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It is C language.It is written that:

typedef struct __attribute__((packed, aligned(4))) Ball {
    float2 delta;
    float2 position;
    //float3 color;
    float size;
    //int arcID;
    //float arcStr;
} Ball_t;
Ball_t *balls;

Please tell me what is the meaning of it,and how to use this keywork.

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2  
It's a "type attribute" .. (I found this with "C attribute packed" in Google. Surely others can at least do as good!) –  user166390 Aug 2 '12 at 3:01
1  
See this question -- though with aligned(4) you probably don't have much to worry about. –  Keith Thompson Aug 2 '12 at 4:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Before answering, I would like to give you some data from Wiki


Data structure alignment is the way data is arranged and accessed in computer memory. It consists of two separate but related issues: data alignment and data structure padding.

When a modern computer reads from or writes to a memory address, it will do this in word sized chunks (e.g. 4 byte chunks on a 32-bit system). Data alignment means putting the data at a memory offset equal to some multiple of the word size, which increases the system's performance due to the way the CPU handles memory.

To align the data, it may be necessary to insert some meaningless bytes between the end of the last data structure and the start of the next, which is data structure padding.


gcc provides facility to avoid structure padding. i.e To avoid this meaningless bytes in some cases. Consider the following structure

typedef struct
{
     char Data1;
     int Data2;
     unsigned short Data3;
     char Data4;

}sSampleStruct;

sizeof(sSampleStruct) will be 12 rather than 8. Because of structure padding. By default, In X86, structures will be padded to 4-byte alignment.

typedef struct
{
     char Data1;
     //3-Bytes Added here.
     int Data2;
     unsigned short Data3;
     char Data4;
     //1-byte Added here.

}sSampleStruct;

We can use __attribute__((packed, aligned(X))) to insist particular(X) sized padding. X should be powers of two. Refer here

typedef struct
{
     char Data1;
     int Data2;
     unsigned short Data3;
     char Data4;

}__attribute__((packed, aligned(1))) sSampleStruct;  

so the above specified gcc attribute does not allow the structure padding. so the size will be 8 bytes.

If you wish to do the same for all the structures, simply we can push the alignment value to stack using #pragma

#pragma pack(push, 1)

//Structure 1
......

//Structure 2
......

#pragma pack(pop)
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If memory store data in 4 byte chunks then why its not adding 2 padding bytes to the unsigned short(its 2 byte long) ? or compiler just add padding bytes to 1st and last members of structure ? can you please clarify it. –  User Mar 6 at 11:33
    
@User Plz refer this too. If you still not clear, plz come for help stackoverflow.com/questions/11772553/… –  Jeyaram Mar 6 at 11:47
  • packed means it will use the smallest possible space for struct Ball - i.e. it will cram fields together without padding
  • aligned means each struct Ball will begin on a 4 byte boundary - i.e. for any struct Ball, its address can be divided by 4

These are GCC extensions, not part of any C standard.

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The attribute packed means that the compiler will not add padding between fields of the struct. Padding is usually used to make fields aligned to their natural size, because some architectures impose penalties for unaligned access or don't allow it at all.

aligned(4) means that the struct should be aligned to an address that is divisible by 4.

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