 2 questions:

  1. Is it safe to call a non-void function inside the kernel without asigning its result to a variable?

  2. If the code where mycallback() is called would be spin_locked or something like that, would it be safe? Would it be spin_locked/atomic or I might sleep and compromise the kernel?

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Ignoring a return value doesn't change the calling convention .. however, it might be an important value. In any case, please focus on one question at a time. (Question #2 seems [more] interesting.) –  user166390 Aug 2 '12 at 2:58
    
@pst Thanks, I was almost completely sure about Question #1. I am concerned on Question #2, any help with it? –  jeanc Aug 2 '12 at 3:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Is it safe to call a non-void function inside the kernel without asigning its result to a variable?

Yes.

If the code where mycallback() is called would be spin_locked or something like that, would it be safe? Would it be spin_locked/atomic or I might sleep and compromise the kernel?

If the code that calls mycallback() can hold a spinlock, mycallback() must not call any functions that can sleep. If you do try to sleep while holding a spinlock, you will see the "Scheduling while atomic" crash that you've described.

Potentially sleeping functions include copy_to_user(), copy_from_user(), kmalloc() (without the GFP_ATOMIC flag), mutex_lock() and a lot more beside.

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Thank you very much, this helps me a lot to clarify ideas. How could I know what functions/sentences may sleep? By example, in mycallback() I am calling another functions that also returns int, within this other function I have a while loop, a list_for_each_entry and some strcpy()... Could it be that any of them may sleep? –  jeanc Aug 2 '12 at 14:38
    
Most low-level functions that can sleep have a call to might_sleep() or might_fault() in them. None of the things you've described sleeps. –  caf Aug 3 '12 at 5:04
    
The scheduling while atomic warning should give you a backtrace, which will show you where you've called a sleeping function. –  mpe Aug 6 '12 at 8:05

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