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My problem: I have a superview EditView that takes up basically the entire application frame, and a subview MenuView which takes up only the bottom ~20%, and then MenuView contains its own subview ButtonView which actually resides outside of MenuView's bounds (something like this: ButtonView.frame.origin.y = -100).

(note: EditView has other subviews that are not part of MenuView's view hierarchy, but may affect the answer.)

You probably already know the issue: when ButtonView is within the bounds of MenuView (or, more specifically, when my touches are within MenuView's bounds), ButtonView responds to touch events. When my touches are outside of MenuView's bounds (but still within ButtonView's bounds), no touch event is received by ButtonView.

Example:

  • (E) is EditView, the parent of all views
  • (M) is MenuView, a subview of EditView
  • (B) is ButtonView, a subview of MenuView

Diagram:

+------------------------------+
|E                             |
|                              |
|                              |
|                              |
|                              |
|+-----+                       |
||B    |                       |
|+-----+                       |
|+----------------------------+|
||M                           ||
||                            ||
|+----------------------------+|
+------------------------------+

Because (B) is outside (M)'s frame, a tap in the (B) region will never be sent to (M) - in fact, (M) never analyzes the touch in this case, and the touch is sent to the next object in the hierarchy.

Goal: I gather that overriding hitTest:withEvent: can solve this problem, but I don't understand exactly how. In my case, should hitTest:withEvent: be overridden in EditView (my 'master' superview)? Or should it be overridden in MenuView, the direct superview of the button that is not receiving touches? Or am I thinking about this incorrectly?

If this requires a lengthy explanation, a good online resource would be helpful - except Apple's UIView docs, which have not made it clear to me.

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 43 down vote accepted

I have modified the accepted answer's code to be more generic - it handles the cases where the view does clip subviews to its bounds, may be hidden, and more importantly : if the subviews are complex view hierarchies, the correct subview will be returned.

- (UIView *)hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{   
    if (!self.clipsToBounds && !self.hidden && self.alpha > 0) {
        for (UIView *subview in self.subviews.reverseObjectEnumerator) {
            CGPoint subPoint = [subview convertPoint:point fromView:self];
            UIView *result = [subview hitTest:subPoint withEvent:event];
            if (result != nil) {
                return result;
            }
        }
    }

    return nil;
}

I hope this helps anyone trying to use this solution for more complex use cases.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks good and thanks for doing it. However, had one question: why are you doing return [super hitTest:point withEvent:event]; ? Wouldn't you just return nil if there is no subview that triggers the touch? Apple says hitTest returns nil if no subview contains the touch. –  CoDEFRo Mar 20 '13 at 0:46
    
Hm... Yea, that sounds just about right. Also, for correct behavior, the objects need to be iterated in reverse order (because the last one is the top-most one visually). Edited code to match. –  Noam May 8 '13 at 11:47
    
Perfect, this helped me make a custom side menu for my project where I bring in custom UIButtons as the menu –  Jay Morgan Jul 26 '13 at 0:00
2  
I've just used your solution to make a UIButton capture the touch, and it is inside of a UIView that is inside of a UICollectionViewCell inside of (obviously) a UICollectionView. I had to subclass UICollectionView and UICollectionViewCell to override hitTest:withEvent: on this three classes. And it works like charm !! Thanks !! –  Daniel García Jul 31 '13 at 12:27
    
The break statement after the return statement is not needed because it will never be executed. Otherwise great answer. –  datwelk Dec 5 '13 at 12:53

Ok, I did some digging and testing, here's how hitTest:withEvent works - at least at a high level. Image this scenario:

  • (E) is EditView, the parent of all views
  • (M) is MenuView, a subview of EditView
  • (B) is ButtonView, a subview of MenuView

Diagram:

+------------------------------+
|E                             |
|                              |
|                              |
|                              |
|                              |
|+-----+                       |
||B    |                       |
|+-----+                       |
|+----------------------------+|
||M                           ||
||                            ||
|+----------------------------+|
+------------------------------+

Because (B) is outside (M)'s frame, a tap in the (B) region will never be sent to (M) - in fact, (M) never analyzes the touch in this case, and the touch is sent to the next object in the hierarchy.

However, if you implement hitTest:withEvent: in (M), taps anywhere in in the application will be sent to (M) (or it least it knows about them). You can write code to handle the touch in that case and return the object that should receive the touch.

More specifically: the goal of hitTest:withEvent: is to return the object that should receive the hit. So, in (M) you might write code like this:

// need this to capture button taps since they are outside of self.frame
- (UIView *)hitTest:(CGPoint)point withEvent:(UIEvent *)event
{   
    for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
        if (CGRectContainsPoint(subview.frame, point)) {
            return subview;
            break;
        }
    }

    // use this to pass the 'touch' onward in case no subviews trigger the touch
    return [super hitTest:point withEvent:event];
}

I am still very new to this method and this problem, so if there are more efficient or correct ways to write the code, please comment.

I hope that helps anyone else who hits this question later. :)

share|improve this answer

What I would do is have both the ButtonView and MenuView exist at the same level in the view hierarchy by placing them both in a container whose frame completely fits both of them. This way the interactive region of the clipped item will not be ignored because of it's superview's boundaries.

share|improve this answer
    
i thought about this workaround as well - it means i will have to duplicate some placement logic (or refactor some serious code!), but it may indeed be my best choice in the end.. –  toblerpwn Aug 2 '12 at 18:57

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