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I want to create a function with the signature seq<#seq<'a>> ->seq<seq<'a>> that acts like a Zip method taking a sequence of an arbitrary number of input sequences (instead of 2 or 3 as in Zip2 and Zip3) and returning a sequence of sequences instead of tuples as a result.

That is, given the following input:

[[1;2;3];
 [4;5;6];
 [7;8;9]]

it will return the result: [[1;4;7]; [2;5;8]; [3;6;9]]

except with sequences instead of lists.

I am very new to F#, but I have created a function that does what I want, but I know it can be improved. It's not tail recursive and it seems like it could be simpler, but I don't know how yet. I also haven't found a good way to get the signature the way I want (accepting, e.g., an int list list as input) without a second function.

I know this could be implemented using enumerators directly, but I'm interested in doing it in a functional manner.

Here's my code:

let private Tail seq = Seq.skip 1 seq
let private HasLengthNoMoreThan n = Seq.skip n >> Seq.isEmpty

let rec ZipN_core = function
    | seqs when seqs |> Seq.isEmpty -> Seq.empty
    | seqs when seqs |> Seq.exists Seq.isEmpty -> Seq.empty
    | seqs ->
        let head = seqs |> Seq.map Seq.head
        let tail = seqs |> Seq.map Tail |> ZipN_core
        Seq.append (Seq.singleton head) tail

// Required to change the signature of the parameter from seq<seq<'a> to seq<#seq<'a>>
let ZipN seqs = seqs |> Seq.map (fun x -> x |> Seq.map (fun y -> y)) |> ZipN_core
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3  
At first sight this looks like a matrix transpose function (provided the third inner list should actually read [3;6;9]). Have you looked at this SO question? –  Anders Gustafsson Aug 2 '12 at 5:51
    
@Anders Gustafsson You're right, it is. Thanks for the link and the typo note. –  Lawrence Johnston Aug 2 '12 at 16:31
1  
@LawrenceJohnston: It may not matter to you, but Tomas' answer in the question Anders linked to does not handle sub-lists of different lengths (same with Michael's solution below). –  Daniel Aug 2 '12 at 16:44
    
@Daniel Thanks for pointing that out. –  Lawrence Johnston Aug 2 '12 at 16:45
    
Sure. Typical zip behavior is to stop after the shortest sub-list is enumerated. –  Daniel Aug 2 '12 at 16:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted
let zipn items = items |> Matrix.Generic.ofSeq |> Matrix.Generic.transpose

Or, if you really want to write it yourself:

let zipn items = 
  let rec loop items =
    seq {
      match items with
      | [] -> ()
      | _ -> 
        match zipOne ([], []) items with
        | Some(xs, rest) -> 
          yield xs
          yield! loop rest
        | None -> ()
    }
  and zipOne (acc, rest) = function
    | [] -> Some(List.rev acc, List.rev rest)
    | []::_ -> None
    | (x::xs)::ys -> zipOne (x::acc, xs::rest) ys
  loop items
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the matrix solution is the shortest and clearest. Seeing alternate ways to write it out by hand is helpful too. –  Lawrence Johnston Aug 2 '12 at 16:29

To handle having sub-lists of different lengths, I've used option types to spot if we've run out of elements.

let split = function
    | []    -> None,    []
    | h::t  -> Some(h), t

let rec zipN listOfLists =
    seq { let splitted = listOfLists |> List.map split

          let anyMore = splitted |> Seq.exists (fun (f, _) -> f.IsSome)

          if anyMore then
              yield splitted |> List.map fst
              let rest = splitted |> List.map snd
              yield! rest |> zipN }

This would map

let ll = [ [ 1; 2; 3 ];
           [ 4; 5; 6 ];
           [ 7; 8; 9 ] ]

to

seq
    [seq [Some 1; Some 4; Some 7]; seq [Some 2; Some 5; Some 8];
     seq [Some 3; Some 6; Some 9]]

and

let ll = [ [ 1; 2; 3 ];
           [ 4; 5; 6 ];
           [ 7; 8 ] ]

to

seq
    [seq [Some 1; Some 4; Some 7]; seq [Some 2; Some 5; Some 8];
     seq [Some 3; Some 6; null]]

This takes a different approach to yours, but avoids using some of the operations that you had before (e.g. Seq.skip, Seq.append), which you should be careful with.

share|improve this answer
    
I forget to mention why you should be careful. When you skip items in a list, you can just repeatedly discard the head element. However, Seq.skip creates a thunk referencing the original sequence, with the instruction “skip n elements”. This has to be executed every time the sequence is enumerated, and is obviously slower. Seq.append has similar problems. –  Michael Lynch Aug 2 '12 at 12:15
    
Also, this solution is tail recursive :) It handles very long input fine (e.g. ll = [ [1..100000]; [1..100000]), which would definitely cause a stack overflow otherwise! –  Michael Lynch Aug 2 '12 at 12:16
    
Thanks, both for the solution and the skip/append warnings. I like this solution best of the write-it-out-by-hand options. –  Lawrence Johnston Aug 2 '12 at 16:30

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